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Defeat Dickinson 



wQ&l y^upY ran c 



Dump the Diplomats 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



VOL. 



XIII 



Educators Assemble 
at State Convention 

I v. WELL REPRESENTED 



Reyn° 



Ids Elected To Post. 



pres. Lynch, Shenk, 
Richie Also Attend 



and 



The 
vania 



annual meeting of the Pennsyl- 
State Education Association was 



be ld December 28-30. in Harrisburg. At 
this convention of the organized educat- 
ors of Pennsylvania, Lebanon Valley 
College was represented by Pres. Lynch, 
n r . H. H. Shenk, Dr. O. E. Reynolds, 
and Dr. G. A. Richie. 

Dr. Lynch, who was the vice-president 
of the department of higher education 
last year, served as a member of the 
House of Delegates representing the de- 
partment of higher education. He also 
has been elected recently to the position 
of president of the Southern Convention 
District and by virtue of this position 
attended the meetings as a platform 
guest. 

Dr. Reynolds served as a member of 
the House of Delegates and represented 
Lebanon Valley College in that body. 
He was elected at the convention to the 
position of secretary of the higher edu- 
cation department. 

The principal meetings of the associa- 
tion were held in the Forum at Harris- 
burg and the departmental and com- 
mittee meetings in several of the Har- 
risburg hotels, chiefly the Penn-Harris. 
The annual convention of the associa- 
tion brings together delegates elected 
from the various departments in its or- 
ganization throughout the State for the 
purpose of actively advancing the general 
educational welfare of the state, as well 
as to provide an inspirational force to 
its members. To this end addresses by 
outstanding educators and legislators 
are heard, and recommendations are 
made to the State Department of In- 
duction, to which the Association is 
dosely allied, with the aim of improv- 
mg conditions through state legislation. 
The speakers for this year's meeting in- 

{GontiriMed on Page 3, Column 2) 



W. and B. Advances 
Members 



°n Tuesday, December 16, the exe- 
' uti ve committee of the Wig and 
Buckle held 



a noon session. This 
feting was called by p res ident Phil- 
P s in order to promote several de- 
lving members. Those to be raised 
g letter membership were: Richard 
aus > Catherine Mills and Mary 
^ ar tuian. These people have shown 

ib Ptk>nal talent and interest ™ the 
' therefore are worthy of ad- 

Ge nc ement. Those to be raised to 
Wu^ 1 members are: Dean Aungst, 
lam Earnest, Woodrow Himmel- 
L e 8lt ' El *a Mason, Anna Morrison, 
jjfo llis ser, Boyd Shaffer, Barbara 
^ion^ 1U)bert Tschopp. In ad- 
"lemb ^ ^ e a( * vancement °f these 
pl ans ers ' the president outlined his 

there °* ^ ° eW y ear * In a few (laJS 
a n(1 j^ 1 ' 1 be a meeting of the Wig 
°ti e . r u °kle Club to decide on some 
Z J* pla y s and skits. The suggest- 
no ; ° ^ ro P '"embers who have shown 
al So , erest in the club this year will 
e discussed. 



ANNVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA, THURSDAY, JANUARY 7, 1937 



No. 17 



Dr. Lynch To Preside 
At Florida U. B. Conf. 



President and Mrs. Lynch are plan- 
ning to take a trip of about two or three 
weeks to Florida, where Dr. Lynch will 
preside at the Florida Annual Confer- 
ence of the Church of the United Breth- 
ren in Christ. They expect to leave 
Sunday morning and drive by way of 
Roanoke, Virginia; Columbia, South 
Carolina; Augusta, Georgia, through 
central Florida to Tampa. Dr. Lynch 
is substituting at the conference for Bi- 
shop G. D. Batdorf, who is touring mis- 
sion fields around the world. The con- 
ference is to be held from January 14 
to January 17 at Tampa in the. church to 
which Mr. Clements, L. V. C. publicity 
manager, is affiliated. 

January 18, President and Mrs. Lynch 
will leave Tampa via the Tamiami 
Trail and drive to Coral Gables, where 
they will be the guests of Dr. and Mrs. 
Ralph L. Engle. Dr. Engle, an alumnus 
of Lebanon Valley, was a member of 
the class of 1905. The trip home will be 
along the coast by way of Jacksonville, 
Savannah, Raleigh, Richmond and 
Savanna, Raleigh, Richmond and Wash- 
Washington. 



Women Debaters Plan 
For Coming Season 

Schedule Includes Debates 
with Four Colleges on 
Labor Question 

The women's debating association met 
at the home of Professor Stokes on 
Tuesday night to discuss its plans for the 
coming season. It was decided that trial 
debates would be held tomorrow after- 
noon and evening among the eight or ten 
women who comprise the association and 
that the members of the teams would 
be selected by a group of faculty mem- 
bers- 

As the schedule now stands, the wom- 
en's team will uphold the negative side 
of the question, "Resolved that Con- 
gress should be empowered to enact 
laws concerning minimum wages and 
maximum hours for industry," at Get- 
tysburg College on the evening of Fe- 
bruary 24. On March 2 a dual debate 
will be held with Ursinus College, on 
March 10 a dual debate with Kutztown 
State Teachers College, and on March 
17 there will be a dual debate with 
Elizabethtown College. 

The manager of the women's teams is 
trying to arrange a trip to Juniata Col- 
(Continued on Page 4, Column 3) 



June Gingrich And 

David Yoke Marry 

During the holiday Prof, and Mrs. 
C. R. Gingrich announced the marriage 
of their daughter, June, to David J. 
Yake, 1935-36 editor of La Vie. 

News of the marriage, which was the 
culmination of a college romance, comes 
as a surprise to their friends. The newly- 
weds were members of the class of 1936. 
While here both were active in school 
affairs, Mrs. Yake in dramatics and as 
president of Delphian, and Mr. Yake as 
editor of the Quittapahilla and of La 
Vie Collegienne. 

The wedding took place more than a 
(Qontitmed on Page 3, Column 4) 



American Association 
Picks Atlantic City 

NOTED MEN PRESENT 



Derlckson, Light, Grismm, and 
Reynolds Attend Special 
Science Sessions 



Probably the most distinguished gath- 
ering of scientific men that takes place 
in the United States convened at Atlan- 
tic City, New Jersey, during the period 
from December 28, 1936, to January 2, 
1937, when the American Association for 
the Advancement of Science and Asso- 
ciated . Societies held its ninety-ninth 
femi-annual meeting at that place. The 
innumerable and varied societies and 
Honorary Fraternities, organized in ev- 
ery conceivable branch of natural sci- 
ence, as well as in psychology, education, 
engineering, and aeronautics, which con- 
stitute the American association, made 
their headquarters and held their meet- 
ings at the principal hotels of the city. 
Dr. Derickson, Dr. Reynolds, Dr. Light, 
and Professor Grimm, of the Lebanon 
Valley College faculty, were present to 
attend many of the meetings and con- 
ferences in which they were particularly 
interested. 

The / merican Association now consti- 
tutes a co-operation of eighteen thou- 
sand individuals, including the most emi- 
nent scientists, teachers, and research 
workers in the United States, affiliated 
both for the purpose implied in its name 
as well as for the object of bringing to- 
gether for presentation and discussion 
all the newly-discovered and important 
developments in the progress of science 
and for the adoption of such measures 
as will tend toward the advancement of 
science. The association holds meetings 
semi-annually, one in the summer and one 
at the close of the year. These meetings 
are held in the principal cities and cen- 
ters of learning both in this country and 
in Canada. The meeting previous to the 
last one was held at Princeton Univer- 
sity, while the next one is scheduled for 
Indianapolis, Ind. 

The six days were a continuous round 
of illustrated lectures, exhibits, demon- 
strations, and conferences, interpolated 
by numerous banquets and smokers. The 
meeting was formally opened at a recep- 
tion given on the evening of December 
28 in the ballroom of the Municipal Au- 
ditorium, at which the president of the 
Association, Doctor Edwin G. Conklin, 
of Princeton University, presided. The 
retiring president, Doctor Karl T. Conip- 
ton, of the Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology, delivered his address en- 
titled "The Electron: Its Intellectual and 
Social Significance." 

Other highlights of the meeting, aside 
from Dr. Compton's address, included 
an exhibit by Dr. Abbot, of the Smith- 
sonian Institution, of his latest develop- 
ment in solar engines, by which he hopes 
man may eventually be able to harness 
directly the energy of the sun. Using a 
concave cylindric parabolic mirror six 
feet long by two feet wide, and four 
250-watt electric lights to take the place 
of the sun, Dr. Abbot demonstrated a 
steam engine operated by the energy 
radiated from the battery of lights. This 
engine is the latest in a long series of 
similar mechanisms developed at the 
Smithsonian Institution. 

The American Association prize of one 
(Contkmed on Page 4, Column 3) 



Captain Kidd To Rule 
At Annual Soph Hop 

On Saturday, January 16, Captain 
Kidd and his Crew, the Sophomore class, 
will make merry in their new hide-away, 
the dusky den of the Annville High 
School. Festivities will take the form of 
a "Pirate Prance," and the Captain's 
Crew, who will have nothing but the 
be t, have demanded that the Harrison- 
ians (the same orchestra that played for 
the Junior Prom last spring) furnish the 
rollicking rhythms for this momentous 
occasion. 

All Merry Men and their Ladies are 
cordially invited to join the pirates in 
their frolic. Come prepared for the 
"Hangman's Swing", the "Cutlass Cap- 
er", the "Gory Gallop", and any other 
diversions they may devise. If the piracy 
should prove too rough, appeal may be 
made to Captain Kidd's trusty henchmen, 
Professor and Mrs. M. L. Stokes, Pro- 
fessor and Mrs. D. Clark Carmean, and 
Dr. and Mrs. S. H. Derickson, who will 
see that justice is meted out. 

Extra entertainment will be provided 
by L. V. talent. 



1937 Gridiron Schedule 
Is Released This Week 



Upsala Eleven Listed on A 
One-Home-Game Schedule 
of Eight Games 



Gridmen representing Lebanon Valley 
will oppose an Upsala eleven in 1937 for 
the first time in the history of the in- 
stitution, according to next year's grid- 
iron schedule released this week by the 
college athletic department. Kutztown 
Teachers, Drexel, and St. Thomas, of 
those teams appearing on the schedule 
of the past season, will not be met in 
I 937> and Muhlenberg and another, eleven 
not as yet definitely selected are teams 
which did not meet the Valleyites in 
1936 but will furnish opposition for the 
Flying Dutchmen during the coming 
reason. 

(Continued on Page 3, Column 4) 



Society Halls Opened 
To Day Student Men 

Temporary Solution Allevi- 
ates Crowded Conditions 
of Men Day Students 



President Lynch in session with the 
presidents of Kalo and Philo, a repres- 
entative of the day student body, and 
Mr. Esbenshade, presented what is to be 
the temporary solution to the over- 
crowded day student room problem. The 
plan as advanced is the only feasible 
course to be taken just now. At present 
this is to include the opening of both 
Kalo and Philo halls to their members 
throughout the day, the college to as- 
sume the responsibility of providing 
waste receptacles and necessary services. 

In the course of the discussion care- 
lessness on the part of the diners in the 
day-student room as well as in Philo 
hall, which had been opened for a short 
time earlier in the year, was attacked. 
Since the trouble seems to originate 

(Continued on Page 4, Column 2) 



Lebanon Valley Five 
Opposes D-son, F.&ML 

TONIGHT & SATURDAY 



Home Game Against Defend- 
ing Champions Opens Lea- 
gue Court Activity 



Tonight Lebanon Valley's Flying 
Dutchmen of the basketball court open 
'ntercollcgiate activity when they journey 
"o Carlisle to oppose Dickinson's quintet 
n a pre-league season contest. On Sat- 
urday night the more important open- 
ing will bring together Franklin and 
Marshall's star outfit and the Blue and 
White courtsters in the league curtain- 
-aiscr on the Lebanon High School floor 
n a contest which will vitally affect the 
shampionship aspirations of both ag- 
gregations. 

The F. & M. Diplomats, with an at- 
tack built around the veterans Woody 
Sponaugle and Captain Johnny Hummer, 
are being granted a splendid chance of 
successfully defending their title accord- 
ing to pre-season information. The Val- 
leyites, on . the other hand, with an out- 
fit of performers who have yet to gain 
experience as a working unit, are rated 
more than an outside chance of ousting 
the Lancaster athletes and should be in 
the thick of the fight all season. If they 
can defeat the defending champs in the 
opener, they will find themselves in fine 
position to wage a successful campaign 
for top honors. Coach Emerson "Chief" 
Metoxen has not as yet decided upon his 
starting lineup, and it is believed that he 
will use tonight's game at Carlisle as 
a means of finding his best combination 
from among the veterans at hand. 

The last time that a Lebanon Valley 
cmintet faced the Dickinsonians, the 
Flying Dutchmen lost a one-point deci- 
sion to their foes when the Red Devils 
spurted in the final moments to over- 
take the Blue and White in a game 
played at Carlisle three years ago. 

The Flying Dutchmen dropped two de- 
cisions to their first home-game oppo- 
nents during last winter's rather disas- 
trous campaign, the Diplomats annexing 
both contests by wide margins. 

Several changes have been made in 
the court schedule of the Blue and White 
quintet since the original schedule was 
listed in La Vie several weeks ago. The 
Dickinson game has been scheduled dur- 
ing the past two weeks, and a second 
Bucknell game has also been arranged, 
to be played at Harrisburg on February 
18. The first Gettysburg game has been 
moved up from January 20 to January 

(Continued on Page 4, Column 4) 



Student Recital 



The second student recital of the 
year will be presented on Tuesday 
evening, January 12, at eight o'clock, 
when advanced students in voice, pi- 
ano, organ, violin, and other string 
instruments will appear. 

This year the conservatory faculty 
has changed the policy of presenting 
soloists in recital. Only advanced stu- 
dents will appear on public recital 
program, and beginning students will 
be heard in afternoon studio recitals. 

The program for January 12 will 
be announced in La Vu: next week. 



I 



PAGE TWO 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, JANUARY 7, 1937 



ESTABLISHED 1925 
A weekly publication by the Undergraduate Students of Lebanon Valley College 

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 

Richard A. Baus, '37 

MANAGING EDITOR ASSOCIATE EDITORS 

Edgar Messersmith, '37 William H. Earnest, '37 

ASSISTANT Louis E straubj '37 
J. Edward Schmidt, '37 

EDITORIAL BOARD 
SPORTS EDITOR FEATURE EDITOR 

William H. Earnest, '37 Louise Stoner, '38 

REPORTORIAL STAFF 

Mildred Gangwer, '39 Conservatory 

Duey Unger, '37 Kalozetan 

Alice Richie, '39 Delphian 

Kenneth Eastland, '37 Philokosmiax 

Grace Naugle, '87 ~~ Clionian 

Harold Beamesderfer, '37 Ernestine Jagnesak, '38 

Karl Flocken, '37 Wanda Price, '38 

Eleanor Lynch, '37 Boyd Shaffer, '38 

Harold Phillips, '37 Calvin Spitler, '38 

Clifford Barnhart, '38 Theresa Stefan, '38 

Elizabeth Bender, '38 William Clark, '39 

Sylva Harclerode, '38 Thomas Guinivan, '39 

Samuel Rutter, '39 Robert Long, '39 

BUSINESS BOARD 
BUSINESS MANAGER CIRCULATION MANAGER 

Robert Kell, '37 Elwood Needy, '37 

ASSISTANT ASSISTANT 
Curvin Dellinger, '38 Ernest Weirick, '39 

Single Copies 5 cents 

Subscription $1.00 per year 

Entered at the Annville, Pa., post office as second class matter, under the Act of 
March 3, 1879. 

Published weekly through the school year, except during holiday vacation and 
examination week. 



REPRESENTED FOR NATIONAL ADVERTISING BY 

National Advertising Service, Inc. 

College Publishers Representative >. 
420 Madison Ave, New York, n. y. 
Chicago « Boston . can Francisco 
Los anoelbs ■ Portland • siattlr 



Editorial statements are not necessarily the consensus of opinion of the 
student body or administration. They are merely the opinions 
of the student editor unless otherwise indicated. 



Vol. XIII 



THURSDAY, JANUARY 7, 1937 



No. 17 



THE CHURCH AND POLITICS 



Although no positive information is available, La Vie's questionnaire on reli- 
gious beliefs and practices of the student body as compared with similar ones con- 
ducted .by other colleges places the Lebanon Valley student in tiie category of the 
"ultra-conservative.' La Vie does not believe that this poll is of world-shaking 
significance. Any questions on theological matters which must be answered by yes 
or no, or by simply checking off one arbitrary statement or another, cannot be made 
the basis for sweeping generalizations. 

'the subjects demand wide discussion and debate, and in most cases no deiinite 
conclusion is reached. At best the results are a faint indication of how tiie modern 
student has reacted to the traditional forms and doctrines of Christianity. 

However, in La Vie's questionnaire, Lebanon Valley students,, as did other 
college and university students, agreed that the church should not take an active 
interest in political issues. It is easy to understand this view when one considers 
the opposition of a particular sect to the child labor amendment and to the spread 
of birth control information. Then, too, the manner in which the religious lobby 
fought a proposal to allow citizens of Pennsylvania to vote on the question of Sun- 
day sports offended many. 

While it is agreed that churches may do themselves more harm than good by 
excursions into the held of politics, there is also a danger that they may focus their 
attention too much on the individual and ignore the social problems about them. It 
is true that individual conduct is important, but nevertheless government action is 
essential in many iields. Are not laws, police forces and jails more effective than 
sermons in reducing crime? Did not individual charity fail to supply the needs of 
the unemployed, making government relief necessary? 

Though nearly all ministers are interested in improvement of social and eco- 
nomic conditions, some preach in such a way as to hinder social progress through 
political action. They maintain that progress must come through improving indi- 
vidual conduct and deprecate "panaceas" for remedying social evils by collective 
action through the state. 

Ministers also discourage social progress by overemphasizing spiritual matters 
and treating problems of material welfare as of secondary importance. What a 
comfort it is to smug, well-fed conservatives to feel that they need not concern 
themselves with the material comforts of others, since spiritual matters are so much 
more important. Give the unemployed and the underprivileged spiritual comfort; 
it is more helpful than such worldly things as food and clothing. It is also much 
cheaper. 

This tendency in many churchmen was well illustrated in a talk by a clergyman 
during the first week in November. This gentleman staled that people were be- 
coming disillusioned with parly platforms and promises, Insinuating that little can 
be hoped for through governmental action. Although he did state that we should 
seek "Christian guidance" in the political campaign, he did not tell us what results 
such a method would yield. He stated that material life is not enough and proudly 
announced that the depression brought a greater interest in spiritual matters. 

If the church allows its members to forget their social responsibilities by a too 
great emphasis on individuals, and by stressing spiritual rather than material 
progress, it will eventually become merely an "opiate of the people." It will try to 
make the underprivileged content with their unjust share of material goods by an 



emphasis on spiritual comforts. At the 
same time, it will ease the consciences of 
those who exploit them by attacking the 
idea of progress through political meas- 
ures. 

Those in the church should not forget 
that there are social as well as individual 
problems, material as well as spiritual 
needs. The church should not discourage 
attempts to meet these needs through 
governmental action. 



Benjamin Owen Weds 
Parian Anderson in iV. Y. 



Miss Narian Anderson, of New York 
City, and Benjamin Owen, piano instruc- 
tor on the conservatory faculty, were 
married in old Trinity Episcopal Church, 
New York, on December 21 at five- 
thirty o'clock. 

Miss Anderson, as she is known pro- 
fessionally, is a native of Havana, Cuba. 
At present she is a fellowship holder 
and teacher of piano at Juilliard Grad- 
uate School. In 1932 she was graduated 
from Women's College of the University 
of North Carolina and won a fellowship 
for a year's private study in piano in 
New York with Joseph and Rosina 
Lhevinne. In 1933 -she won the Juilliard 
fellowship she now holds. Miss Ander- 
son and Mr. Owen are known in New 
York City for their two-piano work. 
They are at present making their home 
in New York City. 

La Vie congratulates Mr. Owen on the* 
occasion of his marriage. 



ALUMNI NOTES 



On New Year's Day Mr. and Mrs. 
Harry M. Gruber announced the mar- 
riage of their daughter Christine, '34, to 
Kenneth L. Kreider, of Lancaster. They 
were married on July 12, at Frederick, 
Md. Mrs. Kreider has been teaching in 

the Palmyra, publie schools. 

* # « 

Dr. A. S. Lehman, D.D., who was pas- 
.or of the Derry Street Church, at Har- 
risburg, died Decern! er 21. AHhough not 
i graduate, he has been for a number of 
years a member of the Lebanon Valley 
College board of trustees. His two chil- 
dren both graduated from L. V., Mrs. 
Ethel Ralston in '22, and William W. 
Lehman, '32. 

* * * 

The Rev. Dr. Harry E. Schaeffer, '17, 
pastor of the Grace United Brethren 
Church, at Penbrook, and Mrs. C. S. 
Thompson, of Plymouth, ind., were mar- 
ried December 30 at Indianapolis, Ind. 
Dr. Schaeffer, who recei.ed (he honorary 
degree of Doctor of DivL.ity from Leba- 
non Valley College, is a member of the 
Board of Trustees. 

* * * 

Announcement was recently made of 
the marriage of C. Daniel Engle, '84, of 
1 Iummelstown, to Miss Eva Kaylor, 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Harry B. 
Kaylor, of Ilighspire, .July 2(i, 1935, at 
Luray, Va. 

* I * * 

The Rev. Dr. El < >. Uurtner, '90, was 
appointed supply pastor to fill the va- 
cancy in the pastorate of the Derry 
Street United Brethren Church, Harris- 
burg, caused by the death of the Rev. 
Dr. A. S. Lehman. 

* * # 

Park I 1 rich, '29, was elected a dele- 
gate to the National Educational Asso- 
ciation at a recent meeting of the State 
Educational Association. 

* * * 

Miss Lucille Shenk, '23, attended the 
meeting of the State Educational Asso- 
ciation in Ilarrisburg as a, delegate rep- 
resenting the Heishey schools. 

* * * 

December 24, announcement was made 
of the engagement of Miller Schmuck, 
'36, to Miss Eleanor Miller, of York. 
The wedding will take place in the 
spring. 



La Vie Polls Students 1 Religious Feelinq 



Yes, 198; no, 54; no answer, 7. 

-— i— 10. Class? Class of '40, 89; Class of 

aspects of religion, only 8% voicing a '39, 51; Class of '38, 60; Class of '37, & 

11. Sex? Male, 157; female, 102. 

— /u 12. Field of major academic interest 

read them for spiritual guidance, 9% for Science, mathematics, 73; English, Lat- 



literary value, while 38% are undecided 
27% declined to answer 




The typical Lebanon Valley student, sex in the opinions of Lebanon i 
as indicated from La Vies poll of reli- College students on religious " * llev 
gious attitudes and beliefs, attends reli- li*»U#>f « 

gious services weekly, prays regularly, 
uses blasphemous language occasionally, 
and reads his Bible less than once a 
month. 

This poll was taken in chapel the week 
before Christmas, a total of 259 ques- 
tionnaires being collected. 

The summary showed that l'/ of the 
students believe that religious faith is 
primarily a question of intellect, 24% be- 
lieve that it is primarily a question of 
feeling, while 69'/ r are either undecided 
or think that religious faith is a com- 
bination of both feeling and intellect. 

Students overwhelmingly opposed the 
church's taking an active interest in po- 
litical issues, the vote being 174 to 75. 
Nevertheless they agree that the church 
should "exert its influence to help mold 
society." Likewise they agreo that the 
church should concern itself with moral- 
ity and sin as a matler of social con- 
cern. 

On the whole the typical L. V. C. stu- 
dent is very conservative and when the 
classes were compared on a percentage 
basis it was noted that the four groups 
are strikingly homogeneous. The fresh- 
men, however, are somewhat above the 
average, while the seniors fall just below 
Liie standard. 

Perhaps the only and most striking- 
variance between the four classess is in- 
dicated by the result that 10% of the 
iTeshmen would not join any religious 
sect if they were free to do so, while 
21% of the seniors indicated the same 
answer. 

When the answers to the questionnaire 
.vere compiled in groups relative to ma- 
jor academic interest the results exhi- 
bited the same homogeneity as the four 
.lasses. The science students, however, 
<.re 10% more blasphemous than the av- 
erage 65 f / c , but nevertheless go to 
church, pray, and read their Hibles as 
regularly as their fellow-students. 

20% of the English and modern lan- 
guage majors, as compared with the av- 
erage of 14%, would not join any reli- 
gious sect if they were free to do so. 

Missionary activities are sanctioned, 
students voting 198 to 54 that the church 
should "propagandize' its doctrines in 
non-Christian lands. Personal salvation 
as a concern of religious bodies was 
agreed to by 202, while only 46, or 18%, 
opposed. Students strongly favored the 
position that the moral and spiritual 
needs of the individual are important 



Total questionnaires returned; 959 

1. With what religious body are 
nominally affiliated? 

United Brethren, 86; Luther. 
Reformed, 33; Presbyterian, 23- jj * 1; 
dist, 21; Roman Catholic, 16; Evai!? ' 
cal, 11; others, 17; none, H. ' 8eli - 

2. If you were free today to j i n 
religious sect or not to join <>.«« an - v 
you join one on the basis of vour n„ 
beliefs? P HJ 

Yes, 201; no, 37; no answer, 21 

3. How regularly do you attend rdj 
gious services? 

Weekly, 174; at least once a month 
47; several times a year, 30; never 8 ' 

4. How often do you pray? 
Regularly, 138; occasionally, 95. Bft 

er, 22; no answer, 4. 

5. Do you use blasphemous language'. 
Frequently, 28; occasionally, Uq. n ^ 

er, 90; no answer, 1. 

6. How often do you read the Bible* 
Several times a week, 43; about once a 

week, 47; more than once a month 43. 
less than once a month, 84; never, 4i . no 
answer, 1. 

7. Do you read the Bible primarily 
for spiritual guidance? 69; primarily for 
its literary value? 22; both, 97; no an- 
swer, 71. 

8. Is religious faith primarily a ques- 
tion of the intellect? 19; feeling? 63; 
both, 162; no answer, 15. 

9. Do you believe that the church 
should: 

(a) Concern itself with personal sal- 
vation? 

Yes, 202; no, 46; no answer, 11. 

(b) Concern itself with the moral and 
spiritual needs of the individual? 

Yes, 229; no, 21; no answer, 9. 

(c) Concern itself with morality and 
sin as a matter of social concern? 

Yes, 223; no, 21; no answer, 15. 

(d) Exert its influence to help mold 
society? 

Yes, 230; no, 19; no answer, 10. 

(e) Take an active interest (as an 
ecclesiastical body) in political issues/ 

Yes, 75; no, 174; no answer, 10. 

(f) Propagandize its doctrines in non- 
Christian lands? 



i- in, modern languages, 55; music, 
tory, philosophy, Bible, 42; business 



50; his- 



Likewise there is no variation due to ministration, 33; no answer, 6. 



VACATION NEWS 



Members of the faculty found quite 
varied methods of spending their two 
weeks vacation : 

Prof, and Mrs. E. P. Rutledge, their 
son George Edward, and Miss M. E. 
Gillespie motored to Florida and were 
gone for ten days. 

Dr. and Mrs. E. H. Stevenson spent a 
week at the home of Dr. Stevenson in 
Russelville, Arkansas. The trip was un- 
usually happy for Dr. Stevenson be- 
cause his children, Rufus and Margaret, 
have been living in Russelville for some 
time. Dr. Stevenson expects to have the 
children return to Annville as soon as 
the worst of the winter is over. 

Miss L. L. Lietzau spent twelve days 
in New York City, where she attended 
a dinner and reunion of friends whom 
she met last summer at Weimar in 
Thuringia, Germany. Miss Lietzau at- 
tended the Christmas service at Dr. 
Fosdick's church and visited many fa- 
mous churches and cathedrals. She also 
attended numerous concerts and theater 



productions. 

Miss E. Moyer also spent the vacations 
in New York. 

Mrs. Green and her daughter Yvonn* 
spent several days at Atlantic City. 

Miss E. Henderson visited in ^ aryS 
ville and Columbus, Ohio. .| 

Mr. Allen B. Engle "with his ^ 
from Seattle, Wash., spent two wee 

• • • , r r>,- and iir 

visiting at the homes of vr- d T ^ 

Andrew Bender and Dr. and Mrs- J-^ 
Engle of Palmyra. Mr. Engle, a * { 
uate of the Sheffield Scientific Sch °° veaf 
Yale University spent his Freshman ^ 
at L. V. C. He is a brother to ^ 
Bender and J. R. Engle, the presi de 
the Board of Trustees. 

ikes' 



Prof, and Mrs. M. L. S^g^ 
several days at the home of * r °^ 3 \$o 



They 

parents in Sarnia, Ontario. pgtro' 1, 
visited in Toronto, Canada, and 
Mich. OA- 
Miss Muriel Wallace of Toron lle ' 
ada, spent several days in ^ m ^^j 3 \\i ct 
ing her brother, Dr. P. A. W- df d 
Last Saturday Dr. Wallace ^ go- 
the meeting of the Penna. Hi« t0 
ciety in Philadelphia. 



0i 

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P 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, JANUARY 7, 1937 



PAGE THREE 



jOi 

.n y 



•ear 
dent 01 



spent 
Stoke 5 ' 
also 

■ok 



■y 



! vis' 1 ' 



|t Isn't D 



one 



contribution to the finest little 



ur p a per this side of the Mississ 
Vdv't) this week is of a nature 
ipp' ^ different from our usual run of 
0r ' ^ g we face the keyboard we are 
dr' v ^' w ith the realization that a 
V of ti. V. doings during the va- 
w ould he similar in many respects 



^ on— 

c f T, V. doings during the va 

.quinary 

cation 
an 

jjsidered by the best judges a good 



opiate. And since live lines of "It 
^ pone" (when we have no material) 



dose for an adult, we leave the 

us and present: A Very Brief List- 

IffVsome of Those Who Have Earned 

iDg Recognition of Their Countrymen 

ttlC • a the Past Twelvemonth, 
ptirmg 

The laundryman in New York's 

' 4. rt «rn who, in process of naturali- 
rtjjjiai"" 

t on, chose the name Truck On Down. 
li ' The kitten who wanted to watch 
Forest Hills tennis matches because 
.- y rnan was in that racket. 
^ The patriots who donated five mil- 
airplanes to the Chinese national 
' Merriment to repel foreign aggressors, 
and who prescribed that on the wings of 
aC h plane should be painted "Not To 
Be Used for Civil War." 

The Illinois counterfeiters who 
jjjnecl out five dollar bills with a wink 
in Lincoln's right eye. 

The Virginia counterfeiters who 
inadvertently printed bills bearing ten 
dollar markings on one side and five 
dollar numerals on the other. 

. The Utah safe-crackers who loot- 
ed a safe marked "burglar proof" and 
scratched the words "Believe it or not" 
on the safe's enameled surface before 
departing. 

. The witness in a Missouri trial 
who, tiring of the questions the oppos- 
ing lawyer was firing at him, and his 
incessant demands for "Yes" or "No" 
answers, drew a revolver from his pock- 
et and shot the lawyer dead. 

• 

. . . The libel suit that a New York 
matron brought against the ghost writer 
who was writing society gossip for her, 
but who was also writing a piece about 
the George Washington Bridge, and who 
got the two articles mixed, publishing 
the following under the lady's name: "I 
have been walked on all day, run over 
and beaten down, and my cables are 
seary. But I'm a tough old thing and 
can take it. The gentlemen of the Port 
°f New York Authority took care of 
that." 

■ • • The Chicago divorce suit in which 
fte wife claimed that the husband had 
sto Pped speaking to her ten years ago 
an( l had been ever since communicating 
^th her only through letters picked 
frot » alphabet soup. 

• 

' • • The charge of fraudulent imper- 
*">ation lodged against the leader of a 
^oupe of strolling players in Bohemia 
responded graciously when the 
Nsant audience called for "Author! 
' uth °r!" at the conclusion of a very bad 
Wormance of "King Lear." 

' " • The suit brought by the co-eds 
fires' S ° llth ° akota colle £ e to compel the 
tog * t0 remove a statue of the Ve- 
* ^ e Milo from the room where the 
Wis 



received men callers. 



'•oil 

c allin„ 



t\J. ^ e P r °g ram -seller at the Indiana 
football game who was fired for 
jji ^ ° ut > "Names, numbers, and sal- 
S of all the players." 

• 

f! ta ^ Hindu who hypnotized Rivi- 

uf „, tIlen into serving him drinks free 
^rge. 

ttai n . Siamese twins who got on a 
UNn n Missouri with only one ticket, 

S Vtio ^ COnduotor t0 wire for in ~ 
u «ah]« ? S ' Which instructions were: "If 



% ^ to collect the other fare, make 
tfahv, 6 ' 111 ^ to Put one of them off the 

' • Tb 

%a j .J e tllree inmates of a West Vir- 

H er who stole the 

homemade fudge 
*H W } 10 PriS(>ner ' s wife had brought him, 
er e promptly poisoned by it. 



We could go on like this for hours, 
but the Ed. just got in a new carload of 
blue-pencils. If you like 'em, let us know 

ind you'll see some more. 

But before we close our current as- 
sault upon belles lettres, we must print 
an item appearing in the Pet Depart- 
ment of the Plain field (N. J.) Courier 
News: "If the canary refuses to use his 
bird-bath, try sprinkling a little sand 
in the bottom of the bath before filling 
with water. The bird's refusal is often 
due to a slippery bottom." Or, we think, 
you could try letting the little fellow 
keep his pants on. — VUliami. 



EDUCATORS ASSEMBLE 

AT STATE CONVENTION 



{Continued from page 1) 



eluded : Lester K. Ade, State Superin- 
tendent of Public Instruction; George 
D. Strayer, Columbia University; Gov. 
George H. Earle ; Charles T. Loram, 
Yale University ; Homer S. Chaillaux, 
Director of the National Americanism 
Commission of the American Legion ; 
and the Hon. Joshua B. Lee (D.) U. S. 
Senator, Oklahoma. 

The avowed purpose of the association 
is to promote the general educational 
welfare of the state, to protect and ad- 
vance the interests of its members, to 
foster professional zeal, to advance edu- 
cational standards, and to establish and 
maintain helpful friendly relationships. 
To this end a committee has been ap- 
pointed of which Dr. Reynolds is a 
member, to champion their proposed five- 
year plan under which a grade school 
teacher will be required to obtain a 
master's degree within ten years of their 
careers as educators. 



Juniors Defeat Frosh 
To Tie For Loop Lead 

In subduing the Frosh, 40 to 28, on 
Monday night, the Juniors succeeded in 
gaining a tie for first place in the Inter- 
Class League, sharing the top position 
with the Seniors. The two leading teams 
have each won two games while losing 
none, and the Sophs and Frosh have yet 
to register a win. 

In Monday's tussle, while Frey, the 
upperclassmen's ace, was being held in 
check by Bender, the Greenies' center, 
Dean Gasteiger went on a one-man scor- 
ing spree and collected fifteen points to 
lead the Juniors to triumph. Assisting 
him in the scoring were Capka and 
Gongloff, with Seiverling and Peffley the 
big guns for the losing quintet. 

In order to increase the attendance at 
the games, the Men's Senate has decided 
to schedule the contests for Tuesdays 
and Thursdays instead of Mondays and 
Wednesdays. The games will begin im- 
mediately after the recreation hours, 
and it is hoped that the students will re- 
main on hand to cheer for their respec- 
tive teams. On next Tuesday night the 
Seniors meet the Juniors to temporarily 
settle the dispute for leadership of the 
league. 

The summaries: 

Juniors 

G. F. T. 

Gasteiger F 7 1 J S 

Heller F 204 

Capka F 408 

Frey C 2 1 5 

Davies G 1 2 

Gongloff G 306 

Totals !9 2 40 

Freshmen 

G. F. T. 

Peffley F 5 o 10 

Seiverling F '5 2 12 

Bender C 204 

Moller G 1 2 

Baker G 000 



White Elephant Party 
To Be Held by W.A.A. 

Take that Christmas tie off — 
you've done your duty. Use 
it for admission. 



To those worthies who like to attend 
affairs where glamor, color, and music 
arc the vogue, but who lack the neces- 
sary cash, there will soon be offered 
a happy solution whereby admission may 
be gained without the payment of any of 
the precious root of evil. The admittance 
fee to this festival will be one "white 
elephant." To the casual reader it might 
seem that white elephants are scarce in- 
deed, and that the fortunate possession 
of one should be entitled to a greater 
privilege than admission to a party, but 
az a matter of fact, everyone owns a 
white elephant or two — or maybe three — 
or maybe a dozen. A "white elephant" 
is defined as any article which, in spite 
of its intrinsic value, has lost original 
attraction to its owner. Christmas neck 
ties, books on etiquette, desk calendars, 
photographs of old flames, and so forth 
are often found among the individuals' 
assortment of "white elephants." Any 
article of this nature will be accepted in 
payment for admission to the white ele- 
phant party, the date and details of 
which will be made known by the 
W. A. A., which is to be the sponsor 
of this novel project. These "white ele- 
phants" will be sold at auction at the 
party. Other amusements will include 
fortune telling and a fishing party. 

Editor's note : Had this party taken 
place around New Year's eve we could 
have made use of those pink elelephants 
which caused us such annoyance. 



1937 GRIDIRON SCHEDULE 

IS RELEASED THIS' WEEK 



(Continued from page 1) 



Bucknell, St. Joseph's, Penn Military, 
Albright, and Juniata will be opposed 
again in 1937 to round out a schedule of 
eight games. Upsala will form the op- 
position for the Blue and White on Nov- 
ember 6, the game to be played at East 
Orange, New Jersey, where the institu- 
tion is situated. With but one member 
of the football squad, Art Heisch, hon- 
orary captain from New York City, 
graduating next June, the Blue and 
White gridders should present a formid- 
able combination. An open date is now 
listed in the schedule for October 16, 
but negotiations are being made with 
several institutions to fill this date, which 
is not intended to remain permanently 
open. The schedule as released Tues- 
day is as follows : 

October 2 — -Bucknell, Away. 

October 9 — Muhlenberg, Away. 

October 16 — Open. 

October 23 — St. Joseph'.-'. Away. 

October 30 — P. M C Home. 

November 6 — Upsala, Away. 

November 13 — Albright, Away. 

November 20 — Juniata, Away. 



JUNE GINGRICH 

DAVID YAKE MARRY 



(Continued from page 1) 



year ago, on November 17, 1935, in the 
Christ Lutheran Church at Elizabeth- 
town. Rev. Frank Croman officiated at 
the ceremony, and the couple was attend- 
ed by Mr. John E. Sloat, '34, and his 
wife. 

Close friends and relatives were en- 
tertained at the Gingrich home last Sat- 
urday evening. 



What They Say 

Questiox — What reform do you be- 
lieve is most needed by America to- 
day? 



PAUL ULRIGH, Junior — Nothing- 
can be done until people who are sup- 
posed to be grown-up stop acting like 
children. 

* * * 

MARY ZARTMAN, Junior— I think 

racketeering should be cleaned up. 

* * ♦ 

O. W. WHITE, Freshman — The abol- 
ishment of conviction and execution with- 
out trial, as it exists in certain parts of 
his country. 

* * # 

RUTH PHENIClE, Senior — I think 
that what America needs most is a re- 
turn to the Church. 

* * » 

JOHN SPEG, Senior-— I'm a racketeer 

myself, and I don't want any reforms. 

* * # 

DR. H. H. SHENK— The most im- 
portant reform needed today is to get 
lack to man's fundamental conception 
if his relation to society — not what he 
•an get, but what he can give. 

* * * 

LUCILLE HAWTHORNE, Junior— 
1 think the younger generation should 
;top reading "Esquire." 

* * * 

ROBERT TSCHOPP, Sophomore— 
What America needs is a little more 
?,pen-mindedness, understanding and in- 
terpretation of young people and their 
needs, and a little old-fashioned "horse 
sense." 

* * # 

JULIA JOHNSON, Sophomore — A 
return to old-fashioned standards and 
the simpler form of living. 




STEEL- 
TOMAHAWK PIPE 



ET 

THAT COMBINATION] ^ 

TOMAHAWK AND PIPE 

THE INDIANS USED 

MUST HAVE SMOKED 

|||^HOT 



PROBABLY-A 
METAL BOWL IS 
RATHER 
PRIMITIVE J" 




AS A MATTER 
OF FACT, MY 
PIPE SMOKES 
HOT AS BLAZES 



YOUR PIPE WOULD ] 
BE O.K. WITH THE 
TOBACCO BUILT 
FOR COOLNESS- 
PRINCE ALBERT 




SOUNDS PRACTICAL, 
JUDGE 



' SURE IT IS. RAJS 
SCI ENTI FICALLy 'CRIMP CUT 
— IT PACKS SNUGLY IN 
a A PIPE — SMOKES MILD 
s=xi AND MELLOW — 




WHAT'S MORE— R A. 
NEVER SITES THE 

TONGUE THERES 

JOY GALORE IN THAT 
TASTY P. A. FLAVOR 



EACH PUFF ADDS 
VOLUME TO YOUR 
~7 STORY JUDGE 




■Mill 



MEN ! ENJOY TKlhlCBLY SMOKING- WITH 
PRINCE ALBERT. TS A. TOBACCOS ARE MILP 
fiiNP AA6LLOW. 7. A. SMOKES COOL ...IT'5 'CRIMP 

cut: ANV P. A. TOES N'T SITE THE TONfrUE. 
PRINCE ALBERT IS THE NATIONAL JOY SMOKE ! 



upr., 1S87. U. J. Reynolds Tob. C>. 



50 



pipefuls of fra- 
grant tobacco in 
every 2-ounce tin 
of Prince Albert 



PRINCE ALBERT MONEY-BACK GUARANTEE 

Smoke 20 fragrant pipefuls of Prince Albert. If you don't find it the mellow- 
est, tastiest pipe tobacco you ever smoked, return the pocket tin with the 
rest of the tobacco in it to us at any time within a month from this date, and 
we will refund full purchase price, plus postage. 

(Signed) R. J. REYNOLDS TOBACCO COMPANY 
Winston-Salem, North Carolina 



NinceAl 



BERT 



THE NATIONAL 
JOY SMOKE 




PAGE FOUR 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, JANUARY 7, 1937 



THE MODERN MAID 

OR 

The Downfall of Joe College 



Joe College, walking down the street, 
approached a damsel fair and sweet, 
who, thumbing, waited for a car to take 
her to her home afar. The South Hall 
porch loomed large ahead, but other- 
wise the place was dead. Joe College, 
elegant and gay, had something funny 
he would say. And so he smiled and 
doffed his hat — next minute he was ly- 
ing flat! The gal, though cultured and 
refined, was of the hockey playing kind. 
At school, since she was very small, she'd 
been a whiz at basketball; and in the 
lab with quip and jest she cut up dog- 
fish with the rest; and she indulged in 
day-long walks, and she could wrestle, 
run, and box; and in the library search- 
ed the nooks for the most difficult of 
books. And in the dining hall they say 
she ate her fruit cup twice a day. And 
she could dance, and she could swim; 
she won high honors in the gym. To 
chapel she would come and sing, or laugh 
at Saylor's bellowing. To sum it up, 
she was a lass with beaucoup pep and 
lots of class. 

In olden times the lonely maid would 
be excited and afraid if some bad bruiser 
came her way, attempting to be fresh 
and gay. The old-time gals led sheltered 
lives until Dame Fortune made them 
wives. The only games they used to 
play were "hunt the button" and cro- 
quet. They'd stay at home and cook 
some fudge; they knew no games like 
"cheat the judge." They took a pride in 
being weak — in being modest, shy, and 
meek. And when accosted by some gent 
who was on obscure business bent, they'd 
raise a frightened cry eftsoon, or sink 
supinely in a swoon. 

But this fair maid of whom I sing, 
and who is not a myth, by jing! She 
socked Joe College on the chin so hard 
she drove his jaw bones in ! She grabbed 
Joe College by the neck — converted him 
into a wreck, then beat the wretch upon 
the nose ti l it bled like River Shannon 
flows, then tied him up into a ball and 
tossed him up beside South Hall. He 
slunk away, an abject skate, to keep a 
more important date. The damsel, calm 
and quite serene, then thumbed a pass- 
ing limou ine. When she got home she 
rubl ed, I wist, some liniment upon her 
fist. 

I like old manners and old ways; I 
doff my hat to yesterdays. But still, 
though I'm not a sage, I'm glad I'm liv- 
ing in this age. 



Co-ed Comment 



Calamities seemed to happen thick and 
fast during the Christmas holidays. The 
first was a haul made by a certain young 
lady of North Hall. From the male ele- 
ment of her acquaintances she received 
a white manicure set, a ruby ring, and a 
book of Emily Dickinson's poems as a 

reminder of the Junior class play. 
» • • 

Calamity 2 — Dot Long tells us that 
Bob was given a French drape for a 
suit. Personally, the only French drapes 
we've ever seen were decorating follies 
girls, but be that as it may, she said it 

was a French drape. 

# # » 

Calamity 3 — Evelyn Evans was enrap- 
tured while seeing the women's champion 
ice skater do her stuff. So very enrap- 
tured was she that when waltzing out in- 
to the aisle of the theatre, she fell on 
her hands and knees in an attempt to 

imitate that same graceful champion. 

* * * 

Calamity 4 — We hear that the Roberts 
home was in great confusion during va- 
cation when Carolyn, quoting from her, 
"put to scrubbing floors until five In the 
morning after New Year's night." Ho- 
mer Donmoyer was terribly embarrassed. 



Pres. Lynch, Daughter, 
And Son III At Home 



The Lynch household seems to be suf- 
fering from too much vacation. At pres- 
ent Dr. Lynch, Eleanor, and John are 
all confined to their beds. 

John contracted pneumonia the day 
school closed for the Christmas recess 
and was quite seriously ill for two weeks, 
during which time he lost considerable 
weight. Now, however he is regaining 
both health and weight rapidly and hopes 
to be able to return to classes before 
exams begin. 

Eleanor has had la grippe since Sun- 
day, but is rapidly recovering. 

In spite of many duties, Pres. Lynch 
has been forced to remain in bed since 
Tuesday. He hopes to be well in time to 
go to Florida next week to take the 
place of Bishop Batdorf in presiding at 
a United Brethren conference. 



The New Books 

In The Blue Hills Cornelius Weygandt 
re-creates, as few writers can, the very 
'feel" of a countryside, bringing to life 
within the reader's mind the landscape, 
the way the people think and act the 
past that has colored the present, in 
short, the small things bound up with 
living. The present volume is doubly 
dear to us, because the ''Blue Hills" are 
those of our native state as well as Mr. 
VVeygandt's — Pennsylvania. There is 
m.rdiy a corner of it that does not bring 
some familiar association: Valley Forge 
aad Gettysburg, with all those names 
connote; the fords and ferries and old 
covered bridges that cross the rivers; 
sto..e-ended barns and lilacs and fruit- 
trees; Chippendale furniture, old silver, 
r'.ales and Sul.ys and the country or- 
gan; the seven cultures that have gone 
to make the state— Hollander, Swede. 
B.icish Quaker, German, Swiss, Scotch- 
Iri h, Coanecdcut Yankee, and Virgin- 
ian; ra\e..s' nests and frioged gentians; 
talks that we.e racy, wadings in troui 
streams; auctions, gossips in country 
stores and taverns, and hunting expedi 
tions. These things have been woven in- 
to the ^exture of a book so firmly rooted 
in the American past that it transcends 
any merely local interest Mr. Wey- 
gandt, "an author who loves everything 
that savois of l.ving," has let that keen 
savur permeate his book. 

Healthful Living, by Harold S. Diehl, 
M.D., is a clear and commonsense book 
on general health and keeping fit, that 
tells everything the average person 
wants to know about diet, exercise, per- 
sonal hygiene, weight control, treatment 
of colds, etc.— subjects of interest to 
every normal, healthy person. Dr. Diehi 
gives just the information necessary for 
kieping in the best possible physical 
condition. His book is a guide for ail 
those interested in getting the most out 
of one's physical health, and also for 
those who think much of their health, 
but lack the requisite knowledge of v/hat 
is good and what is bad for them, in the 
light of modern medical experience. Dr. 
Diehl is profe sor of Preventive Medi- 
cine and Public Health, and Dean of the 
Medical Sciences at the University of 
Minnesota. 



SOCIETY HALLS OPENED 

TO DAY STUDENT MEN 



(Continued from page 1) 

mainly in the upper-class ranks (the 
Senate untouchables, so to speak) little 
can be hoped for in remedying the situa- 
tion legally. 

President Lynch plans to report to a 
joint meeting of the executive and fin- 
ance committees that the literary so- 
cieties will cooperate in the situation by 
permitting the use of their rooms as a 
temporary solution, and will probably 
recommend some more permanent 
scheme for relief in the future. 



Noch einmal stehen wir an der 
Schwelle eines neuen Jahres oder viel- 
mehr einige Schritte darueber. Und wie 
so viele von uns darueber kamen! Hab- 
en wir den Schritt wohl und ernstlich 
bedacht? War er eigentlich ein schwer- 
er Schritt wie es in dem alten Sprich- 
wort: "Der erste Schritt ueber die 
Schwelle ist der schwerste," heisst? Wir 
koennen da:; kaum glauben. Wir wetten 
es war ein leichter Schritt und ein 
leichtsinniger dabei. Aber so ist der 
Mensch. Denn mehrmals fluent man 
wenn er beten sollte, ist leichtsinnig 
wenn er ernst sein sollte and ist betruebt 
obgleich er eben so gut gluecklich sein 
koennte und umgekehrt. Aber wer kann 
wissen wie man zu einer bestimmten 
Zeit zumute sein sollte. Diese Frage er- 
innert uns an einen Vers von Paul Ger- 
hart und an die Kritik von Gerhart 
Hauptmann die wir hier anfuehren: 
Ach wie ofte dacht' ich doch 
Da mir noch des Truebsals Joch 
Auf dem Haupt und Haise sass 
Und das Leid mein Herze frass : 
Nun ist keine Hoffnung mehr, 
Auch kein Ruhen, bis ich kehr 
In das schwarze Totenmeer. 
Von diesem Verse sagt Gerhart 
Hauptmann : 

"Ganz gewiss gibt es heute niemand, 
Gott sei Dank, der einen Vers wie 
diesen noch nachfuehlen koennte. . . 

Sehr schoen, aber wer weiss wer recht 
hat? Jedenfalls, als Formsache, hoffen 
wir auf ein gesegnetej Neujahr. 



WOMEN DEBATERS PLAN FOR 
COMING SEASON 



(Continued from page 1) 



lege, Penn State College, and Bucknell 
University. Such a trip would last two 
or three days and would include a de- 
bate at each of these schools. 

The following persons make up the 
Women's Debating Association of Leb- 
anon Valley College : coach, Prof. M. 
L. Stokes ; manager, Grace Naugle ; asst. 
manager, Margaret Holbrook; Hazel 
Heminway, Agnes Morris, Belle Mul 
hollen, Jean Harnish, Teresa Stefan, Lil 
Han Leisey, Esther Flom, Evelyn Evans, 
Mary Zartman, and Barbara Bowman, 
tvther Flom is the only veteran from 
die association of last year. 



AMERICAN ASSOCIATION 

PICKS ATLANTIC CITY 



(Continued from page 1) 



thousand dollars which is awarded an- 
nually to the author of the most note- 
worthy paper was presented this year to 
Doctor Stanley, of the Rockefeller In- 
stitute, for his work on the tobacco mo- 
saic, a disease which commonly afflicts 
that plant. Doctor Stanley has drawn 
some very startling conclusions from his 
results and believes that he is approach- 
ing a solution to one of the fundamental 
questions of biology. He professes to 
have discovered that vital principle 
which links the cells of the biologist to 
the atoms of the chemist. It is quite like- 
ly that we shall hear much more of Dr. 
Stanley's work in the near future. 



Another thing that always puzzles us 
is the zeal with which newspapermen 
seek ruthlessly for the truth until they 
become high-salaried publicity agents. 



PEGGY'S BEAUTY 
SHOP 

Special on Frederick Permanent 
Waves 

$4.00 $6.00 

2 blocks West on Sheridan Avenue 



Former L. V. Student 

Granted Fellowship 

Paul Schach, who spent his Freshman 
year here at L. V. and is now a Junior at 
Albright College, has recently been 
granted a fellowship to study in Ger- 
many. Schach will have a choice of 
studying at the University of Berlin or 
at the University of Heidelberg. The 
fellowship, which also provides for ex- 
tensive travel through Germany, was 
granted by the Society for the Advance- 
ment of German-speaking People in Am- 
erica, and was granted for scholarship, 
leadership, personality, and interest in 
German language, literature, and culture. 

Schach, who plans to go to Germany 
as soon as he graduates, has been teach- 
ing German four hours a week at Al- 
bright since the middle of his Sophomore 
year. 



LEBANON VALLEY FIVE 

OPPOSES D-SON, F & M 



(Continued from page 1) 



iq, and the Drexel game originally list- 
ed for the nineteenth will be played on 
February i. 

The Frosh quintet also gets under way 
for the 1937 season this week with a 
pair of game:. Tomorrow night they 
travel to Hershey to contest the Her- 
shey Industrial School quintet, while on 
Saturday night they will play the F. & 
M. Frosh in a preliminary scrap on/ the 
Lebanon High School court. A com- 
plete schedule of the games for the 
Greenies has not yet been announced, but 
will be listed in La Vie at an early date. 



DIEHL DRUG CO. 

103 W. Main St., ANNVILLE, PA. 

Cut Prices on 
Cosmetics 
Hospital Supplies 
Dental Preparations 
Shaving Necessities 
Fountain Service 
"Visit the Safe Place" 
Magazines 
We fill Prescriptions 



Compliments of 

A. & P. STORE 



C. H. SHEARER, Mgr. 



DI NUNZI0 
SHOE SHOP 

"Our Motto is to Please" 
A Trial Will Convince You 
9 E. Main St., ANNVILLE, PA. 



KEYSTONE 
Cleaners and Dyers 

Hats Cleaned and Reblocked 

One Pressing Service 
10 W. Main St., ANNVILLE, PA. 



D. L. SAYL0R & 
SONS 

Contractors 

Lumber and Coal 

ANNVILLE, PENNA. 



RENU SHOP 

One Day Service 
Dry Cleaning, Pressing, i?ep a / r / 
11 E. Main St. ANNVILLE, p. 



KREAMER BROS. 

Furniture 
Floor Coverings 
Electric Refrigerators 
Hoover Electric Sweepers 
Electric Washing Machines 

RCA Radios 
FUNERAL DIRECTORS 
Phone 144 ANNVILLE, Pa 



John Hirsh Dept. Store 

Men's Leather and Wool Jackets 
Wool Mackinaws 
Weyenberg Shoes 
Phone 145 9-11 W. Main St. 

ANNVILLE, PA. 



For School Supplies and 
Books of all Kinds Go To: 

BOLLMAN'S 

628 Cumberland Street 
LEBANON, PA. 



Meals Served Daily 

Best Sundaes in Town with 
Home Made Ice Cream 
Sandwiches, Cigarettes, Candy 

C. D. BRUNNER 

E. Main St. ANNVILLE, PA. 



A Delicious Breakfast 
) 9 

Cream Filled 
Doughnuts 
FINK'S BAKERY 



Annville, Pennsylvania | 



CLOTHING OF QUALITY 

J. S. BASHORE 

Lebanon , 





25 c 

"Cosmopolitan Lunches 
A treat in store 
for you 

THE PENN WAY 



IS 



VOL 

Pro 
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Prance with Pirates 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 




ANNVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA, THURSDAY, JANUARY 14, 1937 



No. 18 



Professor Crawford 
Secures New Machine 



AIM 



• VOICE CORRECTION 



Students Will Be Enabled To 
Hear Their Voices Record- 
ed By Novel Instrument 

Students who sing "Drin ta me onlee 
ith thi neyes an nl-I will pledge with 
f or who talk so fast and indistinctly 
be misunderstood, or who interchange 
their "wees" and "wubbiues" had better 
ste er clear of Professor Crawford's voice 
n d speech correction studio these days, 
for he is the proud owner of a machine 
that will record these faults and preserve 
them for your grandchildren's delight. 
(He's just itching to try his toy, too!) 

However, seriously speaking, if this 
instrument records and plays back to 
the student certain bad features of his 
singing or speaking voice, and every one 
has these faults, it will be doing a good 
job, for the student will be able to hear 
what the professor hears when he in- 
structs him, and more speedy results in 
correcting these faults can be anticipated 
when the pupil as well as the instructor 
knows the weak points. Those not fami- 
liar with voice technique may think this 
a round-about path, to record the voice, 
then audify it to find its weak- 
nesses. They may think that the student 
should be able to hear himself at first 
hand, but this is not so. To quote Pro- 
te:sor Crawford himself on this, "You 
can't 'hear' your own voice." Recording 
is the only possible means of bringing 
to the singer's ear what his voice has 
said or sung. 

Not only will this instrument be used 
for correction purposes, but for concrete 
comparison between the student as a be- 
ginner and, later, as a trained musician. 
Also, this type of recording is invaluable 
111 preserving for the conservatory work 
°f students who may in future years be- 
come well-known in the music world. 
J m s last is what might be termed the 
rouges gallery-souvenir" attribute of 



'his 



newest addition to teaching equip- 



men t being used by our faculty. 

(Contirmed on Page 4, Column 4) 



Deiafe Schedule Listed; 
Male Speakers Selected 



Th. 



e men debaters met with their fa- 



«er, Dr. H. H. Shenk, Mon- 



adv 

Wri* 118 ^ a "d reached the decision that 
Qr th e conventional style and the 

J g0n pla " of debate will be used this 
ea son. 

Th 

b oth que ( Stion for debate is the same for 
s [ Ve ^ men s ar >d women's teams : "Re- 
Pou, that Co »gress should be em- 
m ax - nx minimum wages and 

T h ^ Um hours for industry." 
Cl ark Rowing attended the meeting : 
Mj A hom P s on, and Spitler, who will 

"d the cc 

\ a arnr mative side of the ques- 

Who ' Will Shaffer ' Kinne y and Ehrhart, 
"ey : take the negative. Charles Kin- 

hi s a„ manager ' and Dean Gasteiger is 
T ^ ssis tant. 

Versi tylp edule Wil1 include Lincoln Uni- 
lbrigj lt 22 > Ursinus — March io, 
s %d) and Eliz abethtown (dates not 
^ M M d Wa S ner College, Gettys- 
S ,w len berg, and Juniata, as tenta- 



L.V.C. Quintet Loses 
To Defending Champs 

F. & M. TRIUMPHS, 61-38 



Diplofats Display Wealth of 
Offensive Power As Stew 
Snodgrass Stars 



°t>Po 



nents. 



Lebanon Valley College's quintet lost 
the opening game of the Eastern Pennsy 
league season to the veteran defending 
champions, F. & M.'s Diplomats, in S. 
fast game played on the Lebanon High 
School court last Saturday night. The 
Flying Dutchmen gave a good account 
of themselves, particularly during the 
first half of action, but tired perceptibly 
near the close and were defeated by a 
final score of 61-38. 

Uncovering a speedy offensive attack 
during the last eight minutes of the ini- 
tial half, the Blue and White outfit came 
from behind at 8 to 20 to tie up the count 
at 20-all and left the floor at the inter- 
mission on a plane with their foes at 24 
points apiece. 

However, immediately after the start 
of the second half, the Diplomats stepped 
out to register thirteen straight points 
and assume a 37-24 advantage which the 
Valleyites never could threaten during 
the remainder of action. 

First Half 

Hummer missed a chance to open the 
scoring when he muffed a foul try called 
on Ed Kress, but converted another 
called a few seconds later when Brown 
was detected pushing. Frey tallied the 
first of a series of sensational field goals 
to put L. V. C. in the lead, but Spon- 
augle retaliated with a set shot from the 
foul line. Paul Billett missed a foul 
called on Martin as the play surged 
speedily from one end of the count to 
the other as both teams employed a 
fast-passing attack. Martin got a beauti- 
ful pass in to Sponaugle under the bas- 
ket and the latter converted the chance 
to place F. & M. ahead by a 5 to 2 mar- 
gin. Sponaugle failed to cash in on a 
foul chance called on Frey for charg- 
ing. Frey collected two more points on a 
nifty follow-up of a long shot by Tony 
Rozman, but the sophomore center failed 
to convert a foul chance called on Spon- 
augle. Landers got loose under the bas- 
ket for a sleeper shot, and Frey collect- 
ed another smooth one-handed stab for 
L. V. C. At this point, F. & M. held a 7 
to 6 advantage. Sponaugle registered a 
field goal on a nice follow-up chance, 
and Landers made a foul charged against 
Rozman for holding. Hummer counted 

(Continued on Page 3. Column 2) 



Dramatic Club Drafts 
Reorganization Plans 



At one o'clock Monday, January 11, 
1937, President Phillips called a meeting 
of the Wig and Buckle Executive Com- 
mittee. The purpose of this meeting was 
to outline to its members the plans for 
the coming season- In the week that is 
to follow there will be a regular meeting 
of the Wig and Buckle club. At this 
time the plans that are as yet only vague 
will be placed before the members of 
the club for their discussion and ap- 
proval. In addition the club will be re- 
organized as to the interest of the mem- 
bers in dramatics. There has been a vital 
need for revision, and the committee 
feels that only those interested in the 
club should be left on their list. The 
Executive Committee felt the need for 
the advancement of a few deserving 
members who were not voted on at the 
last meeting. Those advanced were: 
Letter membership, William Earnest, 
Dorothy Kreamer, Louise Stoner, and 
Jean McKeag. 



Political Situation In East 
Discussed By Chapel Speaker 

PHILIPPINE PROFESSOR GIVES VIEWS 



Seniors Defeat Juniors 
Get Top Place In Loop 



Displaying an offensive power that 
would not be suppressed, the Seniors 
assumed undisputed possession of first 
place in the Inter-Class on Monday 
night, subduing the Juniors by a score 
of 48 to 39. 

In complete control of the situation 
at all times, the upper-classmen put on 
a beautiful exhibition of sensational 
shooting, which was featured by the 
playing of Kinney and Trego, the form- 
er with 20 points and the latter with 15 
points. However these men were ably 
assisted by Heisch, Bachman, Loose, and 
Unger, who provided the forwards with 
many scoring opportunities. 

(Continued on Page 4, Column 3) 



Straub Elected President 

Phi Lambda Sigma held their 
weekly meeting for the election of 
their second semester officers. Those 
elected were as follows: 

President, Louis Straub; Vice 
President, Adolph Capka; Secretary, 
Calvin Spitler; Chairman, Executive 
Committee, Robert Tschop ; Treas- 
urer, Raymond Smith; Sergeants-at- 
Arms, Robert Grimm, Jack Moller, 
Danny Seiverling. 



Soph Hop Turns To Pirate Prance 



Those busy young men you see dashing 
about the campus wildly tearing out 
their hair enroute to no place in particu- 
lar are the big guns of the sophomore 
class. The reason they are engaged in 
this extraordinary and unbecoming acti- 
vity is simply that the original ticket 
supply was exhausted on Wednesday af- 
ternoon for their so-called "Pirate 
Prance" which is the classy monnicker 
wherewith the Soph Hop being held at 
the local high school on Saturday night 
has been y-olept. It seems that the un- 
fortunate gentlemen running this busi- 
ness are esconced on the well known 



twin horns, represented on one side by 
the thronging— as they say, yeah throng- 
ing—public and the imperturbable print- 
ers on the other. 

While, of course, a thronging public is 
no sissy by itself, when coupled with an 
imperturbable printer, the business ac- 
quires the possibility of straight-jackets 
in the offing, for a printer is the only 
animal thus far discovered who cannot 
feel a shock of any less severity than an 
earthquake. If you intimate to him that 
you would like to have some tickets 
printed immediately, he may take his 
(Continued on Page 2, Column 3) 



Dr. Rose Points To Far East as a Likely Situation for World 
Troube; Militarism Unable To Solve The Problems Facing 
The People of The World Today 



Shall the world be ruled by military dictatorships or by the prin- 
ciples of Jesus Christ? That was the salient subject of the address 
made in chapel hour on Thursday morning by Dr. Francis Rose, pro- 
fessor of Biology in the Central College of the Philippines. Dr. Rose 
is advantageously situated at Iloilo, the exact center of the Philip- 
pine Islands, to observe the far-reaching developments of the Orient. 
The Nothern tip of the Philippines is only iflfty miles distant from 
the Southern coast of Japan, the powder barrel of the East, and is in 
plain view from that point on a clear day according to Dr. Rose. 

"Things happen suddenly in the East," Dr. Rose emphasized, 
~ pointing to China, where suddenly war- 



RECITAL ATTRACTS 
SMALL AUDIENCE 

Five recitalists made their first ap- 
pearance on the second student recital of 
the year Tuesday evening before a small 
but appreciative audience. 

James Ralston, pupil of Benjamin 
Owen, opened the recital with the First 
Movement of Haydn's Sonata in C 
sharp Minor. Christine Yoder, mezzo- 
soprano, pupil of Alexander Crawford, 
sang "The Star," by Rogers; "The 
Roses," by Gilberte; and "The Year's 
at the Spring," by Beach. Russel 
Hatz, violinist, pupil of Harold Malsh, 
played all of Handel's Sonata in E. Sara 
Light, pianist, pupil of Mrs. Bender, 
played "The Girl with the Flaxen Hair," 
by Debussy, and "Ballade in G Minor," 
by Chopin. Robert Clippinger, organist, 
pupil of R. Porter Campbell, played 
"Carillon," by Delamarter, "Legend of 
the Mountain," by Karg-Elert, and 
"Echo," by Yon. 



George Smeltzer Kalo 
Anniversary President 

Dinner-Dance at Hotel Her- 
shey; All-male Cast For 
Anniversary Play 



George Smeltzer, President of the Se- 
nior Class, was elected Anniversary 
President of Kappa Lambda Sigma Ja- 
nuary 8. Smeltzer was elected by the 
society from a group of twenty eligible 
Senior men. In George the organization 
has selected an able man to fulfill this 
all-important position for a short but 
important time in the society's calendar 
of events, for upon the Anniversary 
President depends the success of the 
most outstanding activity of the society. 

The annual dinner-dance will be held 
at Hotel Hershey March the 20th, and 
will climax the Sixtieth Anniversary 
Program of Kalo- Friday, March 19th, 
Kalo will present its annual play, prob- 
ably a production with an all-male cast. 
The traditional informal dance will fol- 
low the presentation of this play. 

President Smeltzer has appointed the 
following committees to prepare the An- 
niversary program : — Dinner — Arthur 
Heisch, chairman, Richard Smith, Luth- 
er Immler, Clarence Aungst. Dance — 
Homer Barthold, chairman, William 
(Continued on Page 4, Column 1) 



lord Chiang Kai Shek had been kid- 
napped and just as abruptly released- 
Chiang is the stabilizer in China and the 
far East, and his spiriting away might 
have involved all of us, as might any of 
the mysterious events of the Orient, Dr. 
Rose stated. 

For example, when Japan made her in- 
cursion into Manchukuo, British and 
American oil interests were squeezed out, 
furnishing a plain casus belli had we 
been so disposed. In actuality we re- 
mained passive throughout the whole 
Manchukuan affair and kept cool. 

This, in fact, has been generally the 
policy of America in the far East. Dr. 
Rose stated that he had occasion to con- 
tact a secretary to a prominent officer in 
the Pacific fleet. He was assured from 
that source that the United States will 
not pick a fuss with any nation; that, 
on the contrary, the U. S- will do all it 
can to avoid a quarrel, especially with 
Japan. If, however, such a conflict 
should arise, it will be a defensive war 
on our part, fought off our Pacific 
Coast, and not in Japanese waters. 

The Philippines would be abandoned, 
Dr. Rose further learned from the naval 
officer. The United States would prob- 
ably concentrate its efforts in the Ha- 
waiian Islands, where defense has pro- 
ceeded much further than in the Philip- 
pines, so that this group could hold out 
against invasion for six months, he as- 
serted, without outside communications. 

On the other hand, Philippine prepara- 
tions, while intensive, are utterly hope- 
less, Dr. Rose averred. The Philippines 
have only six bombers, against which the 
Japanese could perhaps produce 600. 
Military education is spreading fever- 
ishly in the schools, to the detriment of 
scholastic activities. School buildings 
are converted into barracks during the 
summer, Dr. Rose asserted, and students 

(Continued on Page 4, Column 1) 



President Cancels 

Florida Engagement 

President Lynch was forced to can- 
cel his trip to Florida because of con- 
tinued illness. Dr. Lynch was sched- 
uled to preside at the Florida An- 
nual Conference of the Church of the 
United Brethren in Christ at Tampa 
from January 14 to 17. He was to 
substitute for Bishop G. W. Bat- 
dorf, who, at present, is touring the 
mission fields. 



f 



PAGE TWO 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, JANUARY 14, 1937 



ESTABLISHED 1925 

A weekly publication by the Undergraduate Stu dents of Lebanon Valley College 

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 

Richard A. Baus, '37 
MANAGING EDITOR ASSOCIATE EDITORS 

Edgar Messersmith, '37 William H. Earnest, '37 

ASSISTANT Louis E . straub , '37 

Boyd Shaffer, 38 

EDITORIAL BOARD 
SPORTS EDITOR FEATURE EDITOR 

William H. Earnest, 37 Louise Stoner, '38 

REPORTORIAL STAFF 

Mildred Gangwer, '39 Conservatory 

Duey Unger, '37 Kalozetan 

Alice Richie, '39 Delphian 

Kenneth Eastland, '37 Philokosmian 

Grace Naugle, '37 Xlionian 

Harold Beamesderfer, '37 Ernestine Jagnesak, '38 

Karl Flocken, '37 W anda Price, '38 

Eleanor Lynch, '37 Calvin Spitler, '38 

Harold Phillips, '37 Theresa Stefan, '38 

Clifford Barnhart, '38 William Clark, '39 

Elizabeth Bender, '38 Thomas Guinivan, '39 

Sylva Harclerode, '38 U-bert Long, '39 

Samuel Rutter, '39 

• BUSINESS BOARD 
BUSINESS MANAGER CIRCULATION MANAGER 

Robert Kell, '37 Elwood Needy, '37 

ASSISTANT ASSISTANT 

Curvin Bellinger, '38 Ernest Weirick, '39 

Single Copies 5 cents 

Subscription ?1.00 per year 

Entered at the Annville, Pa., post office as second class matter, under the Act of 
March 3, 1879. 

Published weekly through the school year, except during holiday vacation and 
examination week. 



Clio Holds Final 

Semester Meeting 



REPRESENTED FOR NATIONAL ADVERTISING BY 

National Advertising Service, Inc. 

College Publishers Representative \ 
420 Madison Ave. New York, N. Y. 
Chicago - Boston • San Francisco 
los angeles • portland - seattle 



Vol. XIII THURSDAY, JANUARY 14, 1937 



No. 18 



LET THE WORM TURN 



Tomorrow night at 7 :30 Clio will hold 
its final meeting of the semester in Clio 
hall. The meeting will combine business 
and social activities. Under the compe- 
tent direction of Hazel Heminway, pro- 
gram chairman, the Committee has 
planned a lively evening of entertain- 
ment and fun. This meeting is intended 
to be a precedent for the Friday night 
meetings of next semester ! 



SOPH HOP TURNS 

TO PIRATE PRANCE 



(Contiimed from page 1) 



It Isn't Done 



"A man cannot turn anything over in his mind unless he knows it; he should 
therefore know something." A consideration of this statement, which is attributed 
to Mr. Schopenhauer, leads us to wonder just what percentage of the students here 
will be in a position to turn over something in their minds at the conclusion of the 
lirst semester's work. Will the exams next week bring to light what has been 
learned, or will they provide only an advantage for the crammed individual to un- 
burden himself of the multitude of facts and figures he has been accumulating since 
last September? What has been learned, we are told, will never be forgotten. A 
thing, then, which has been definitely learned is so integrated with the personality 
that the individual would be incomplete without it. It is part of the person. 

One of the common vicious practices of college students is to store up ideas in 
the mind's reservoir against examination time, 'these ideas, like the seed which the 
sower inadvertently let fall in stony places, lack the opportunity to gain a firm 
rootage. They are as so much baggage, carried along with a great deal of labor, 
only to be disposed of with a final desperate effort on the day when the blue books 
are passed around. Had these ideas been gathered not as a prerequisite to a hol- 
low-sounding degree, but witli the purpose of their assimilation into character and 
personality, then the individual who harbored them would have felt adventure 
rather than ennui. 

"The purpose of education," some great man has said, "is not scholarship, but 
manhood." Therefore, if a man should lose the former and still gain the latter the 
world might well rise up and call him blessed, but the saddest sight is that of the 
individual who has scorned both the former and the latter, and doesn't realize 
his loss. 

As the semester exams loom ahead, let us hope that those who will not be able 
to turn anything over in their minds will at least have the genius necessary to turn 
over a new leaf! 



PROGRESS IN VOTING? 



Members of the electoral college met recently in the capitals of their respective 
states and went through the empty formality of easting their votes for presidential 
candidates — 523 for Franklin I). Roosevelt and 8 for Alt". M. Landon. Under this 
antiquated and costly electoral college system President Roosevelt, polling approx- 
imately 27,750,000 votes, received 523 electoral votes, Governor Landon polling ap- 
proximately l(i,()80,000 votes, received S votes. Each Roosevelt electoral vote rep- 
resents the desires of 53,000 voters. Each Landon vote represents the wishes of 
2,085,000 voters. 

These figures prove beyond a doubt that there is something radically wrong 
with the electoral college system. Not only have voters for the minority candidates 
been disregarded in computing the final results, but also the electoral votes repre- 
sented by them are cast for their opponents. 

A number of senators and representatives in Congress arc advocating a consti- 
tutional amendment which is to change this system whereby state electoral votes 
would be divided among presidential candidates on the basis of their relative popu- 
lar vote strength in the states. 

This system, substituting the pre ent "horse and buggy" electoral college sys- 
tem, in the proposed amendment should receive the support of all intelligent voters 
providing the amendment is brought before the states for ratification. 



pipe out of his aperture sometime during 
the first half hour of observation and 
opine that he can get them to you with- 
out fail two weeks hence — no earlier. If 
you swear a little he may relent a couple 
of days. 

And aside from the extra ticket busi- 
ness, there is the affair of the thumb- 
tack or why she jumped off a ten-foot 
ladder, the business of the crepe paper 
and a few thinks like the problem of who 
lias the extension cord. These maddening 
little ways that things do have are chief- 
ly noticed by the decorating committee 
who say that, whether one likes it or not, 
they are determined to make a "Pirate 
Prance" out of the thing. 

They claim that it will be quite safe, 
however, because the cut-throats who 
originally had been hired to enliven the 
gathering have been unavoidably detain- 
ed at Hangman's Yard. A new outfit is 
being trained with all available rapidity, 
and are expected to look pretty fero- 
cious, though, if they get through their 
dress rehearsal all right tomorrow. 

It is also learned from reliable sources 
that the orchestra — the Harrisonians — 
have refused to carry dirks in their 
teeth; an impasse was broken only when 
they compromised on toothpicks. Their 
objection to the dirks was a trifle obvi- 
ous — they absurdly enough seemed to 
think it might get in the way of their 
instruments, thus showing that they do 
not appreciate the importance of pre- 
serving an authentic effect. (We know 
it's authentic; we saw it in the movies.) 

A reporter from this paper inter- 
viewed Howard Baier, president of the 
Sophomore class, to see whether he had 
any idea concerning how far the class 
would run into the red on the business. 
"Red!" said Mr. Baier, "I refuse to 
consider it! I fear we have already vio- 
lated that tradition." 

"But, Mr. Baier," remonstrated La 
Vim's man, "you don't mean you expect 
to turn a profit? This tradition has nev 
er been broken, you know." 

"Sir," replied Mr. B„ "this class is in 
the hands of first water tradition grind 
ers in the dust." 

All trends, in fact, seemed to confirm 
Mr. Baier's optimistic viewpoint, espe 
dally the sale of tickets, which has been 
treated upon heretofore. These neces 
saries, it is perhaps superfluous to add, 
may be obtained from members of the 
Sophomore class who will personally 
guarantee that the dane will start at 
the usual hour. As the boys behind the 
planner said, "You bring 'er — we'll swin 



FACULTY NOTES 



The waiters had hardly finished hurl- 
ing the soup at us at lunch last Monday 
(you know — soup: "It looks like rain. 
Yeah, and it tastes like water) when we 
observed Lois of the Harbolds squinting 
iixedly at the neighboring faculty table. 
The prospect of a faculty-member in the 
act of surrounding a bowl of soup was a 
little too much for her. We even be- 
came absorbed ourselves. "You know," 
she said, nodding at Prof. Campbell's 
nifty work with the soupspoon, "I can't 
hear him from here, but I'll bet he's pro- 
ducing some swell Rippling Rhythm!" 
• 

"Archibald," I said to him as we 
strolled the campus, "what manner of 
headgear is that I see perched so pre- 
cariously upon yon dome to which is ap- 
pended the craggy physiognomy?" 

"That is a hat, Mahster," said Archy. 
"It is a blue hat. It is a horrible hat; 
in fact, it is ghastly! Bellinger calls it 
a Homburg hat. Give him a set of land- 
ing-gear. And a propeller. And he would 
resemble an autogyro!" 

"Verily, Archy, have you ever heard 
of the Little Bird That Set On Nellie's 
Hat?" 

"Yea, Mahster — shall we give him the 
Bird?" 
We gave him the bird. 

• 

. . We don't think it's too late to let 
you know that during the campus pre- 
sentation of "The Messiah," someone 
made a neat job of lifting and making 
off with Prof. Butterwick's wallet. 

. . Incidentally (and parenthetically) 
the Guy With The Blue Homburg is not 
taking Louise (Hiya, Hal!) Saylor to 
the Soph Hop, contrary to current opin- 
ion. She's going with Jake. 

. . And we view with alarm the cur- 
rent eruption of Wally Simpson coiffures 
(hairdresses to youse and youse) here- 
abouts. It has even invaded the Men's 
Dorm — where one hears the smart slain- 
mings of the circuit breakers in the fuse- 
panels as the boys plug in their curling- 
irons. 

• 

Something wrong with the fruit-flies 
used in the genetics course. Heredity 
has apparently produced a pampered 
strain — which refuses to eat anything 
but Brer Rabbit Molasses (Advt.). Prof. 
Light swears by it. Awright, he recom- 
mends it highly, then. 

And Shay brang a bat (extremely de- 
funct) back from X-mas vacash. To be 
mounted and placed in the Bio. Museum. 
It's a shame that he didn't bring two of 
them: then we might have had the sub- 



NOTICE 

Due to the fact that La Vie 
is as equally susceptible to exan^ 
lions as the rest of the student! 
publication will be temporarily ^ 
pended over that period. The ^ 
issue of the paper will app ear ^ 



ruary 4 



!ar Feb- 



lime pleasure of making the""~i^p>. 
crack about "Bats in the belfry 
can see the Ed. gleefully cranking i 
pencils through the sharpener' 



tie. 



Well, what did we tell you about p 

Thingumabob and His Six Whatsj s \ 

our favorite campus orchestra? 

they not terrific? Did they not slap 

flatter than a waffle? And we arpn-f 

, . , en t fool, 

ing when we requested your sug geS f 

for a name for the boys; turn 'em 

Phil Lester — he won't bite! Or 



m to 
\v e ']] 



start an editorial crusade against th. 
alarming local prevalence of dorma^ 
gray-matter, etc! 



The third-floor literati were seated i 
Solemn Bull-Session. The topic unde 
consideration: current magazines. "G ea 

iny 



tlemen," said Mahatma Clark, "it j S 



well-founded opinion that Corone 
merely an emasculated version of E t 
quire." Such profundity followed by 
heavy cogitation and furrowing of brows 
Then: "Ya mean," drawled 
Thompson — "it's sexy?" — ViUiann. 



GEORGE SMELTZER KAL0 
ANNIVERSARY PRESIDENT 



(Continued from page 1) 



Black, George Yokum, Warren Brown. 
Favor — Duey Unger, chairman, John 
Brosious, Marshall Frey, Robert Smith. 
Play — -Wilbur Leech, chairman, Charles 
Kinney, James Miller. Tickets and Pro- 
gram — Edgar Messersmith, chairman, 
Edward Bachman, Elwood Needy, Eu- 
gene Shenk. Alumni — John Gongloff, 
chairman, David Byerly, Robert Heck- 
man. 

jiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiriiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiniiii 

Duke University 

SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 
Durham, N. C. 

Four terms of eleven weeks are given 
each year. These may be taken consecu- 
tively (graduation in three and one-quar- 
ter years) or three terms may be taken 
each year (graduation in four years). l ne 
entrance requirements are intelligent: , 
character, and at least two years of col- 
lege work, including the subjects specifleu 
for Grade A medical schools. Catalogs 
and application forms may be obtame 
from the Dean. 



immiiiiimiiiiiiiiimimiiwiimi milium""' 111 """ 



him 



Yesterday, January 13, Dr. A. H. M 
Sltmeciper attended a meeting of the 
Conference of Church-Belated Colleges 
of the United States. Today and tomor 
row he will attend the sessions of the 
Association of American Colleges. Both 
groups will meet at the Hotel Willard 
in Washington, D. C. 

* * * 

Dr. S. H. Derickson has been confined 
to his bed by /" Wrippe since last Thurs- 
day. He hopes to be out by the time this 
issue is released. 




Sure, the quickest way to 
get there is by telephone. 



• Rates are reduced on Long D* 8 * 
tance calls ALL DAY SUNDAY 
and after seven every night- 

THE BELL TELEPHONE COMPANY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



enti^ 

this v 

plentj 
a nd « 
set sh 
presei 
will si 



At 

men s 
aceou 
D o lit 
into 1 



the fii 
and 1 
eight 
gatior 

F. & 
togetl 

being, 
were 
the be 
after 
and s 



Hoi 
Flyinj 
fidenc 
and ( 
hurrie 
distan 
of tin 
ing pi 
ahilitj 

Dui 

the B] 

urablj 

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forty : 

tion-si 

this Is 

•'emn 

to be i 

dition. 

this ci 

Myites 

more 

Antivi 

forced 

Pymna 

athleti 

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to sec 

tat 

dure i 

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have i 

th <! da 

coitipe 

eetirt 

the sc 

s tand 

*i» b( 

fe gar<3 

^n, 

The, 
a s ue c , 
*Mon 

V , 

I* 

the thj 

He , 

H t , 

% 
Si 



fi 



at? 

us. 
est 



blue. 



Phil 
is's^ 
Were 

1 you 

fool, 
stioiy 

into 
we'll 
1 the 
'niant 



ed i n 
under 
"Gen- 
is my 
et i s 
f f?»- 
d by 
)row s , 
'undit 
»■. 



ENT 



rown. 
John 
smith, 
harles 
I Pro- 
irman, 
r, Eu- 
ngloff, 
Heck- 



insecu- 
3-quar- 

taken 
3). The 
igence, 
of col- 
aecifled 
talogue 
btaineo 



P 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, JANUARY 14, 1937 



PAGE THREE 



ort Shots 



defend^ champions of the East- 
Tll > nsylv ania Collegiate league gave 
e r» 1 e elIen t account of themselves in 
t% l ■ night's encounter against the 
$^ lT putchmen and undoubtedly stand 
W* 8 * hiffh chance of repeating last 



& " V " „rformance in snaring top league 
f ear's P er 



With a starting five composed 
[T f veterans, the Diplomats can 
nt ' r " n the floor one of the smoothest- 
>' ace . f a st-passing combinations that 
^writer has seen in many years. Ev 



* lS W *"ber of the original outfit showed 
$ m e ability at handling the ball 
d shooting, 



both on one-handed and 
Jlia hots, and the nattily-attired champs 
SCt gnted a well-drilled court outfit that 
Sustack up as tou 8 h °PP°s ition for an y 



a ll-college team in the East. 



*t the same time, the Flying Dutch- 
showed plenty of stuff on their own 
unt and will certainly be heard from 
'^little before the league season passes 
•°t history. A team that can flash an 
'"tick such as that which the Valleyites 
staged during the last eight minutes of 
the first nalf must n0t ^ e counte( * down 

d out too soon. During those final 
eight minutes the Blue and W T hite aggre- 
ation matched the smoothness of the 
5? & M. outfit and passed and worked 
together in a slick fashion that had the 
Diplomats on their heels for the time 
being. At the same time, the Valleyites 
were playing nice defensive ball, snaring 
the ball off the opposing bankboard time 
after time to halt the F. & M. offensive 
and start a drive of their own. 
* * • 

However, during the second half, the 
Flying Dutchmen seemed to lose con- 
fidence and the attack lost its fine edge 
and consisted largely of nervous and 
hurried pokes at the basket from long 
distances when the Dutchmen had plenty 
of time to get themselves into real scor- 
ing position and had demontrated their 
ability to penetrate the F. & M. defence. 



During the second half, the wearers of 
the Blue and White seemed to tire meas- 
urably, and it has been suggested that 
the team as a whole is not in shape for 
forty minutes of fast action on a regula- 
Uon-size court. The reason advanced for 
this lack of extra energy does not con- 
demn the courtrnen themselves, who seem 
lo be making every effort to keep in Con- 
xion. Rather, it places the blame for 
'his condition on the fact that the Val- 
ieyites work out so seldom, generally not 
" lor e than once a week, on the large 
teVille High School floor and are 
forced to scrimmage in the small college 
Rmnasiurn. It might be well for the 
at hletic heads to give this idea consid- 
eral) le thought, and make every effort 
to ^cure a larger court for more fre- 
^ Uen t practices. An alternative proce- 
ure suggested is to have the schedule 
Practices continue as at present, but 
( , Ue a lengthy running drill included in 
e da ily workouts. Such a drill would 
^pensate for the lack of intensive 
drilling and would tend to keep 



squad in better condition to with- 

w ill h t}lC grue * in 8 contests which they 
U g ex Pected to win if they are to be 
forded as a contender for the league 



Thpj-o „ 

t s Ut . ms to 1)e Plenty of hope for 
s eas ^ essful Lebanon Valley College cage 
*X ' an< * if the team can obtain a bit 
fry, t , e ° nfl dence, polish, and extra ener- 
ttic t , e P, ying Dutchmen should be in 
|J lck of the fight all the way. With 
itig t^ >er ' ence an d more practice dur 
s ho„u Conii ng weeks, the Valleyites 



n °uld 



stand a 



n g th 



very good chance of sur 



e F - & M. outfit when the two 



the ^ Illeet a # ain at Lancaster. In 
ill k atlti,lle ' however, the Valleyites 




av e to 



concentrate on Ursinus and 



Ur g and be prepared for tough 



struggles all along the line in league 
competition. 

* # * 

The Frosh opened their season in re- 
erse by dropping decisions to the Her- 
hey Industrial School quintet and the 
\ & M. Frosh on Friday and Saturday 
tights of last week. The H. I. S. team 
losed out the Greenies by a 20-19 count 
11 a close game played at Hershey, while 
the F. & M. first-year men found little 
difficulty in submerging the Valleyites 
by a substantial margin. In each game 
the starting lineup presented Whitman 
nd Friel at the forward posts, Geesey 
at center, and Artz and Kleinfelter at 
the guard positions. Seiverling, Schaef 
fer, Grimm, and Colgan also saw service 
for the Valley yearlings in their first 
ncounters. 

* * * 

At the moment, the Seniors seem to 
have an edge over the other clubs in the 
interclass league by virtue of their win 
on Monday night over the second-place 
Tuniors in a wild and woolly game 
played on the ice-box court. Trego and 
Kinney did some fancy shooting from 
all corners of the court for the Seniors 
to lead the assault in a game which never 
was particularly close insofar as the 
score itself was concerned. 

* * * 

The history of the college league as of 
press time, Wednesday noon, presented 
the following scores and standings: 

Drexel 32; Muhlenberg 24. 

F. & M. 51; Ursinus 24. 

Drexel 30; Albright 25. 

F. & M. 61; L. V. C. 38. 

Gettysburg 42; Ursinus 14. 

Standing of the Clubs: 

W. L. Pet. 

F. & M 2 1.000 

Drexel 2 1.000 

Gettysburg 1 1.000 

Lebanon Valley 1 .000 

Albright .'. 1 .000 

Muhlenberg 1 .000 

Ursinus 2 .000 



L, V, C, QUINTET LOSES 

TO DEFENDING CHAMPS' 



(Continued from page 1) 



a field goal on a set shot from the foul 
line, and Martin added another point 
when Paul Billett was detected hipping 
the opposing guard. Snodgrass broke 
into the scoring column by counting from 
the field after breaking up a Blue and 
White pass in the back-court. Frey, 
Landers, and Martin missed foul tries, 
and Frey netted another two-pointer on 
an overhead shot from sidecourt. Snod- 
grass netted a peep shot on an F. & M. 
tap-off play and tallied another point 
on a foul called on Brown on the play- 
Sponaugle and Snodgrass missed free 
throws called on Frey and Rozman, but 
Sponaugle got away on a peep shot to 
run the Diplomat advantage to 20 to 8. 
At this stage of the game, Snell replaced 
Rozman in the L. V. C. lineup, eight 
minutes of the first half remaining. 
Hummer was detected pushing Ed 
Kress, but the Valley forward missed the 
free try. Landers then fouled Snell and 
the latter converted the single chance. 
Brown failed to net another penalty try, 
but the Lebanon Valley attack started to 
flash real speed and Paul Billett netted 
two field goals in rapid succession on 
nice passes from his mates. Snell regis- 
tered a long shot and Ed Kress tallied 
another twin-pointer for L. V. C. on a 
set shot from the foul line. Brown 
chalked up a foul charged against Land- 
ers, and another field goal by Captain 
Paul Billett deadlocked the count at 20- 
all as the Valleyites rallied beautifully. 
Snodgrass got away for two successive 
goals on pivot plays under the basket, 
but the Blue and White converted four 
straight foul chances to deadlock the 
count at 24-all at half time. Landers 
hacked Snell in the act of shooting and 
Martin was guilty of the same offense 
when Frey attempted to stick one up 



Inter-Class Standings 

Won Lost Percent 

Seniors 3 1.000 

Juniors 2 1 .(567 

Frosh 1 2 .333 

Sophs 3 .000 



underneath the basket, to give the Blue 
and white their chances from the fifteen- 
foot mark. 

Second Half 

Franklin and Marshall came back af- 
ter the intermission with an avalanche 
of field goals that netted them thirteen 
straight points before L. V. C. could 
again break into the scoring. Martin 
netted a nifty one-handed stab from side- 
court as the teams again went into ac- 
tion, and Stew Snodgrass flashed bril- 
liant form to net three successive left- 
handed pokes after short dribbles to the 
left of the forecourt. Clair Snell, who 
had left the game early in the second 
half in favor of Rozman, returned at 
this point to substitute for Bob Brown 
at a guard position. Asplin and Spon- 
augle netted field goals and Snodgrass 
converted a foul before Lebanon Valley 
scored again, this time on a foul con- 
version by Paul Billett. Frey netted a 
charity toss called on Martin, and Kress 
counted a field goal from sidecourt, but 
Sponaugle and Hummer each counted 
once for the Diplomats and Asplin count- 
ed twice on fast-passing plays to in- 
crease the champions' lead to 45-28. 
Kroske entered the game replacing Ed 
Kress at this point. Sponaugle and Hum- 
mer registered another pair of field goals 
for the F. & M. outfit, and Raymie Frey 
netted a follow-up shot for L. V. C. 
Tony Rozman counted a long two-point- 
er and Kroske sank two fouls called on 
Sponaugle as the Valleyites momentarily 
rallied. Asplin slipped away from Roz- 
man for two points, and Kroske con- 
verted one of two foul chances called on 



Hummer. Snodgrass got away for three 
more field goals as the Diplomat passes 
continued to click with perfect timing, 
and Billett counted an overhead field try 
for L. V. C as the defending champs as- 
sumed a lead of 57-37. Snodgrass count- 
ed one of two fouls called on Snell, and 
Hummer counted a field goal and a foul 
when Raymie Frey was detected hacking 
the F. & M. captain in the act of shooting. 
It was Frey's fourth personal and 
Johnny Speg and Bob Brown entered 
the L. V. C. lineup, Snell also retiring 
from action. Sponaugle was detected 
fouling Paul Billett under the basket and 
the F. & M. center also left the game 
via the four-foul route. Billett convert- 
ed one of the two chances to bring the 
score to the final figures, 61 to 38. 

The summaries : 

F. & M. 

G. F. T. 

Snodgrass F 11 3 25 

Landers F 113 

Asplin F 408 

Sponaugle C 6 12 

Stewart C 000 

Hummer G 4 2 10 

Martin G 113 

Totals 27 7 61 

L. V. C. 

G. F. T. 

P. Billett F 4 2 10 

Kress F 204 

Kroske F 033 

Frey C 5 3 T 3 

Rozman G 102 

Brown G oil 

Snell G 1 3 5 

Speg G 000 

Totals 13 12 38 

Fouls attempted : L. V. C, 21 ; F. & 
M., IQ- 



What They Say 



Question — Should girfa hitch-hike? 



WANDA PRICE, Junior I guess 
nice girls don't hitch-hike, but you've 
got to get some place — that's what the 

Madame always says. 

* * * 

MARTHA FAUST, Senior— Yes, pro- 
vided that they exercise a little discrimi- 
nation. 

* * * 

JAMES MILLER, Senior— No, espe- 
cially not at night. 

REPORTER— Why not? 

MILLER (suddenly seized by suspi- 
cion) — For no reason I could tell you 
for publication. 

* * • 

CHARLES BROWN, Sophomore- 
Yes, if they can get a ride on their face. 
* * * * 

WILBUR GIBBLE, Junior— That de- 
pends upon who's hitch-hiking, when 
they're hitch-hiking, where they're going, 
and who picks them up. 

BELLE MULHOLLEN, Senior— No, 
in general; but I do think it is all right 
for girls to hitch-hike from here to Leb- 
anon because they are definitely known 
to be college students. 

* * * 

MARJORIE SMITH, Senior— Yes, if 
they have no other means of transporta- 
tion and if it's not too far. 

* * * 

PAUL CUNKLE, Jwnior— Absolutely 
not. The majority of the drivers on the 
road are men. Male hitch-hikers don't 
flag women; but girls, if they want to 
get a ride, have to take their chances 
with the men. The most scrupulous of 
men won't pick up women. 

G E R TRUDE ELLENBERGER, 
Sophomore — Yes, I do. Maybe it's be- 
cause I am not supposed to do it. I ad- 
mit that you take a risk, but I think it's 
fun. 




STEEL. 
TOMAHAWK PIPE 



R 

THAT COM Bl Si ATI OKI 
TOMAHAWK AND PIPE 
THE INDIANS USED 
MUST HAVE SMOKED 
If HOT 



PROBABLY-A 
METAL BOWLtS 
RATHER 
PRIMITIVE J" 




AS A MATTER 
OF FACT, MY 
PIPE SMOKES 
HOT AS BLAZES 



YOUR PIPE WOULD 
BE O.K. WITH THE 
TOBACCO BUILT 
FOR COOLNESS- 
PRINCE ALBERT 




SOUNDS PRACTICAL, 
JUDGE 



SURE IT IS. PA. IS, 
SCI ENTI FICALLY X CPJ MP CUT 
— IT PACKS SNUGLY IN 
a A PIPE - SMOKES MILD 
s=n AND MELLOW — 




WHAT'S MORE— P. A. 
NEVER BITES THE 

TONGUE THERES 

JOY GALORE INI THAT 
TASTY P. A. FLAVOR 



EACH PUFF ADDS 
VOLUME TO YOUR 
~i STORY JUDGE 





MEN! ENJOY PRINCELY SMOKING- WITH ^ 
PRINCE ALBERT* F.A. TOBACCOS ARE MILP 
ANP MELLOW. P.A. SMOICE5 COOL .„\Y6 'CRIMP 
CUT: ANt? P. A. POESN'T BITE THE TONfrUE. 
FRINCE ALBERT IS THE NATIONAL JOY $MOK£ ! 



NCE ALBERT MONEY-BACK GUARANTEE 

e 20 fragrant pipefuls of Prince Albert. If you don't find it the mellow- 
tastiest pipe tobacco you ever smoked, return the pocket tin with the 
the tobacco in it to us at any time within a month from this date, and 
refund full purchase price, plus postage. 



(Signed) R. J. REYNOLDS TOBACCO COMPANY 
lem, North Carolina 



pipefuls of fra- 
grant tobacco in 
every 2-ounce tin 
of Prince Albert 



Winston-Salem 

Prince Albert 




PAGE FOUR 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, JANUARY 14, 1937 



EXAMINATION SCHEDULE 


NOTE — First semester examinations this 


German 16 — Dr. Lietzau. 


year will begin at 8:30 and 1:30 


History 24-A. 


o'clock. All exams will be held in 


o.6\) 


the chapel unless indicated other- 


wise by professor. 


Krhirntion 124 


WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 20 


Education 123. 


o .OKI 


T^.rlii fntion 472 


Itiilliurv 1ft 


1 Mn 1 ntinnli v 2Ti 


Iiiology 4*8. 


Plivci^t; 1ft 

JL 11 1U« 


Philosonhv 02 


Political Science 114. 


X mOV 


1:30 


XJIU1C It 1 , 


English 42. 


Bible 82. 


Greek 16. 


Latin 64. 


Mathematics 36. 
Mathematics 46. 


THURSDAY, JANUARY 21 


Sociology 13. 


8:30 


Biology 64. 


WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 27 


Chemistry 48. 


8:30 




Biology 28. 


r reucn oo. 


Business Administration 73. 


History 126. 


Education 13. 


Philosophy 102. 


VJicCl^ uu. 


Political Science 16. 


inistory 


1:30 


Latin 33-A. 


Hygiene 12. 


Mathematics 113. 


Psychology 14. 


Mathematics 56. 


tinTr\ A ~\.T T A \TTT A T% "V CiCt 

FRIDAY, JANUARY 22 


1:30 


8:30 


Chemistry 28. 


English 26. 


History 34- A. 


Education 136-A. 


History 42. 


Psychology 33. 


Mathematics 13. 


1:30 


THURSDAY, JANUARY 28 


Chemistry 54. 


8:30 


Education 82. 


Business Administration 14. 


English 16. 


Chemistry 38. 


English 512. 


English 152. 


History 24-B. 


French 36. 




German 16 — Scientific. 


8:30 


Mathematics 74. 


French 06. 


Political Science 52. 


r rencn lo. 


Psychology 52. 


French 26. 


German 26. 


MONDAY, JANUARY 25 


History 16. 


8:30 


History 64. 


Bible 26. 


Physics 44. 


Biology 13. 


Chemistry 18. 


FRIDAY, JANUARY 29 


Economics 26. 


8:30 


English 66. 


Business Administration 36. 


History 44-B. 


Greek 26. 


Latin 26. 


History 44-A. 


1:30 


Latin 16. 


Bible 62. 


1:30 


Business Administration 143. 


English 524. 


German 06. 


German 56. 



POLITICAL SITUATION 

DISCUSSED BY SPEAKER 



{Continued from page 1) 



are disposed to cut classes in order to 
practice ordnance. 

There is, nonetheless, a possibility that 
Japan may be so busily occupied with 
the ursine threat of the North, Russia, 
that the Empire of the Rising Sun will 
not be extended to the hapless isles of 
the South. Japan fears a Red invasion, 
Dr. Rose declared, quite as much of 
propaganda as of arms. The poor in Ja- 
pan are desperately poor, and the rich 
are few. As a result, the soil is a fer- 
tile one for Red propagandization. An- 
other result is Japan's most rigid cen- 
sorship. Of a great number of journals 
and magazines only a comparative few 
gain ingress into the Island empire; the 
remainder are tossed into the sea in 
transit. 

China awaits this Russo-Japanese war 
to rid herself of Japan's imperialistic 
yoke, Dr. Rose was informed by an at- 
tache to the Chinese consulate in the 
United States. China is not despondent he 
affirmed, but is rebuilding her devastat- 
ed sectors. Recently a grou p of Japanese 
Christians visited such a scene of deso- 
lation in China, Dr. Rose related. As 
Christian brothers they tearfully im- 
plored pardon for the havoc of their 
armies in the Chinese invasion. They 
were freely forgiven. 

The spirit manifest in this episode is 
the only ultimate ray of hope emanating 



Frosh Cabinet Entertains 



On Wednesday, Janaury 6, at 3:30 
the Freshman Y Cabinet entertained 
the large Y Cabinet at a tea in Nort u 
Hall Parlor. Louise Saylor, presi- 
dent, and Lucille Maberry, adviser 
to the Freshman Cabinet, were the 
hostesses. After the guests had spent 
some time playing games, Jeanne 
Schock sang two soprano solos, 
"Morning," and "Grandma." She was 
accompanied by Mary Ann Catronio. 
Esther Wise played a piano solo, 
"Sea Nymphs." The Freshman girls 
then served tasty refreshments. 



from the cloudy international skies. 
"War is no preventive of war; war is 
no security against war." Christianity 
and universal fraternity offer the true 
solution. "Against nationalism we have 
placed the spirit of Jesus on such a penu- 
rious scale," lamented Dr. Rose. Had 
we attacked the problem on a larger 
scale war would be impossible, he con- 
cluded. "The final issue is whether we 
are to be ruled by military dictators, or 
whether the principles of Jesus and 
world brotherhood will rule the world." 



The Prohibitionists expect to have the 
Dry Laws re-enacted by 1946. Also that 
the lobby for the suppression of breath- 
ing is likely to do great things toward 
reducing the carbon dioxide content of 
the atmosphere. 



Lieber Herr Timbuctoo ! 

Duerfen wir Sie um einen kleinen Ge- 
fallen bitten? Wir moechten Ihre Zeit- 
ung als Propaganda-verbreiter gebrauch- 
en ! 1 ! Aber nein, wir wollen nur eine 
gewisse Geschichte bekannt machen (das 
Wort Propaganda fuehrten wir nur da 
hinein um etwas Aufsehen zu erregen). 
Die Geschichte aber ist naemlich die: 
ein armer Kerl sagte uns neulich dass er 
schwer beleidigt worden sei indem man 
ihn vor mehreren Wochen Poet nannte. 
Seitem war der Aermste fast ausser 
sich und wusste sich nicht zu helfen bis 
ihm gluecklicherweise, mitten in der Wut 
und Glut der Verzweiflung ein erret- 
tender Gedanke einfiel, worauf er zu 
sich sagte: "Warum beweise ich nicht 
dass ich es nicht bin?" Und da setzte er 
sich hin und schrieb das folgende Un- 
geheuer : 

Wenn ich am grauen Spaetherbstabend 

Einsam durch den Garten gehe 

Und die nackten Baeume sehe, 

Hagere Arme gen Himmel streckend — 

Denk' ich dann an alte Greise 

Die in ihrer Lebensreise, 

Ehe sie empor sich recken 

Innehalten, nicht behende, 

Warten auf das oede Ende. 

Besten Dank dass Sie dieses haben 
drucken lassen denn wir glauben damit 
einer Seele die Ruhe gebracht zu haben. 
Ihr Freund 
Haensel Heifer. 



John JVess Leads L. W. R. 
Jonestown Deputation 

At the new and beautiful edifice of the 
Jonestown United Brethren Church on 
Sunday evening, January io, the Life 
Work Recruit Deputation had a most 
successful service. John Ness in his talk. 
The Challenge of Christ, had as his cen- 
tral theme that the challenge of Christ 
is a call to service, to progress, and to 
perfection. His text was found in Phi- 
lippians 3:14. Edith Metzger had charge 
of the service; Dorothy Yeakel, Doro- 
thy Zeiters and Daniel Shearer provided 
the music for the service. 



SENIORS DEFEAT JUNIORS 

GET TOP PLACE IN LOOP 



(Continued from page 1) 



For third year men, Frey played the 
dominative role, denting the cords for 
18 points. This defeat, the Juniors first, 
relegated them to second place. 

In a game played last Thursday night, 
the Frosh deflated the Sophs in a score 
of 53-43 with Thomas of the Sophs and 
Foreman of the Frosh playing the lead- 
ing roles. 

A knowledge of the dates of future 
games may be gained by consultation of 
the revised schedule on the bulletin 
board. 

The summaries: 



Seniors 



Trego F 
Kinney F 
Heisch C 
Bachman 1 
Loose G .. 
Unger G 



21 6 48 



Juniors 





G- 


F. 


T. 




3 


3 


9 




2 


2 


6 




8 


2 


18 




1 


1 


3 




1 


1 


3 




15 


9 


39 



Girls meet in Friendly Hour 



Last Sunday evening at 5 :30 a 
group of girls met in North Hall 
Parlor for Friendly Hour. Hazel 
Heminway, who had charge of the 
program, read the Scripture lesson. 
Isabel Cox sang an appropriate so- 
prano solo, accompanied by Ruth 
Buck. "New Year's Resolutions" was 
the topic of the timely talk given by 
Lucille Maberry. She took each let- 
ter in the words New Year and used 
it as the key for a resolution which 
she urged the girls to keep for the 
following year. 



PROFESSOR CRAWFORD 

SECURES NEW MACHINE 



(Continued from page 1) 



The equipment is of Fairchild-Proctor 
make, and is boxed in two leather trunks. 
Besides the mechanism for receiving 
sound, transmitting it to aluminum discs, 
and reproducing the sound again, there 
is an adjustable microphone that looks 
very much like those seen in radio broad- 
casting station. 

The ideal situation would be the re- 
cording of instrumentalists' work as well 
as singers', to have student teachers 
hear themselves teach before they face 
a class, to have faculty members hear 
themselves addressing the student body. 
These may come with Utopia. At pres- 
ent the step taken in the voice depart- 
ment is commendable and praiseworthy. 



DIEHL DRUG CO. 

103 W. Main St., ANNVILLE, PA. 

Cut Prices on 
Cosmetics 
Hospital Supplies 
Dental Preparations 
Shaving Necessities 
Fountain Service 
"Visit the Safe Place" 
Magazines 
We fill Prescriptions 



Compliments of 

A. & P. STORE 



C. H. SHEARER, Mgr. 



DI NUNZIO 
SHOE SHOP 

"Our Motto is to Please" 
A Trial Will Convince You 
9 E. Main St., ANNVILLE, PA. 



PEGGY'S BEAUTY 
SHOP 

Special on Frederick Permanent 
Waves 

$4.00 $6.00 

2 blocks West on Sheridan Avenue 



D.L. 

SONS 

Contractors 

Lumber and Coal 

ANNVILLE, PENNA. 



RENU SHOP 

One Day Service 
Dry Cleaning, Pressing, Rep a j Tin 
11 E. Main St. ANNVILLE, pA 



KREAMER BROS. 

Furniture 
Floor Coverings 
Electric Refrigerators 
Hoover Electric Sweepers 
Electric Washing Machines 

RCA Radios 
FUNERAL DIRECTORS 
Phone 144 ANNVILLE, Pa 



John Hirsh Dept. Store 

Men's Leather and Wool Jackets 
Wool Mackinaws 
Weyenberg Shoes 
Phone 145 9-11 W. Main St. 

ANNVILLE, PA. 



For School Supplies and 
Books of all Kinds Go To: 

BOLLMAN'S 

628 Cumberland Street 
LEBANON, PA. 



Meals Served Daily 

Best Sundaes in Town with 
Home Made Ice Cream 
Sandwiches, Cigarettes, Candy 

C. D. BRUNNER 

E. Main St. ANNVILLE, PA 



! A Delicious Breakfast 



Cream Filled 
Doughnuts 
FINK'S BAKERY 

Annville, Pennsylvania 



CLOTHING OF QUALITY 

J. S. BASHORE 



Lebanon 





25 c 

"Cosmopolitan Lunches 
A treat in store 
for you 

THE PENNWAY 



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shofl 
recei 
full 
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talk 
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funn 
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Red Cross Dance j 
Saturday Night j 




j Come and CooperaU 
Be Benevolent 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 




ANNVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 1937 



No. 19 



Kiss Frances Kaiser 
Gives Travel Talk 



ENGLISH POEMS 



RECITES 

Club Members Delighted As 
Eight Year Old German 
Girl Performs 

T ] ie members of the German Club 
, m ed how well they had survived the 
ecen t examinations by turning out m 
* U H force to enjoy an unusual program. 

Jliss Frances Kaiser, aged eight, of 
Berlin, Germany, gave an interesting 
talk about her journey from Germany 
to America. She told of several of the 
funny occurrences which do happen on 
ocean voyages and interspersed her 
speech with spontaneous witticisms and 
puns such as the play on the words 
"dock" and "dog." When she had fin- 
ished her travel-talk by bringing herself 
to the place where she then was, she re- 
cited some of the English poems which 
she had learned during her six-weeks' 
visit in this country. Miss Kaiser also 
sang numerous quaint German songs 
which she made more comprehensible for 
some of the non-German speaking guests 
and more delightful for everyone, by her 
expression and her appropriate ges- 
tures. 

The versatile little Fraulciri joined 
lustily in singing "Ei I)u Schoene 
Sehnitzelbank" which, although she had 
never seen before, was soon memorized 
l>v her, the forty-odd verses notwith- 
standing'. This is a feat which ranks 
second only to her rapid learning of the 
English language. 

After all of the above mentioned 
throat-punishment "Puschi" and almost 
everyone else was ready for refresh- 
es. Miss Goyne, whom the cruel 
"Schnitzelbank" had "gestrafed" at the 
P'ano, and Calvin Spitler who, as lead- 
er ' na d vainly tried to move his pointer 
,IS ra pidly as the energetic tongues of 
" le singing Teutons, were in especial 
ne ed of nourishment. Help came quick- 
,v, however, in the form of delicious 
Jjcoamalt and cookies, served by Sylva 

Harelerode, Esther Flom, and" Betty 
Uerney. 

ln "social situation" which then 
"failed Miss Kaiser further enter- 
I ri,e group by telling the mem- 
| jf S about those features of American 
^ which were most interesting to her. 
n me o'clock the meeting was ad- 



w ith a feeliii"- of admiration for 
" c b] 



left 



and the members and guests 



Heh "^' e German girl who is so 
1 a * ea Se in a si range country. 



Soph 



omore Class Elects 



The 



s emi-annual elections took 
T am ° ng the Sophomore class on 



Ma 



ce 
1 Ue sdav 

y > ^eb. 2, bringing with them 
Ray- 
was chosen President ; 
e 



ne * offi, 
on 

ft. 



•non c- Cers t0 re P lace the old 
1 smith 



thy v eicIman > Vice President ; Doro- 
Yeak el, Secretary; 



^Psey, Tr 



ls trati 



easurer. 



and Carl 
The former ad- 



qui tted ; 10n under Howard Baier ac- 
rna na " tSelf quite creditably in the 
Pirtio, i ment of class affairs, and in 
lUal § ' Presentation of the an- 
of Hci als ° Ph Ho P' The recently elected 
4ct 'vitv facin S a period of great 

s s 



m Preparation for the func- 
tn eir class in the coming 



Nella Miller Heard 
In Splendid Recital 

GIVES THREE ENCORES 



Appreciative Audience Ap- 
plauds Style and Art of In- 
structor 



Nella Miller, pianist, heard in re- 
cital Monday evening after a year's leave 
of absence from Lebanon Valley Con- 
servatory, filled and surpassed expecta- 
tions of a large audience of friends, as- 
sociates, and pupils. 

Miss Miller is a former pupil of Carl 
Friedberg and the renowned Olga Sama- 
roff-Stokowski. In 1933 she was grad- 
uated from Juilliard Graduate School of 
Music, N. Y. City ; and in 1934 received 
a B. S. degree from Teachers College, 
Columbia University. Since 1933 she 
has been an instructor of piano here. 

The recital opened with the "Andante 
with Variations in F Minor" by Haydn, 
followed by three selections from 
Brahms, the "Capriccio," "Intermezzo," 
and "Rhapsodie in E flat Major." After 
a short intermission the program con- 
tinued with the "Nocturne in B Major" 
and "Scherzo in B Minor" from the 
work of Chopin. The three final selec- 
tions were quite enthusiastically re- 
ceived. These were "'Three Bagatelles" 
by Tscherepnine, "Fountain of Acqua 
Paola" by Griffes, and "Dance Macabre" 
by Saint-Saens-Liszt. 

This recital is one in a series of such 
performances that Miss Miller is ac- 
customed to give each year. These af- 
fairs are always thoroughly enjoyed by 
her many friends and associates. 



1938 Quittapahilla 
Progresses Rapidly 

Shaffer and Dellinger Cooper- 
ate in Making Book an Out- 
standing Publication 



During the past several days, work on 
the 1938 "Quittapahilla" has been going 
at top speed. Staff assignments have been 
coming in on schedule, the "Quittie" 
photographer has been working on the 
campus for some time, and the shipment 
of materials to the Canton Engraving 
Co. has already begun. 

From all outward indications this 
year's annual is preparing to set a new 
standard for such publications at Leb- 
anon Valley College. The Editor, Curvin 
Dellinger, has revealed the choice of a 
cover, which it is hoped will be a strik- 
ing asset to the general beauty and 
originality of the book. It consists of a 
red and black design, bearing an em- 
bossed outline of the Administration 
building on its face. The general outline 
of the book also embodies the latest 
and most novel trends in year book de- 
sign. Dellinger has been devoting a great 
deal of time and energy to this work and 
together with his staff, which has also 
responded admirably, he hopes to pro- 
duce a book that will meet with the ap- 
proval of students, faculty, and friends 
of the college. 

Paul Ulrich, the photography editor, 
has been one of the busiest men on the 
staff for the past week. Cooperating with 
(Continued an Page 4, Column i) 



Tryouts To Be Held 
For "Gold In The Hills 



Tuesday noon th:- \,'ig and Buckle 
Dramatic Club held their first meeting 
this se '.-.ester. The progra n for the 
doming ;e.ne ter was fully discussed with 
stress upon the presentation of "Gold 
in the Hills." It was de i ed that this 
humorouj two-act play would be pre- 
sented in the near future with a small 
admission fee to cover expenses. Presi- 
dent Phillips placed before the members 
the proposition of selling tickets for the 
Hedgerow Players' presentation of 
"Twelfth Night" on April 7. '1 he mem- 
bers, although willin r to he p, felt that 
they would be too busy wi'h their own 
production. Tryouts for the club's plaj 
will be held in the next week. 



I.RX. Makes Plans 
For Active Week 

SPEAKERS SCHEDULED 



Mrs. Kaiser - Harnisch To 
Speak Tuesday; Miss Rie- 
gelman I. L. O. Staff Mem- 
ber Thursday Speaker 

At the regular m* ting of the Inter- 
national Relations Club, next Tuesday 
evening, February 9, Mrs. Margaret 
Kaiser-Harnish, a citizen of Germany, 
will address the club members. She ar- 
rived in the United States last month 
and has been travelling and lecturing 
extensively in several eastern states. It 
will be remembered that Mrs. Kaiser- 
Harnish last year appeared in chapel 
and presented an interesting discussion 
on Germany to the student body. She 
will speak to the club on present econo- 
mic conditions with special reference to 
Germany. The German Club will be the 
guests of the I .R. C. at this meeting. 

A special meeting of the club will be 
held two days later, February 11, when 
Miss Carol Riegelman will be the speak-, 
er. Miss Riegelman is a staff member of 
the International Labor Office in Geneva, 
and has been sent to the United States 
to help in organizing the International 
Textile Conference to be held in Wash- 
ington during April. She has been se- 
cured by the Carnegie Endowment to 
speak to the local I. R. C. She is well 
informed on all phases of the work of 
the International Labor Organization 
and will talk informally on labor and 
international labor relations. She is a 

(Continued on Page 3, Column 5) 



MacMullen Elected 

Senior President 



After a rather noisy meeting of the 
senior class Tuesday noon, second se- 
mester class officers were elected. The 
only contended office was that of presi- 
dent) the nominations for the other of- 
fices being closed when one nominee was 
elected. "It was a close battle," quoted 
one of the observers, '"da Nort Hall 
:rowd swung the election." After the 
renzied mob quieted down, the follow- 
ing were elected: President, Francis 
William MacMullen; Vice President] 
Maxine Panic Barley; Secretary, Lois 
Marie I l irbold; Treasurer, Gracie Ma- 
rie Naugle. 



Lebanon Valley Surprises 
Pennant-Aspiring Bullets 

GETTYSBURG HANDED FIRST SETBACK 

Tony Rozman Nets Follow- Up Shot In Final Fifteen Seconds 
Of Play To Snap G-burg Victory Streak; Paul Billett, Ray- 
m e Frey Star 



Lebanon Valley's Flying Dutchmen fought a scrappy uphill bat- 
tle against the overconfident Gettysburg Bullets last Saturday night 
on the Lebanon High School court and handed their foes their first 
defeat of the season, in a thrilling finish. Tony Rozman netted a 
follow-up shot in the last fifteen seconds of play to give! Valley- 
ites a two-point marg.n of victory at 39-37. 

The Getty sburgians dominated play during the opening minutes 
of action and sported a 10-point lead (before the Valley ites had regis- 
tered a single counter. Raymie Frey took the lid off the L. V. C. 
basket with a tap-.'n shot midway in the first half, and from that 
point on the Blue and White quintet out- 



played the highly-touted Bullets. By 
half-time the Metoxenmen had cut the 
lead of their foes to four points at 16-12 
and aiter eight minutes of the final half 
had been ticked away, Paul Billett broke 
away to deadlock the count on a field 
goal after Tony Rozman had broken up 
a Bullet down-court passing attack. L. 
V. C. continued to click and seven min- 
utes later sported a three-point advan- 
tage, 34 to 31. Gettysburg rallied for 
three successive two-pointers to again 
place the highly-rated Bullets in front, 
but Paul Billett sank one of two free 
throws and Raymie Frey netted two 
more charity tosses without further ado 
to deadlock the count and set the stage 
for the final game-winning twin-counter 
chalked up by Tony Rozman. 



. A. A. Net Candidates 
Report For Practice 



r 1 a y e r s Represent Various 
•Groups ; basketball r lay 
Day Planned 



Several girls have reported as bas- 
.ccball canoiaatej tor ihis season. For 
..e past month ibe.e lias been practice 
,,i maerent groups repiesenting North, 
West, South Hall, and day students. 
The tournament among these various 
groups will begin, this week. 

No varsity team will be chosen, since 
it is not the policy of the W. A. A. to 
emphasize varsity competition, but rath- 
er to give everyone a.) opportunity in 
an intramural sports program. Plans 
re tie.ng formed for a Basketball Play 
Day to be held March 6 on this campus. 
Cedar Crest, Susquehanna, Shippens- 
ourg, and possibly Dickinson and Get- 
tysburg will participate. If possible, two 
games are to be arranged with Albright, 
and also one game with Moravian. 

The White Elephant Sale will prob- 
ably be dropped, since the date is now 
rather late and plans for the 1 lay Daj 
will be occupying the W. A. A. Cabinet. 



Y. W. Plans For Mothers 

The Y. W. C. A. cabinet has an- 
nounced that its annual Mothers' Day 
week-end will be held on March 6-7, 
the same time as Play Day. Plans 
have already beep begun to make this 
week-end a most entertaining one 
for the mothers and the girls as well. 



Captain Paul Billett and Raymie Frey 
tallied fifteen and fourteen points re- 
spectively in the brilliant win, and Ralph 
Billett and Rozman combined to total 
ten counters. Held to one field goal in 
the opening half, Lebanon Valley's cap- 
tain broke loose in the second half and 
was one of the important factors in the 
great Blue and White rally. Bob Brown 
and John Speg each played nice floor 
games from their guard positions as the 
opposing forwards tallied only four 
times from the field in the close contest. 
Weems, visiting guard, focused his eagle 
eye on the basket from long range and 
netted five sensational twin-counters to 
lead the attack of the losers with thir- 
teen points. 

In the opening surge of the Bullets 
Fish, Weems, and O'Neill counted from 
the field and Fish and Weems each 
counted twice from the fifteen-foot stripe 
to account for ten alien tallies before 
Frey broke the ice for L. V. C. with a 
neat tap-in poke. Ralph Billett, subbing 
for Ed Kress at forward, netted a one- 
handed stab, but Weems retaliated with 
another sensational long shot. Bommer 
converted a pair of foul tosses and Tony 
Rozman counted a follow-up from the 
hands of R. Billett. O'Neill made it 16 
for Gettysburg on a long shot, but Frey 
tallied two neat twin-counters, one a 
one-handed poke and the other a long- 
range shot that parted the cords cleanly, 
and Paul Billett registered his first field 
goal on a follow-up try to bring the 
L. V. C. total to 12 as the half ended. 

At the start of the second half Weems 
again came through with a long-range 
shot and Fish converted a foul toss to 
change the G-burg total to 19. Ralph 
Billett counted on a spectacular over- 
head follow-up, Paul Billett netted a 
tap-in, and Frey registered the Blue and 
White's eighteenth point on a one-handed 
poke from the foul circle. Bommer 
counted a foul for the Bullets, and 
Lewis, lanky blond guard made it 22 for 
Gettysburg on another long shot. Paul 
Billett netted a pivot poke from the side 
and broke away for another field goal on 
a dribble-in to tie the count. Lebanon 
Valley continued their rally as Tony 
Rozman and Frey registered field goals, 
but Bommer and Weems counted from 
the charity line and Bommer sank a long 
-:hot to again tie the score. Bob Brown 
retired from action via the four-foul 
route and Speg replaced him at guard 
for L. V. C, nine minutes of play re- 
maining at this stage of the game. Bom- 
{Continued on Page 3, Column 3) 



p 



PAGE TWO 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE. THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 4. 1937 



2ia li? (tlaUrgtetttt* 



ESTABLISHED 1925 



A weekly publication by the Undergraduate Students of Lebanon Valley College 



EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 
Richard A. Baus, '37 



MANAGING EDITOR 

Edgar Messersmith, '37 
ASSISTANT 

Boyd Shaffer, '38 



ASSOCIATE EDITORS 
William H. Earnest, '37 
Louis E. Straub, '37 



EDITORIAL BOARD 
SPORTS EDITOR FEATURE EDITOR 

William H. Earnest, '37 Louise Stoner, '38 

REPORTORIAL STAFF 

Mildred Gangwer, '39 Conservatory 

Duey linger, '37 Kalozetan 

Alice Richie, '39 Delphian 

Kenneth Eastland, '37 Philokosmiax 

Grace Naugle, '37 — Clionian 

Harold Beamesderfer, '37 Ernestine Jagnesak, '38 

Karl Flocken, '37 Wanda Price, '38 

Eleanor Lynch, '37 Calvin Spitler, '38 

Harold Phillips, '37 Theresa Stefan, '38 

Clifford Barnhart, '38 William Clark, '39 

Elizabeth Bender, '38 Thomas Guinivan, '39 

Sylva Harderode, '38 Robert Long, '39 

Samuel Rutter, '39 

BUSINESS BOARD 
BUSINESS MANAGER CIRCULATION MANAGER 

Robert Kell, '37 Elwood Needy, '37 

ASSISTANT ASSISTANT 
Curvin Dellinger, '38 Ernest Weirick, '39 



Student Theme 

AS LIFE WAS 



Single Copies 5 cents 

Subscription 31.00 per year 



Entered at the Annville, Pa., post office as second class matter, under the Act of 
March 3, 1879. 

Published weekly through the school year, except during holiday vacation and 
examination week. 



REPRESENTED FOR NATIONAL ADVERTISING BY 

National Advertising Service, Inc. 

Calleft Publishers Represevtativ* I 
420 Madison Avk. New York. N. Y. 

CHICAOO - BOSTON • SAN FRANCISCO 
LOS ANOILIS • PORTLAND ■ •■ATTLB 



Editorial statements are not necessarily the consensus of opinion of the 
student body or administration. They are merely the opinions 
of the student editor unless otherwise indicated. 



Vol. XIII 



THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 1937 



No. 19 



SIT-DOWN STRIKE 



We've been hoping that by the end of the first semester those few people who 
were responsible tor the suspension of Friday morning musical programs would 
apologize as requested so that the rest of us might be able to listen to "something 
different" at least one day a week. 

This prevailing unfortunate situation is doing more harm than good. The 
artists who derive the ultimate benefits by gaining experience in appearing before 
a packed and critical house are the ones, not the student body, who are being in- 
jured the more. 

It is hoped that those assorted hecklers who were responsible for the sit-down 
strike still in progress at the conservatory were among those who did not register 
for the secoad semester. 

If, however, some of these offenders are as yet selling their wares around 
these parts we suggest that they apologize to the offended artists so that the re- 
maining 99 percent of us might have the privilege of appreciating and enjoying 
Friday morning musical programs. 

If this suggestion does not bring about a peaceful settlement we further sug- 
gest that the Senate take the initiative and by "all powers at its command" induce 
these hellions to apologize so that the artists may again derive their rightful bene- 
fits and the student body may again enjoy the Friday morning musical programs. 



ALUMNI NOTES 



Last Saturday evening at six o'clock 
Henry Grimm, '35, and Beatrice Miller, 
of Annville, were united in marriage 
by Dr. W. A. Wilt. The ceremony, which 
took place in the local church, was wit- 
nessed by members of the immediate fa- 
milies and close friends. Mr. Grimm is 
teaching mathematics in the New Cum- 
berland High School this year. 



• » • 



Miss Mary Margaret Brace, '34, re- 
cently resigned her position with Straw- 
bridge and Clothier, of Philadelphia, to 
go to Pittsburgh where she has accept- 
ed a position in the diocesan offices of 
the Episcopal church. 

• • • 

Mr. John Lyter, '14, and his wife an- 
nounced the birth of a daughter on Jan- 
uary 3. 



• • • 



Milton E. Donough, formerly of the 
class of '02, and who has been living in 
Lebanon, died last week. He was buried 



in the Mt. Hope cemetery at Myerstown, 



» • • 



W. J. Wogan, '33, and Miss Smyser, 
of York, were married last Saturday. 



* » # 



January 18 a baby, Martha Jean, was 
born to Albert Kazlusky, '33, and his 
wife, the former Haidee Blubaugh. The 
Kazluskys live at Pottsville. 



• • • 



Amos W. Herrmann, '07, York Coun- 
ty lawyer who prosecuted 14 year old 
John Curry eight years ago, has soft- 
ened and now says he favors a parole 
and would not oppose an absolute par- 
don. Curry, Herrmann believes, was led 
blindly into the "hex" slaying of a York 
witch doctor when he was too young to 

realize the importance of the deed. 
• • • 

Miss Mae Hoerner, '10, who has been 
Professor of Home Economics at Otter- 
bein College, Westerville, Ohio, since 
'25, has been commissioned by the Wo- 
men's Foreign Missionary Society of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church to teacli 
Domestic Science at the Crandon Insti- 
tute, Montevideo, Uruguay. 



1 was a round, roly-poly baby when 
my father first saw me. He called me 
his little chipmunk and fairly burst with 
pride over his only daughter. My big 
brother, ten, and glowing with import- 
ance, decided upon first glimpse of me 
that 1 was going to be a pest, most cer- 
tainly. When he later had to wheel me 
up and down the street on days when he 
wanted to play baseball, he became con- 
firmed in his convictions, and to this 
day calls me "The Pest." I find it quite 
satisfying to bring up the subject of his 
wounded masculine pride and ooze sym- 
pathy. Such a procedure is usually worth 
a doll or at least to me so, one can find 
me at odd moments cornering him and 
fairly seething in the enjoyment of the 
situation. 

It appears that I was an extraordin- 
arily active chipmunk. At the brave age 
of ten months I shocked completely all 
the neighbors by riding lickety-split 
down the hill to the foot of our street 
on my little kiddie-car. J ust at the point 
of the curb I would stop with great cun- 
ning, turn the little car, and toddle back 
up, barely able to contain myself until 1 
could reach the top and sail delightfully 
down again. 

As I grew from the reckless stage of 
the kiddie-car 1 became a confirmed 
doll-breaker and top-ruiner. I was, how- 
ever, a most gentle pussy patter and, as 
I was extremely fond of animals, I was 
given a blue-eyed, cuddly, tiger kitten. 
We still have the little button and string 
I used to dangle from my fat little hands 
to liis excitable furry paws. 

One Easter, when I was three, some 
one gave me a stuffed bunny. They say 
that for a year and a half that bunny, 
'till it just shriveled with age, was never 
out of my sight and rarely out of my 
arms. I earned it wherever I went, it 
sat with me at the table, it leaned on 
the edge of the tub while I bathed, and 
it slept tightly clasped to me at night. 
When mother washed it and hung it out 
to dry I would stand out in the yard un- 
der the line, my eyes fixed on it, calling 
her every five minutes to see if it were 
dry. 

At the age of five I was a whirling 
tempest of mischief. One lovely after- 
noon my mother left one of my little 
friends and me alone while she chatted 
with one of her friends. Having out 
grown the mud pie stage, I felt it was 
indeed the psychological moment to 
make a large, lu.sicous, creamily frosted 
cake; so, with a glitter in my eye, 1 feli 
upon an enormous mixing bowl. Then 
we set out upon our first great culinary 
attempt. It seems that we were extra- 
ordinarily perverse children, choosing 
for the scene of our seance the middle 
of my mother's beautiful bed. We gath 
ered flour, sugar, spices, milk, raisins— 
in short, we emptied mother's shelves 
and, at last, seated on her bed with the 
mixing bowl between us and with food 
stuffs strewn around, we began to pour 
and stir. Into that bowl went every con- 
ceivable concoction, and, as the sticky- 
mass grew, we became consumed with 
zeal and stirred with our two spoons 
'till the whole mass was flowing over the 
top. 

In the midst of our joy and stickiness 
my mother returned to sense, as she 
neared her bedroom, the gorgeous aroma 
of spices and chocolate. She stopped at 
the door, speechless and horrified at the 
sight which greeted her eyes. Peihaps it 
is sufficient to say that my little friend 
left shortly after and I became extreme- 
ly unhappy. 

Early one gray morning I was routed 
out and taken to school. Strange to say 
my life for the next two years remains 
a blank to me. I can remember only 
that blocks in kindergarten bored me 
and that my maid delighted me extreme- 



.y l»y skipping ail the way to school with 
.lie mornings. 

Having always been an unusually good 
child in school, in the third grade 1 sud- 
denly ran amuck. One day 1 became 
unbearably disgusted, stuck my hand in 
the air, marched out of the classroom 
and down to the corner for a cone. Such 
a thing was unprecedented in the an- 
nals of the school. The principal was, I 
am sure, convinced that 1 was a budding 
criminal. Quite a furor was raised, and 
my parents tripped down and held con- 
ferences with the teachers. Then life 
again became hum-drum and common- 
place. 

As the years passed, six, seven, eight, 
nine, I ran the gamut of pets. Dolls al- 
ways struck me as extremely limp, stu- 
pid things, so I turned all my attention 
to my pets. We had white mice, guinea 
pigs, turtles, salamanders, a small alli- 
gator my uncle had sent me from the 
south, a parrot which ultimately became 
so annoying with its tactless jargon that 
we had to part with it, several birds, 
cats and two dogs. 

My first cat, Squiffer, was a gorgeous, 
affectionate Persian tiger at whose death. 
I nearly went insane. Ever since her ad- 
vent all our cats have been Persian ti- 
gers. Bobby, my spitz, was my closest 
companion through childhood. The alli- 
gator became, after a few years, too 
large for comfort. He slithered from 
beneath the furniture at odd moments 
and snapped at people's feet, so we sent 
him back to his slimy southern waters. 
The guinea pigs squeeked, munched on 
grass, and then they, too, migrated, this 
time to a farm where there was room 
for them. The fish are still with us, as 
are the salamanders, but no longer are 
they in the same bowl, as the salaman- 
ders snapped at and killed two gold-fish 
when they were together. 

As time flew I became one of the big 
girls in the eighth grade and considered 
myself immensely wise. Grammar school 
soon faded into the obscure blue of past 
memories, and I suddenly stood half 
questioning, doubtful, yet triumphant, 
and smug in my new first pair of high 
heels on the threshold of my high school 
days. 



PROF. STOKES HEAlJ 
MERGED COMMITTEE; 



The adminstration has r „ 
merged the Summer School and T? ' 
sion Work Committees under the 



manship of Prof. Milton L. g^" 
1 'la ns have been made to have a su * S ' 
school in Annville and possibly an Ct 
ening extension course in Harrisb^ 
this summer. The program calls f ^ 
larger number of professors and ai/ * 
creased eurricular offering. Xhe s 
mer School Catalogues will probabl 
released the end of February or the^ 
ginning of March. 



FACULTY NOTES 



nch, 



A senior is, after all, a freshman 
whose asininity can be discussed seri- 
ously only in his absence. 



Many psychologists now believe idiocy 
largely a state of happiness and content- 
ment. Look how college students enjoy 
life. 



On Friday, January 22, Drs. Ly 
Stonecipher, and Reynolds attended 
meeting of the College Presidents' ^ 
sociation at the Penn Harris Hotel 
Harrisburg. One of the important to 
ics discussed was the proper division of 
labor of teacher training among libera] 
arts and state teachers' colleges. A sur 
vey of the member colleges reveals that 
in scholarship assistance and self-help 
jobs the liberal arts colleges have done 
most. 



Dr. A. H. M. Stonecipher preached at 



the revival services at Cleona 



recently, 



* * • 



Dr. R. R. Butterwick attended the 
inauguration of President John A. Mac- 
kay of Princeton University last Tues- 
day' morning. 

Sunday .morning Dr. Butterwick will 
preach at the First U. B. Church of 
Palmyra. 

» » • 

On Monday Dr. H. H. Shenk ad- 
dressed the Hershey Civic Club on the 
topic, "Lincoln." 

Last Thursday Dr. Shenk addressed 
the seniors of South Whitehall Town- 
ship. He has recently made a number 
of similar addresses in neighboring high 
schools, urging the seniors to continue 
their education. 

• • • 

Prof. S. O. Grimm attended the ses- 
sions of the School Directors' Associa- 
tion of Pennsylvania which was held at 
Harrisburg Tuesday, Wednesday, and 
Thursday of this week. 

• » « 

Dr. G. A. Richie has been preaching 
at several revival meetings recently. 
Last Sunday he preached at Cleona and 
the week before he was at Mountville. 




"And furthermore, ladies and gentle- 
men, rates on most out-of-town calls 
are greatly reduced ALL DAY SUN- 
DAY and after seven every night." 

• Going home for the week-end? 
Arrange your trip by telephone. 

THE BELL TELEPHONE COMPANY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



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LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 1937 



PAGi£ THREE 



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a 

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in 
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hat 
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subject for today's La Vik ser- 
js: Why all the heeling? Get- 
Bullets, with their attention 
^ on another league crown for 
ffl cUi * tc iefield institution, certainly did 
t!ie - y the lacing handed them by the 
uutchinen Saturday night, and 
WP 8 , ye vent to their feelings in no 
^ tain fashion as players, coaches, 
u" ce eC t a tors joined in the chorus of 
-j^c on each occasion when the 



jerries 



refs 



called the Gettysburgians for a rule 
aC tion. Certainly the unsportsman- 
' ntra outbursts were uncalled for, and 
i ^ justification in fact or fancy 



Observe: 



the Gettysburgers stepped to 



foul line for no less than twenty-six 

tlie f • heaves at the basket, while the 
jiar'v i j _i 



Flying 
tries 



Dutchmen were awarded eleven 



from the free throw mark. The 
ttysburgers were called for viola- 
06 of the travelling rule on about 
l ' jnS t tne occasions when the Bullets 
I t o shufflin' and truckin' around in 
backcourt. The inLegrity and com- 
tence of lieis uorger ana bolter are 
Lfainlv aoove reproach, lor these two 
udfciais have been in great demand to 
e aJ uruuers in s^ne oi the fastest 
Ih school and college games played in 
lllis section of the state for several 
ars . Can it be that our worthy oppo- 
nents can't take it:- As Anthony saiuto 
Uievpatra or somebody or other in Cae- 
n's time: "l J ride coineth before a 
fall." Or something like that. At any 
rate, the lesson is obvious. Kemember, 
0-burg, the less you beef and the more 
you play, the better everyone concerned 
„iil like it. 

» * • 

Random thoughts — The Flying Dutch- 
men may have lost the First .battle of 
Gettysburg, but they certainly defend- 
ed ihe fort bravely to repulse the en- 
emy invasion in the Second Battle of 
Gettysburg. . . . The Battlefield Boys 
weren't togged in khaki uniforms, but 
certainly such apparel would have 
matched their temperaments very ap- 
propriately. 

• • • 

La Vie Mystery ette-Of-The- Week: 
How can anyone be as good as a cer- 
tain Gettysburg center called O'Neill 
deems himself and yet miss eight suc- 
cessive free-throw chances in an im- 
portant cage game? Furthermore, how 
do you account for the fact that Rayinie 
Fr ey, covered so capably by O'Neill, 
ln e Great, slipped away for no less 
than six field goals? Answers will be 
presented by the sports department on 
Page five of the next issue of La Vie. 



It 



is rumored that the latest ballet 



Production of the Gettysburg back- 
COurt agists is to feature as its out- 
Ending S ong hit that old musical fa- 
l0rit e, "TraveUin'." . . . Last week the 
|* at times seemed so enthralled by 
e intricate steps taken by the Gettys- 
^g'ans that they stood entranced, un- 
e to halt the performance. We sup- 
"! e that they figured that, after all, 

UAH _ 



Blue And White Five 
Loses To Drexel Tech 



Matt Donaldson Stars As 
Drexelites Rally To Over- 
come L. V. C. Lead 



isn't 



every day that you can see such 



Methods 



Q tly devised and supremely novel 



°f taking steps while advanc- 



| he ball down-court. So why disturb 



the ball t 

dancers in their rehearsal? 

The * # * 

t an 6 Gett ysburg attack featured long- 

fa re C Sni P e rs, a sort of guerilla war- 
Co^ ° to s Peak. However, their fore- 
the Vance s were poorly executed. On 
"io te * r hand > the Valleyites adhered 

Hutu ly to the rule: Don,t shoot 
J ri(l th ° U See the whites of their eyes, 
%:d Snort -range attack was exe- 
^ett Vsl) ^ lth devastating results. The 

J ltlej able 

r Psho wlu>n these two uncanny 
' ***** started clicking 



\ yS ^ gers forgot that Billett and 
t even have to aim in order 
lna rk and their defenses were 



Suffering a let-down after their great 
win against Gettysburg last Saturday 
night, Lebanon Valley's courtmen went 
down to defeat at the hands of Drexel's 
quintet at Philadelphia on Monday by a 
39-33 count. Matt Donaldson, brilliant 
Drexel captain, led his mates in a last- 
half rally that provided the Drexelites 
with their margin of victory. 

The Valleyites loked good at the start 
of action and stepped away to a lead of 
ii to 5 before the Philadelphians began 
to click, and the Blue and White quin- 
tet still sported a three-point margin at 
the intermission, the score favoring the 
Valleyites, 16 to 13. 

L. V. C. increased this margin to 
seven points after fifteen minutes of the 
second half had passed, but during the 
last five minutes of play the Technolog- 
ists rallied to overcome the L. V. C. 
advantage as Paul Billet and Bob Brown 
were forced to retire on personal fouls. 

Donaldson stole the individual scoring 
honors with six field goals and four foul 
conversions for a total of sixteen points- 
For L. V. C. Paul Billett netted ten 
points and Ralph Billett and Raymie 
Frey each counted eight points. The Blue 
and White trailed their foes, 16 to 12, in 
field goals but outcounted the Drevel- 
ites from the foul line, 9 to 7. The Val- 
leyites registered nine out of fourteen 
charity tries, while the winners counted 
on but seven out of eighteen. 
The summaries : 

Lebanon Valley 

G. F. T. 

P. Billett F 3 4 10 

R. Billett F 328 

Kress F 000 

Frey C 408 

Rozman G 102 

Brown G 3 3 

Snell G 000 

Speg G 1 o 2 



The 



Ue 



Hi 

* 8 (, ertainl 



and White win over Get- 
y was gratifying to L. 



Totals 12 



33 



Drexel 

G. F. T. 

Curry F 306 

Donaldson F 6 4 l & 

Bennett F ! 1 o 2 

Kulesh F 000 

Layton C 3 6 

Lignelli G 1 1 3 

Rhile G I 1 

Nannos G 2 1 S 



Totals 16 



39 



V. C. supporters, and it is unfortunate 
that the Valleyites were called upon to 
oppose the Drexelites and the Muhlen- 
bergers with such short periods of rest. 
The Flying Dutchmen attack bogged 
down considerably toward the close of 
the Philadelphia contest as the locals 
dropped a close decision on Monday. 
The results of last night's contest could 
not be learned before La Vie went to 
press. 



Freshman Class Election 

At its semi-annual meeting for the 
election of officers, the Freshman 
Class selected the following persons 
to fill its executive posts: President, 
Jack Moller; Vice President, Louise 
Saylor; Secretary, Lillian Leisey; 
and Treasurer, William Bender. This 
is the second successive term that 
Mr. Moller has filled in the above 
office. The Class is at present con- 
templating various activities which it 
will undertake upon becoming more 
thoroughly organized. A dance is to 
be planned in the near future. 



Interclass Basketball Standings 

Points Fouls 

Won Lost For Against Goals Fouls Missed 

Seniors 4 o 214 124 99 16 15 

Jiuniors 3 1 146 122 63 20 26 

Freshmen 1 3 139 193 64 11 37 

Sophomores 4 116 176 49 18 41 

10 LEADING SCORERS 

Games Goals Fouls F. Missed Total 

Trego 4 24 4 5 52 

Frey 4 20 6 3 46 

Heisch 4 19 1 2 39 

Donmoyer 3 18 2 38 

Foreman 2 17 3 7 37 

Gasteiger 4 15 5 8 35 

Capka 4 14 5 5 33 

Thomas 3 14 3 H 31 

Kinney 2 12 5 2 29 

Pefflcy 4 12 4 9 28 



LEBANON VALLEY SURPRISES 
PENNANT- ASPIRING BULLETS 

(Continued from page 1) 

mer came through with a long shot and 
Lewis counted a foul to put G-burg 
ahead at 29-26. Paul Billett stuck one up 
one-handed from the foul circle, but 
Weems negatived the effort with an- 
other long shot. The Blue and White 
captain again counted from the field, this 
time on a set shot from sidecourt, and 
L. V. C. took the lead on Raymie Frey's 
sixth field goal of the game. Paul Bil- 
lett took a nice pass from his brother 
Ralph under the basket for another twin- 
counter as the Valleyites led, 34-31, with 
five minutes to go, O'Neill netted a 
dribble-in field goal, but blew his eighth 
straight chance from the foul line when 
he was given the opportunity to dead- 
lock the count. Fish and Weems slipped 
away for sleeper shots to place G-burg 
ahead at 37-34 with a minute and a 
half of play remaining- Weems com- 
mitted his fourth foul and was ban- 
ished from action, Paul Billett netting 
one of the two foul chances awarded 
him. O'Neill was detected hacking Frey 
in the act of shooting and the L. V. C. 



center calmly counted both tries to dead- 
lock the count. Ralph Billett stuck up 
a long shot and Tony Rozman took the 
ball off the bankboard to net a follow- 
up shot to place L. V. C. again in the 
van. Before another center jump could 
be completed, the final gun sounded, 
L. V. C. landing a victory by a 39-37 
score as the crowd cheered wildly. 
The summaries : 

Lebanon Valley 

G. F. T. 

P. Billett F 7 1 15 

Kress F o .0 

R. Billett F 204 

Frey C 6 2 14 

Rozman G 306 

Brown G 000 

Speg G 000 



L. V. C. Defeats Bears, 
Loses To Gettysburg 

Valleyites Split Even In 
Games Contested On For- 
eign Courts Before Exams 

Lebanon Valley's coursters split even 
in a pair of pre-exam games, defeating 
the Ursinus Bears, 39 to 31, and losing 
to Gettysburg, 46 to 35. Both games 
were contested on foreign courts. 

Against Ursinus Paul Billett and Tony 
Rozman ran wild to account for fifteen 
and fourteen points respectively as the 
Valleyites registered their first league 
win of the season. L. V. C. led through- 
out most of the contest and was never 
in danger of being defeated by the Bears, 
who are at present occupying the cellar 
in the loop standings. 

At Gettysburg, the Valleyites kept pace 
with the Bullets during the first half but 
seemed to lose their pep in the closing 
half as the students of Hen Bream 
stepped away to an easy win by virtue 
of a rally during the closing minutes of 
the last half. Tony Rozman led the L. 
V. C. attack with 16 points, with Paul 
Billett accounting for nine counters. 
Fish, Bommer, and O'Neill were the 
leading scorers for the Battlefield quin- 
tet. 



Totals 18 

Gettysburg 



39 



T. 



G. F. 

Fish F 237 

Bommer F 248 

O'Neill C 306 

Yevak G 000 

Weems G 5 3 13 

Lewis G 113 



Totals 13 



37 



I. R. C, MAKES PLANS 

FOR ACTIVE WEEK 

(Continued from page 1) 

recognized authority upon this subject. 

Miss Riegelman was a member of the 
International Relations Club at Smith 
College while an undergraduate student 
there. She has continued her interest in 
international affairs and has devoted her 
time especially to the study of the work 
of the h L. O. 




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PAGE FOUR 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 1937 



It Isn't Done . . 

The Column returns from its brief 
respite after exams feeling very re- 
freshed and ready to hurl the verbiage. 
Hence, you will in all probability be 
able to delect a certain stiff breeze sail- 
ing through our wordage today. Villiann 
chose the perfect place to recuperate 
from his (aha! the secret is out!) ex- 
ams — a sanatorium! 'Sa lad. 

• 

Dozens of co-eds and flocks of stu- 
dents have asked us . . . awright, a girl I 
. . . has asked us why we very rarely 
print any of the current faux pus ot 
one Hal (No Middle Name) Phillips. 
"Miss Mulligatawney' , we said to her, 
raising our lett eyebrow (and all Leba- 
non County is littered with the remains 
of those at whom we have raised out- 
left eyebrow), 'Miss M.," we said, "this 
Phillips fella is our own very special 
concern — and besides he's very modest— 
a veritable blushing violet — hates to see 
his name in print." That oughta hold 
all of 'em! 

Editor's Note — This modesty is sim- 
ply killing. 

• 

You've probably heard this, but it's 
still . . .: It seems that Prof. Richie 
had just spent an entire period review- 
ing for the semester exam in Bible 14. 
A trifle wearily he surveyed the assem- 
bled bright-and-shining faces and said, 
"Before we leave, are there any ques 
tions?" The b. and s. faces continued to 
b. and s., except for one Pure-Braii 
from Lebanon who pushed a paw inti 
the atmosphere and callowly gargled, 
"Yes, Dr. Richie, what I want to know 
is whether there will be any questions 
on the exam concerning the Bible." 
e 

We now take you form the sublime to 
Mr. Claude Chapin, the man who lives 
in the Nutcracker Suke, and who is very 
much with us this week. That Claude 
Man is the fellow who has been causing 
shakeups in the dining halls the past 
few weeks by bringing a Cocomalt mix 
ing-gadget to meals with him. He swings 
it around in the air over his head. And 
the waiter force is rendered nearly apo- 
plectic. 

A moonless ni^ht during the first 
week „f exams . . the campus enshroud- 
ed in darkness . . . and Mr. Hans 
Brighton (prominent local night-watch- 
n an and Pal of the Student Body) has 
just locked the Conserve Building and 
is headed away, when there suddenly 
break forth noises indicative of a small 
herd of water-buffalo in the organ- 
practice room. Business of unlocking 
and charging in . . . to find Mr. C. Cha- 
pin comfortably curled up on the floor. 
"What's the grand idea?" barks Hans. 
"Oh," yawns Chapin, "1 just wanted to 
know what it would feel like to be 
locked in a dark building in the middle 
of the night!" It actually happened, 
and there wasn't a trolley-car in sight. 

During a conference Monday evening, 
Claude (guess who) confided to Prof. 
C irmean that he had just finished iron- 
ing his shirts; and then proceeded to 
apologize for the horrible condition of 
the shirt he was wearing — one of those 
he had just ironed. Prof. Carmean gave 
the shirt the once-over; saw that the 
shirt looked perfectly okay — neatly 
pressed and clean. Then the Herr Cha- 
pin headed for the door, revealing, to 
Prof. C's definitely startled gaze, the 
fact that the entire shirt area between 
the shirt-tail and the collar was now 
nothingness. That Chapin Guv had 
rcorched the whole business and was at- 
tired in just a collar, pair of sleeves, 
and a shirt-front. 

• 

We have on our desk a very long, sad, 
brimimng-with-pathos, tale concerning 
Ted "Low Gear" Loos. Unfortunately 
space doesn't permit our giving you ail 
of the sordid details. So we'll simply 



I ( res*d 2nt Lynch' s Activities 

Jan. io — Addressed the Red Lion 

High School Assembly. 
Jan. ii — Addressed "Father and Son" 

banquet of the Otterbein U. B. 

Church in Baltimore. 
Feb. 2, 3 — Attended meetings of the 

Board of Christian Education at 

Dayton, Ohio. 
Feb. 4, 5 — Will attend meetings of 

the Board of Administration, Day- 
ton, Ohio. 
Feb. 7 — 9:00 — Address pupils of Her- 

shey Industrial School. 

10:30 — Preach at Hershey U. B. 

Church. 

3 :oo — Speak at Community Serv- 
ice held in the Hershey Community 
Building. 

7 :30 — Anniversary sermon at 
Manheim U. B. Church. 



Delphian Elects 

Shaeffer President 



In a recent Delphian meeting the of- 
ficers were elected to serve during the 
second semester. The following were 
chosen: President, Cordelia Shaeffer; 
Vice President, Elizabeth Bingaman; 
Corresponding Secretary, Agnes Mor- 
ris; Recording Secretary, Ruth Rohrer: 
Treasurer, Ernestine Jagnesak; Critic, 
Greta Heiland; Pianist, Esther Flom; 
Wardens, Barbara Bowman and Kath- 
ryn Zwally. 



state that one night during the 2nd 
week of exams, a crew of diabolical 
waiters bestirred Ted (a waiter him- 
jelf) from the hay at 2:30 of the A. M., 
celling him that it was time to go oser 
md set up tables. Ted took some con- 
vincing, but he finally got up, dressed 
md tramped across the campus toward 
North Hall with brother-waiter Reber, 
^serving, "Gcsh, but it's dark for 7:00 
' . M.!" Reber told him that it was 
unusually cloudy, returned to the dorm 
m some pretext, leaving "Low Gear" 
r der a lamp-post to await his return 
Theodore was still standing there at 
1:10, talking to the spaniel puppy which 
has recently adopted L. V. 

e 

. . . We learn via the grape -vine that 
Bill Clark really and sincerely didn't 
'enow until the week before the exams 
hat the Psych section of which he was 
1 member met three times a week and 
lot just twice. 

. . . Maxine "Burbank" Earley has fi- 
nally persuaded her ivy-plant that it 
ougta grow — thus out-burbanking Bur- 
iank at his Lutherest. 

. . . The fellows in Room 301 are now 
oalsy-walsy with Rosie <!v Aggie. A 
lightly dazed dove-of-pcace is now 
wittering about the place for all it is 
worth. 

. . . And Grace Naugle is agin Sur- 
realistic fur-lined teacups. "They are," 
ays Grace, "not practical." 

. . . Lois Harbold's new coiffure (hair 
'ress to youse and youse) is not just 
something she ran off on a seismograph. 
Tt is from Vogue by way of Virginia 
Xiessner. 

• 

Nobody, to date, has suggested a name 
for our favorite campus orchestra. So. 
in desperation, and as a possible source 
of inspiration to our readers (both of 
you), we timidly put forth "Oscar Off- 
beat & His Ostracized Syneopators." Or, 
perhaps, "0*Shaughnessy Marblehead 
and His Six Ears of Corn." We can 
hear Phil Lester's agonized, "We wuz 
robbed! And there ain't no justice!" 

• 

You can't hand an orchid to a felloWj 
so we'll simply dedicate this week's 
5tint to Mr. F. W. MacMullen, a good 
egg if there ever was one — and there 
was one! — Villiann. 



Wh atThey Say 



Question — Do y&u think that 
President lloosevelt should intervene 
in strikes mch us I lie General Mo- 
lars and Seaman's striked? 



JOHN KITZMILLER, Sophomore 
It's none of Roosevelt's business. Just 
because the voters voted for him doesn't 
say he has the right to intervene. 

ET1 ILL WILT, Junior— It all de- 
pends. If he interferes in the right man- 
ner, doing justice to both sides. 

* * * 

WILLIAM EARNEST, Senior — It 
would depend on the President's angle 
in intervening. If he attended to settle 
the tiouble, all right; but not if he 
would stir up more trouble. 

* * * 

JOHN MOYER, Sophomore — From 
the standpoint of returning a favor, no; 

but from other sides, yes. 

* * * 

AUDREY FOX, Sophomore — I don't 
see why not, since it's a national af- 
fair, not a state affair. 

* * * 

DOYLE SUMNER, Freshman— If 
the President takes sides he is setting 
a precedent for son.e other president. 
In fact, it is a fascist outlook. This 
president is a democratic official, not 
fascist. 

* * ♦ 

ROBERT LONG, Sophomore— Inas- 
much as the factories do not belong to 
the workers they should not use de- 
structive methods. State officials should 
stop it, but if they do not, the Presi- 
dent should, since somebody must. 

* * * 

HELEN NETHERWOOD, Juuior- 
1 don't. They should settle matters be- 
tween themselves. 

* * * 

HARRY DEAVEN, Junior — It's a 
matter of the interpretation of the Con- 
stitution. 1 interpret it broadly. He 
should interfere became it concerns the 
destinies of our nation. 



Messersmith Elected 
To Kalo Presidency 



The Kalos held their election of offi- 
cers for the secon'd se.ticster in Kalo 
Hall at 1 o'clock on Wednesday, Feb- 
ruary 3, 1937. After much self-inflicted 
mental torture, caused by indecision on 
the part of the voters, they finally hit 
on the following set-up: President, Ed- 
gar Messersmith; Vice President, John 
Gongloff; Secretary, Louis Conrad; Cor- 
responding Secretary, David Byerly; 
Sergeant at Arms, Clarence Aungst, 
Christian Walk and William Scherfel; 
Chaplain, Elwood Needy. 

It is rumored in official circles that 
the new administration will machinate 
in an effort to employ more ritual and 
ceremony in the Kalozetean meetings as 
well as to try to aid the treasurer in 
collecting dues. 



! No College Man Can Afford j 
j To Disregard hTs Appear- j 
j 3 nee. 

j "Make it a Rule to Visit Us | 
Once a Week" \ 



KARL'S SHOP 

Cornkr Main and White Oak Sts. I 



1938 QUITTAPAHILLA 

PROGRESS RAPIDLY 

'Continued from page 1) 

the representative of the Sarony Stu- 
dios, Ulrich has been faced with the 
task of securing all the group pictures 
and finishing the remainder of the pho- 
tographic work held over from last fall. 

There have been unusually few diffi- 
culties in the business department of the 
publication. The Business Manager, 
Boyd Shaffer, states that the expendi- 
tures of the department are already cov- 
ered completely, leaving not only a com- 
fortable margin of safety but also a re- 
spectable amount remaining in the class 
treasury. The amount of advertising con- 
tracted has already exceeded that in pre- 
vious years, and there is a growing 
amount of subscriptions accumulating. 
All this is coupled with the fact that 
"Quittie" expenditures are greater this 
year than in previous years. 

There is a difference of opinion among 
Shaffer and Dellinger as to when the 
book will be issued, but if no unfore- 
seen contingencies arise the probabilities 
are that it will be out next May. At any 
rate, its debut is eagerly awaited by the 
student body. 



A friend of ours who has been reading 
Schopenhauer has just dropped in to 
wonder why that chap in Thorton Wil- 
der' s Heaven's My Destination who dis- 
tributed cards with the edifying inscrip- 
tion, "Women wh;> smoke are unfit to be 
mothers," inserted the qualifying clause. 



DIEHL DRUG CO. 

103 W. Main St., ANNVILLE, PA. 

Cut Prices on 
Cosmetics 
Hospital Supplies 
Dental Preparations 
Shaving Necessities 
Fountain Service 
"Visit the Safe Place" 
Magazines 
We fill Prescriptions 



Compliments of 

A. & P. STORE 



C. H. SHEARER, Mgr. 



DI NUNZI0 
SHOE SHOP 

"Our Motto is to Please" 
A Trial Will Convince You 
9 E. Main St., ANNVILLE, PA. 



PEGGY'S BEAUTY 
SHOP 

Special on Frederick Permanent 
Waves 

$4.00 $6.00 

2 blocks West on Sheridan Avenue 



D. L. SAYL0R $ 
SONS 

Contractors 

Lumber and Coal 

ANNVILLE, PENNA. 



RENU SHOP 

One Day Service 
Dry Cleaning, Pressing, Rep a i tjlj 
11 E. Main St. ANNVILLE, p« 



Kl 



Furniture 
Floor Coverings 
Electric Refrigerators 
Hoover Electric Sweepers 
Electric Washing Machines 

RCA Radios 
FUNERAL DIRECTORS 
Phone 144 ANNVILLE, Pa 



John Hirsh Dept. Store 

Men's Leather and Wool Jackets 
Wool Mackinaws 
Weyenberg Shoes 
Phone 145 9-11 W. Main St. 

ANNVILLE, PA. 



For School Supplies and 
Books of ail Kinds Go To: 

BOLLMAN'S 

628 Cumberland Street 
LEBANON, PA. 



Meals Served Daily 

Best Sundaes in Town with 
Home Made Ice Cream 
Sandwiches, Cigarettes, Candy 

CD. BRUNNER 

E. Main St. ANNVILLE, PA. 



Complete Your Food 
Supply For That Midnight 
Lunch By Stopping At 

FINK'S BAKERY 



We sell all types of baked pf ( 
at all hours. 



■oducts 



CLOTHING OF QUALITY 

J. S. BASH ORE 

Lebanon , 





'Start the day 

In the Modern way. 

Breakfast at the Pennway 



THE PENNWAY HOTEL j 

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Welcome, Dads! 




Welcome, Dads! 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 




ANNVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 1937 



No. 20 



yjL Prepared For 
Tmrd LY. Dads Day 



bUsr WEEK-END 



^nquet, Music, basketball 
uam e » speakers, Movies, 
ijn rrogram r or Uads 

-U&d's Day,' x eoruary ±y, will give 
j ie iailicrs oi J_>euanun \aney College 
,en a" opportunity to see wnere their 
UilllK roils are rolling. Moi to be out- 
yuC uy tne wonie.i oi tne campus anu 
tueir Annual Mother's uay, tne Y. M. 
L i. lias niatle extensive preparations 
uf tne eiitertainmeiit 01 tne Host oi 
tuus whicli is expcCLeu to swoop Uown 
u pon the Alma Mater un baturuay. 
w uia strauu, presiuent oi the orgam- 
u um, nas even urged those who nave 
u uuus to borrow one tor tile occasion. 

ihe climax oi tne ieativities will be 
readied at live o'ciock, wiien the large 
inning room will be turned over to the 
rutlier and Sons' uanquet. .Although it 
might have been better to Kill the tatted 
can in honor of the pops — college boys 
ni ueait, tne roast ueei is not hKely to 
lie unappieciaied or allowed to go to 
waste, liesiues the banquet, a musical 
program in the Chapel and a basketball 
giime are on tne program. 

If pa arrives on Saturday morning, 
low or uick or Harry will have all oi 
tne morning hours in which to take him 
on an inspection tour of tne campus. In 
the afternoon, papa will be the guest 
of the Conservatory students in the au- 
ditorium of Engle Hall. A program to 
ne presented features Hubert Clippinger 
at the organ; Emily Kindt and her 
Marimba; and James Italston, pianist. 
An address of welcome will be delivered 
b y Ur. A. H. M. Stonecipher, dean oi 
|* V. C. Louis Straub will address the 
Ms on behalf of the local student Y. 
U C. A. 

To give father a glimpse of everyday 
fciupus life, Dr. Derickson's moving- 
l^tures of Lebanon Valley College will 
lj e shown. 

At five o'clock — customary zero hour 
llt the dining hall— father will feast like 
a kin g> his digestion of the delicacies 
ue ">g facilitated by the soothing strains 
* J ohn Zettlemoyer's violin. The hall 
*7 De elaborately decorated, and cigars 
*»U be given as favors by the Y. M. 

A. Dr. Butterwick will be toast- 
master. 

Speakers at the Father and Sons' ban- 
JJ *U be Rev. O. T. Ehrhart of Lan- 
as whose son is a student at Leba- 

lOtl Vail 

tit ;* u ey, and who is a Representa- 
, ti-om the Kast Pennsylvania Con- 



ence to the Board of Trustees; Dr. 
' e A. Lynch, president of the col- 
^*imed on Page 3, Column 2) 

Ci io Installs Officers 



hall 1 Sh ° rt busines s meeting in Clio 
bold ° n Monday afternoon, Lois Har- 
l, resia Was installed by the former 
^ter^" 1 ftS P resid ent of Clionian 
tiles' S(>cie ty for the second se- 
of og f' Afte r she had taken the oatli 
otl ler ^ MiSS Harbokl installed the 
lo\v S: officers - They are as fol- 
^cord/ 106 1)resident » Louise Stoner; 
t'o rre 8 secretary, Jean Harnish; 
Spf _ Ponding secretary, Lena Ris- 
of tl le e ?. S, ."'* Jr ' Helen Barlett; editor 
May gt kve Branch, Margie Gerry; 
v. C ' Amy Meinhardt 



Kalo Plans Dinner-Dance 
Play iVou) In Rehearsal 

Kalo's Anniversary President, George 
Smeltzer, heard favorable reports from 
all of the Anniversary Committees at 
Kalo's last meeting Feb. 6. The Society 
voted to have roast turkey feature the 
gustatory portion of the dance. The 
favors committee is arduously at work, 
as is the orchestra committee, which has 
yet to select the dance band. The Hotel 
has been reserved since last year's dance, 
and the date is Saturday, March 20. 

On Tuesday afternoon casting for "The 
Bishop Misbehaves" took place. The fol- 
lowing were chosen to present this choice 
bit of comedy which will be under the 
joint-direction of Dr. Struble and Rob- 
ert Spohn: — 

Bishop of Br oad minster ; Dean Aungst ; 
Red Eagan, Harlan Kinney ; Donald 
Meadozvs, Richard Smith ; Hester, Mil- 
dred Haas; Mrs. Waller, Barbara Bow- 
man ; Waller, Edgar Messersmith ; Lady 
Emily Lyons, Anna Morrison; Collins, 
Arthur Heisch ; Mr. Brooke, Charles 
Raab ; Frenchy, El wood Needy. 



H.M.S. Pinafore Cast 
Drops Production 

LACK OF CO-OPERATION 



Majority Decision Rules 
Abandonment Of Musical 
Project 

By a majority vote of the cast of 
"H. M. S. Pinafore," it was decided 
definitely to drop the production of this 
Gilbert and Sullivan operetta. 

This decision came as a blow to many 
Lebanon Valley people who have been 
awaiting eagerly this presentation. Not 
since 1934 has the conservatory spon- 
sored an operetta, when it presented Gil- 
bert and Sullivan's "Trial by Jury" in 
March of that year. 

Some of the members of the cast and 
the directors of "H. M. S. Pinafore" 
who worked faithfully for the last three 
months are not a little irked by the 
majority decision. 

Professor Crawford, who was in 
charge of the production, not only spent 
many evenings with the cast, but also 
(Confirmed on Page 2, Column 4) 



Rehearsals Begin On 
W. and B. Melodrama 



On Monday afternoon tryouts were 
held for the comedy presentation "Gold 
In The Hills" which will be one of the 
plays sponsored by the Wig and Buckle 
this semester. This play, a farce, will be 
ready for presentation on March 10, IQ37- 
Tuesday evening the play went into re- 
hearsal under the capable direction of 
Harold Phillips. It is the hope of Presi- 
dent Phillips and his committees that all 
club members will give this production 
their best support. The cast as it now 
stands is as follows: 

Nell, Sylva Harclerode; Lizzie, Mary 
Zartman; Barbara, Maxine Earley; Hir- 
am Stanely, William Earnest; Rich- 
ard Mwgatroyd, Karl Flocken; Slade, 
William Clark; Jenkins, Allen Ruther- 
ford. 



Dr. Clyde Lynch Speaks 
At Community Service 

CONSERVE LENDS MUSIC 



Lynch Scores Marxianism and 
Offers Solution To Econo- 
mic Woes At Hershey 

The regular Sunday afternoon Com- 
munity Service held in the Community 
Theatre at Hershey was conducted Fe- 
bruary 7 by representatives of L. V. C. 

Dr. Clyde A. Lynch was the guest 
speaker; Donald Woriey, tenor, pre- 
sented two vocal selections : The Lord's 
Prayer by Mallotte, and The Penitent 
by Van de Water ; Earl Unger played a 
cornet solo, O Come All Ye Faithful by 
Reading. These two artists were ac- 
companied by Sara Light. 

The topic of Dr. Lynch's talk was 
"The Cross and the Economic Crises." In 
presenting the church's battle with Com- 
munism he said, "the only way for the 
Church to fight Communism successfully 
is to give the people something better. 
Religion must be concerned in the whole 
man and the totality of his relationships." 
His opinion as to what our economic 
system in the future will be was ex- 
pressed thus : "a modified capitalistic 
system which will retain the profit mo- 
tive but one in wlwh that motive will 
not dominate." And further — "The pur- 
chasing power of the working-man is 
always behind creating under-consump- 
tion and unemployment. When industry 
does not share profit fairly with work- 
ers, unemployment ensues, and then in- 
dustry and the employed are taxed heavi- 
ly for their maintenance by taxation as 
well as by public and private charities." 
this new system "must be promoted by 
love and not by force." "Marx champions 

(Continued on Page 2, Column 5) 



Flood Reliet Dance 
Quite Lively Affair 

SPONSORED BY SENIORS 



Twenty-Nine Dollars Contri- 
buted By Dancers; Y. M., 
Y. W. Swell Donations 



The dance which the senior class 
sponsored last Friday evening for the 
benefit of the destitute people in the 
Hooded districts of the Ohio and lower 
Mississippi valleys was a pronounced 
success, both with reference to the alac- 
rity with which the college folk respond- 
ed to the affair in a social way, and to 
the actual sum contributed to the fund. 
The amount, which totalled nearly twen- 
ty-nine dollars, and which included con- 
tributions from the Y. M. and the Y. W. 
C. A., was presented to the Red Cross 
to aid in flood relief administration. 

The success of the undertaking may 
be attributed in a considerable measure 
to the energy of Mr. MacMullen, the 
newly-elected president of the senior 
class. He, in company with a corps of 
student technicians, invaded the physics 
lab and constructed an amplifying de- 
vice which, when connected to an ordi- 
nary phonograph, produced adequate 
(Continued on Page 4, Column 4) 



Deputations of L W. R. 
Conduct Four Services 

Although not actively engaged as a 
campus organization, the Life Work Re- 
cruits, under the leadership of Ellwood 
Needy, are faced with a heavy schedule 
of deputations for the coming weeks. 
With Education Day being featured in 
the United Brethren churches through- 
out the conferences, the services of the 
Recruits are increasingly in demand by 
the various churches. This past Sun- 
day the organization was represented by 
groups in four different churches. 

A group of recruits motored to Balti- 
more, Maryland, Feb. 7, to conduct serv- 
ices in the Otterbein Memorial U. B. 
Church, of which Rev. Paul R. Koontz, 
an alumnus of L. V. C, is pastor. The 
group was composed of Dorothy Zeiters, 
who featured her cello, Ruth Goyne, 
piano and accompanist, Rose Tschopp, 
voice, Ellwood Needy in charge of the 
service, and Daniel Shearer, who gave 
the evening sermon on the subject "Liv- 
ing Creatively." 

(Continued on Page 2, Column 1) 



Eastland Polls. Large 
Vote For President 

RECORD TURNOUT NOTE 



Prominent Senior Elected As 
Phtlokosmian Anniversary 
President 



A formal ballot cast in Philo Hall 
i'uesday afternoon substantiated what 
nail already been a foregone conclusion 
in regards to the anniversary presi- 
.ency. Kenneth Eastland, a popular se- 
nior long active in the affairs of the So- 
ciety, was elected to that post of honor 
ay an overwhelming vote of the mem- 
bers present. The society had appar- 
ently turned out en masse for the oc- 
casion, and the unusually large number 
of members present and the keen inter- 
est evinced gave ample assurance that 
the traditional Philokosmian spirit was 
still there. John Trego and William 
Earnest were also nominated for the 
same office. 

The election of Eastland, as well as 
the renewed vigor of the society, gives 
fine promise of a brilliant anniversary. 
The Philo-Clio play which looms ahead 
is certain to rise up to and probably 
above the high standards set by pre- 
vious productions of its type. The new 
President is assured of the utmost co- 
operation and efficiency of the dramatic 
elements in the college, and a wealth of 
talent is available. Moreover, judging 
from the turnout at recent meetings, 
the members are perpared to back the 
anniversary dance one hundred percent. 
These occasions do much toward making- 
May Day week-end the biggest week- 
end of the year. 

The society is also planting to insti- 
tute dancing instruction for the benefit 
of those members who desire it. These 
classes will probably be handled as in 
previous years, and it is expected that 
they will begin in the near future. Dean 
Stonecipher has been approached on the 
question and has indicated that he is 
quite favorable toward the project. The 
recreation hours will give the new pu- 
(( 'on Unwed on Page 2, Column 4) 



LVX. Varsity Five 
Defeats Mules; 4944 

FREY, P. BILLETT STAR 



Fiying Dutchmen Stave Off 
Late Muhlenberg Rally To 
Register Third Win 



Lebanon Valley's courtsters staved off 
a determined Muhlenberg rally in the 
late minutes of the third home game of 
the current cage season last Wednesday 
night and copped their third league vic- 
tory by a 49-44 count in a nip-and-tuck 
battle. Sophomore Raymie Frey and Cap- 
tain Paul Billett paced the Flying 
Dutchmen in the win, which enabled the 
Blue and White to again show a .500 
percentage in league competition. 

i wo foul conversions by Grossman, 
visiting captain, gave the Muhlenbergers 
the lead for the first time during the entire 
same, the figures favoring the foes, 42 to 
41, with but three minutes of play re- 
maining. Clair Snell followed up his 
own long shot for a field goal to again 
place L. V. C. in front, and the Val- 
leyites rallied to assume a commanding 
lead on a field goal by Ralph Billett and 
two foul conversions apiece for Paul 
Billett and Raymie Frey. McKee netted 
a pivot shot for the visitors' only points 
during the last three minutes and the 
Flying Dutchmen sported a five-point 
margin as the final gun sounded. 

Frey sank ten field pokes and two fouls 
to cop high scoring honors with 22 points 
tor the evening, while Captain Billett 
counted five nifty field chances and a 
quartet of fouls for 14 points. Ralph 
Billett netted a trio of twin-counters and 
Brown counted one, while Clair Snell 
tallied twice from the field, in addition 
to playing a nice game in the backcourt. 
John Speg fitted in well with the Me- 
toxen combination when he subbed for 
Bob Brown at a guard position. Gener- 
ally speaking, the Valleyites looked good 
in their win over the Mules, their shoot- 
ing and their work off both bankboards 
being particularly commendable. 
First Half 

Ralph Billett opened the scoring with 
a foul goal called on Grossman and 
Paul Billett counted an overhead poke 
on an out of bounds play to send L. V. 
C. away with a rush. McKee and Kohler 
knotted the count on foul tosses, but 
Raymie Frey counted a neat dribble-in 
chance and a long try to send the Blue 
and White ahead, 7-3. Martin made it 
five for Muhlenberg on a dribble-in shot, 
but Paul Billett netted a follow-up and 
(Continued on Page 3, Column 1) 



Wife of Former L V. 
President Passes Away 

Mrs. E. Benjamin Bierman, wife of a 
former President of Lebanon Valley Col- 
lege, died last Saturday morning in 
Hamburg where she had lived for some 
years with her niece. Mrs. Bierman, who 
was 95 years old last week, was buried 
in the Mt. Annville cemetery. 

Dr. Clyde A. Lynch represented Leb- 
anon Valley College at the funeral. Dr. 
Bierman was President of the college 
from 1890 to 1897. Later he was Treas- 
urer of the college until his death in 
1906. 



p 



PAGE TWO 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 1937 



KSTAIILLSHED 1925 



A weekly publication by the Undergraduate Students of Lebanon Valley College 



EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 
Richard A. Baus, '37 



MANAGING EDITOR 

Edgar Messersinith, '37 
ASSISTANT 

Boyd Shaffer, '38 



ASSOCIATE EDITORS 
William H. Earnest, '37 
Louis E. Straub, '37 



EDITORIAL BOARD 
SPORTS EDITOR FEATURE EDITOR 

William H. Earnest, '37 Louise Stoner, '38 

REPORTORIAL STAFF 

Mildred Gangwer, '39 Conservatory 

Duey Unger, '37 - Kalozetan 

Alice Richie, '39 _ Delphian 

Kenneth Eastland, '37 .. Philokosmiax 

Grace Naugle, '37 „.Clionian 

Harold Beamesdert'er, '37 Ernestine Jagnesak, '38 

Karl Flocken, '37 Wanda Price, '38 

Eleanor Lynch, '37 Calvin Spitler, '38 

Harold Phillips, '37 Theresa Stefan, '38 

Clifford Barnhart, '38 William Clark, '39 

Elizabeth Bender, '38 Thomas Guinivan, '39 

Sylva Harclerode, '38 Robert Long, '39 

Samuel Rutter, '39 

BUSINESS BOARD 
BUSINESS MANAGER CIRCULATION MANAGER 

Robert Kell, '37 Elwood Needy, '37 

ASSISTANT ASSISTANT 
Curvin Dellinger, '38 Ernest Weirick, '39 



Single Copies 5 cents 

Subscription $1.00 per year 



Entered at the Annville, Pa., post office as second class matter, under the Act of 
March 3, 1879. 

Published weekly through the school year, except during holiday vacation and 
examination week. 



REPKk*Elii>u fOR nKTIONAU ADVERTISING BY 

National Advertising Service, Inc. 

College Publishers Representative fc> 
420 Madison Ave. New York. N.Y. 
Chicaoo • Boston . can Francisco 

kOtANOILI* • PORTLAND • SlATTLB 



Editorial statements are not necessarily the consensus of opinion of the 
student body or administration. They are merely the opinions 
of the student editor unless otherwise indicated. 



Vol. XIII 



THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 1937 



No. 20 



WELCOME, DADS 



During the coming week-end the young men of the college are going to enter- 
tain their lathers, r-apa will con.e ami look the place over — outside and inside — 
rront and back, lie will have a chance to eat college food, sleep in a college Ded, 
hear college music, and percnance listen in on a genuine college bull session. 

The main object ox the airair is to show the head of the family just what son 
of a place it is where he has his otfopnng in interneship. The leaders in this enter- 
prise are doing ail they can to mane the visitors feel at home. It might be well, 
However, not to leave loo lavorabie an impression, as Dad might be tempted to 
return the following week-end with all his luggage and squat here permanently. 

When the Y. M. C. A. inaugurated this project on our campus two years ago 
it started something which is making a strong bid to become a tradition of Leba- 
non Valley College. \* e urge that henceforth the date of Dad's Day be reserved 
on the college calendar. 



BY THEIR WORKS YE SHALL KNOW THEM 



In view of various sit-down strikes throughout our fair land, one would be 
led to wonder if our men's senate hasn't caught the idea, too. There has been a 
very definite lessening of senate activity on our campus. A sober consideration of 
the case, however, discloses the fact that this lessening of activity by no means 
points out any ebbing of the senate's authority, nor does it indicate a depression 
in its morale. We may definitely conclude that the senate is witnessing an increas- 
ingly cooperative spirit on the part of the men students, thus eliminating the ne- 
cessity of extensive disciplinary action such as was invoked in the "good old days.'' 
i'he present situation is in precise accordance with the avowed policy of the sen- 
ate, which is that of helpfulness rather than of the exercise of authority for 
punitive purposes only. 

General Smedley Butler used to tell his marines that it was more glorious to 
succeed in a peaceful campaign than to obtain the same objective through blood- 
shed. Thus, if the men's senate here is obtaining results of a highly desirable na- 
ture by example, assistance, and precept, without the constant wholesale disciplin- 
ing of students, (and such, we affirm, is the case) it is deserving of high commen- 
dation. 



REPUTATIONS OF L. W. R, 
CONDUCTS FOUR SERVICES 



(Continued from page i) 



Another group took part in the even- 
ing service in the U. B. Church at 
Ephrata, including Louis Straub, speak- 
er, Minerva Hoffman, voice, Warren 
Brown, baritone, and Amy Meinhart, pi- 
ano and accompanist. 

Another deputation took charge of the 



evening service in the Palmyra U. B. 
Church of which Rev. P. B. Gibble is 
the pastor. Included in the group were 
Howard Peffley, speaker, Lucy Cook, 
voice, Phillip Lester, trombone, Esther 
Wise, piano and accompanist, and Au- 
drie Fox, in charge of the program. 

Doyle Sumner gave interesting ad- 
dresses in two Reading churches, the 
Salem U. B., with Rev. C. Beamesder- 
fer, pastor, and in the Trinity U. B. 
Church, with Rev. B. W. Sheetz, pastor. 



Debaters Prepare 
For Active Season 

SCHEDULE RELEASED 



Prof. Stokes, Dr. Black Coach 
Women's Teams; Dr. Stev- 
enson Men's Coach 



The women's debating association will 
open its season of activity next Wed- 
nesday afternoon at 4 :oq p. m., when the 
affirmative team, consisting of Hazel 
Heminway, Louise Saylor, and Jean 
Harnish, will debate the forensic ques- 
tion, "Resolved that Congress should be 
empowered to enact laws concerning 
minimum wages and maximum hours of 
industry," with a negative team from 
Bucknell University. The girls have 
been coached by Prof. Stokes, and are 
quite ready to uphold their side of the 
question. It will be a non-decision de- 
bate. 

The negative team, Theresa Stefan 
and Belle Mulhollen, is being coached by 
Dr. Black. 

This season's schedule is quite varied 
and promises some interesting discus- 
sions of a timely question for college 
audiences. 

Feb. 17 at Lebanon Valley 

L. V. aff. vs. Bucknell neg. 
*Feb. 23 at Western Maryland 

L. V. neg. vs. W. M. aff. 
Feb. 24 at Gettysburg 

L. V. neg. vs. Gettysburg aff. 
Feb. 23 at Bucknell 

L. V. aff. vs. Buckness neg. 
Mar. 4 at Ursinus 

L. V. aff. vs. Ursinus neg. 

At Lebanon Valley 

L. V. neg. vs. Ursinus aff. 
Mar. 11 at Kutztown 

L. V. neg. vs. Kutztown aff. 

At Lebanon Valley 

L. V. aff. vs. Kutztown neg. 
Mar. 17 at Elizabethtown 

L. V. aff. vs. Elizabethtown neg. 

At Lebanon Valley 

L. V. neg. vs. Elizabethtown aff. 
*April 1 at Penn State 

L. V. neg. vs. Penn State aff. 
*April 2 at Juniata 

L. V. neg. vs. Juniata aff. 



*Tcntative debates. 

The men's association also has a sched- 
ule including several debates with col- 
leges whom Lebanon Valley teams have 
never met. Clark, Thompson, and Spit- 
ler will comprise the affirmative team 
for the men, and Kinney, Shaffer, and 
Ehrhart will make up the negative team. 
Mar. 1 at Elizabethtown 

L. V. aff. vs. Elizabethtown neg. 
Mar. 8 at Lincoln U. 
L. V. neg. vs- Lincoln aff. 
At Lebanon Valley 
L. V. aff. vs. Lincoln neg. 
Mar. 10 at Ursinus 
L. V. aff. vs. Ursinus neg. 
At Lebanon Valley 
L. V. neg. vs. Ursinus aff- 
Mar. 11 at Wagner College (New York) 

L. V. neg. vs. Wagner aff. 
Mar. 16 at Chestertown, Md. 

L. V. aff. vs. Washington College neg. 
Mar. 18 at Lebanon Valley 
L. V. aff. vs. Wagner neg. 
Charles Kinney, the men's manager, 
has contacted several colleges for de- 
bates to be held March 12 and 15, away 
from home. These debates have not yet 
been arranged. 

At the end of the season, the two 
managers are arranging to have a de- 
bate between the men's and women's 
most victorious teams on our campus. 

Audience-decision debates will be in- 
augurated into the campus schedule sev- 
eral times during the season for the 
purpose of stimulating interest and dis- 
cussion among the college students. 



President Lynch's Activities 



FE 
FE 

FE 
F E 



B. 10 Addressed the lied Lion 

High School. 
B. 11 Addressed the Father and 

Son banquet of the Otterbein U. 

15. Church in Baltimore. 

B. 12 Will address the Fontana 

Parent Teachers' Association. 

M W ill deliver the anniver- 
sary sermons both morning and 
evening at the Sixth Street U. 
B. Church, Harrisburg. 



FACULTY NOTES 



Mrs. Green spent the last four days 
of January in Baltimore where she vis- 
ited her daughter Yvonne. 

* * * 

Dr. II. II. vShenk has a number of 
speaking engagements for the near fu- 
ture. Wednesday, February 10, he 
spoke on "Lincoln" at the Hamburg 
High School. Tonight he will speak to 
the Harrisburg Kiwanis Club on "Penn- 
sylvania and Lincoln." Sunday evening 
he will speak at the Hopeland U. B. 
Church on "Washington," and Sunday, 
February 21, he will address the Her- 
shey Industrial School in the morning 
and the Hershey Community Service at 
the theater in the afternoon on "Wash- 
ington as President." 

* * * 

Last week Miss Nella Miller played 
for the Wednesday Club of Harrisburg. 



H. M. S, PINAFORE CAST 

DROPS PRODUCTION 



(Continued from page 1) 



invested considerable time in making the 
necessary changes in the score to suit 
the needs of the people with whom he 
worked. Dr. Wallace had charge of the 
action, while Miss Henderson had been 
given the responsibility for the arrange- 
ment of the dances. 

Although certain members of the cast 
were willing to make the sacrifice nec- 
essary for the production, a majority 
hesitated to do so — as a consequence 
"H. M. S. Pinafore" will not be pro- 
duced as previous announcements indi- 
cated. 



EASTLAND POLLS LARGE 

VOTE FOR PRESIDENT 



(Continued from page 1) 



pils excellent opportunity to put their 
instruction to profitable use. 

The actual plans for the anniversary 
have not yet begun to take shape, but 
as Eastland will take office at the next 
meeting, it is certain that he will outline 
his views in the general course of his 
acceptance address. Committees will 
then be appointed and the actual anni- 
versary business will soon get under 
way. 



Student Teachers 

Begin Work 



Eighteen members of the senior 

class will observe and conduct class 
es in thte Annville Senior High School 
as practice teachers during this se- 
mester. They are as follows: 

French — Romaine Stiles, Ruth 
Buck; English — Flora Strayer, Thel- 
ma Denlinger, Claire Adams, Belle 
Mulhollen; Latin— Mary Webb; Bi- 
ology — John Trego, Donald Shay; 
History- Marjorie Smith, Theodore 
Loose, Gerald Bittinger; Civics 
Eleanor Lynch, Harold Beamesder- 
t'er; Problems of Democracy 
Charles Kinney; German- — Edgar 
Messersinith; Mai hematics ■ — .John 
Spcg; General Science — Paul Billett. 



What They S ay 

Question- Are you in favor j 
/'resident's Judicial lie form 
it concerns the Supreme Courts 



DONALD LUDWKJ, Sopl 



'The Supreme Court stopped „ 
bit of the ^resident's legislate,,, 
now he's cracking back, it's a, m* 



10 make a rubber stamp out 
court." 



of the 



THELMA DENLINGEK, Seni*^ 
think it's sihy. i think there are * 

tfl the Supreme Court now.'' fi 

* * * 

MILDRED GANGWER, Soph^ 
— "I think the President has •. ' 
idea. It is generally known that 1 
men are apt to live in the past. Y 
er men should be appointed who t e 
up with the trend of the times." ' 

* # * 

T11OMAS FOX, Frevhmui^ 
(Roosevelt) is on dangerous ground 1 
he had done this 10 years ago, th e , 
would have been a Revolution. Toomatw 
people think that whatever lioosevelt 
noes is all right." 

* * * 

CALVIN SPITLER, Junior-^ 
Supreme Court has been stuffed before 
I am in favor of a judiciary reform in 
some way. 1 don't know just how it 
should be done." 



HENRY GROFF, Junior— "The cri- 
sis is past, 'therefore, the President's 
move is unjustified. It is the action of a 
sorehead." 

• # * 

DOROTHY WENTLING, Sophomore 
— "i am in favor of the President's pro- 
posal, because the court is reaction- 
ary." 

• * * 

CURVIN THOMPSON, Senior-*l 
think it's a beautiful movement toward 
a dictatorship." 

• * • 

ELIZABETH BENDER, Junior- 
"It's just another form of inflation." 



DR. CLYDE LYNCH SPEAKS 

AT COMMUNITY SERVICE 



(Continued from page 1) 



a forced social order and tries to change 
the individual by making him fit into 
the social system. Jesus begins with 
the individual. He changes his heart, a 
slower but surer process." 

This address was but one of four de- 
livered by Pres. Lynch on Sunday. I" 
the morning he addressed the boys 
the Industrial School at Hershey, a* 
in the theatre; following that he ap- 
peared in the United Brethren Chu« 

* the 

at Hershey, and in the evening n> 1 
United Brethren Church at ManheW- 



ALUMNI NOTES 



ein- 
the 



C. Wilbur Shank, '36, has been 

ployed for the last six weeks by ^ 

Sheffield farms Company of New 

• .■ nrescnj? 
His job consists in preparing 1" 

lion milk and testing milk products- 



an" 
fly- 



Hilda Hess, '30, of Waynesboro. 

. ■ -pi-en 11 } " 
Paul Bartholow were married re 

* * * d » 

Mildred Nye, '34, recently seCUr * h£l)1 

position in the office of the l* e 
Steel Corporation in Lebanon. 

Elvin Fake, '35, has been elec « 
•her °t 

the position of Assistant Tea en ^ 
Cial Studies in the Harding J" 1 " 
School of Lebanon. 

* * * 

Raymond Keim, '26, who is * 
ing Principal of the Swatara 
Schools, visited the college 0" rf jJH 
He is arranging for a meeting ^ 
Harrisburg Alumni later i n 1 



if 

ifl 1 

triu' 
the 

;.,V0 

ten" 

rank 
leadi 
W 
.Met' 
at N 
even 
geth- 
leyit 
delpl 
jjutc 
cour 
table 
coun 

56SS1 

stanc 
At 
at L 
deiei 
cball 
meet 
the 1 
split 
tor t 

C. ai 
the c 
throi 
schec 

In 
Capt 
will 
causs 
ly ri 
the 

Th 



Fraa 
Getty 
Lebai 
Drex 
Muhl 
Albri 
Ursir 

L.V 



a sir 
on tl 
away 
Passi 
with 
court 
r a 
neat 
advai 
Billet 
Billet 
iicK 
V; 
Wij] 

feci, 

h . 

iom 

Blu e 

t'oui 

field 

L-V 

lo 9at< 

c °unt 



io Ur t 
Hi 



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4 



p 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY II, 1937 



l > aim 



lt Old 

keep 



-"He 
ad. if 
there 
many 
'sevelt 



-'•The 
•efore. 
rm iii 
ow it 



e cri- 
dent's 
i of a 



s pro- 
ctioa- 

>r— "1 
award 



/ICE 



hange 
t into 
with 
art. a 



ir de- 
iy. I" 
ys 0* 
p also 
e ap- 
hurch 
n the 
lheim. 



i em- 

r the 

scrip- 
ts. 

, an" 
■ently- 

red « 
ell* 111 



So- 
il!? 1 ' 

rid")'' 
f P 



0oxenmen Face Tests 
\ n Two Games This Week 

, Emerson "Chief" Metoxen's 
^oacf " ... 

quintet advanced into third place 

vJfS ^ Pastern Pennsylvania Collegiate 
. the & ° 

„ standings by virtue ol" their third 
h oi tl if season at the expense of 
Muhlenberg Mules last week, but 

^ iml' <jrtant tests tllis wee ^ wu ^ ^e- 
1 •„„ whether or not the Blue and 
, e rn lin 

1 ■ outfit will be able to hold their 
n'hite outni 

• a and perhaps threaten the league- 

k & M. and Gettysburg quintets, 
lead'-^ ' 

afith a squad cut to seven men, the 

,pn oupils faced Albright last night 

' Keading, and on Saturday night an 

3t mnre important test will bring to- 
cV eii niu 4v - 

Urexel's Dragons and the Val- 
jjethe r w ni -i 

. on the home court. The Phila- 
Icy ^ 

de lphians rallied to defeat the Flying 
Dutchmen two weeks ago on the Drexel 
•ourt and if the Valley ites can turn the 
tables on their foes in the coming en- 
unter, they wiU rate undisputed pos- 
sesion of the third spot in the league 
standings. 

Another vital league game was played 
at Lancaster last night, with F. & M.'s 
defending champions and their foremost 
challengers, the Gettysburg Bullets, 
meeting in a game which either placed 
the Diplomats definitely out in front or 
split the league lead wide open. A win 
ior the Gettysburgers would give L. V. 
C. an outside chance of rallying to take 
the crown if the Metoxenmen can travel 
through the remainder of their tough 
schedule undefeated. 

In the coming Drexel-L. V. C. fracas, 
Captain Matt Donaldson of the visitors 
will be the chief threat to the Valleyite 
cause, as the Dragon verteran was large- 
ly responsible for his team's defeat of 
the Flying Dutchmen two weeks ago. 

The league standings as of Wednes- 
day noon : 

W. L. Pet. 
Franklin and Marshall ..6 o 1.000 

Gettysburg 4 1 .800 

Lebanon Valley College 3 3 -500 

Drexel 3 4 .429 

Muhlenberg 3 4 -429 

Albright 1 3 .250 

Ursinus 5 .000 



PAGE THREE 



L V. C, VARSITY FIVE 

DEFEATS MULES; 49-14 



[Continued from page 1) 



a single foul chance called on Kohler 
°n the play. Grossman and Laing got 
a *ay for sleeper shots on neat Mule 
Passin & Plays, Paul Billett answering 
™ bother twin-counter from side- 
. rt - Fr ey tallied two more field goals 
ra Pid succession and Brown caged a 
"! at 011 e-handed stab to give L. V. C. the 
^vantage at 18 to 9. McKee and Ralph 
jj* traded double-deckers, and Paul 
Ik* registeretl a single point when 
^ ee was called for delaying action. 
iine aCy subb ed for Martin in the Mule 
pj^ at th is point, with Ed Kress re- 

ley.'i? Ra ' Ph BiHett for Lehanon Val " 
i 0ul rovvu committed his third personal 

Bl Ue and S P e g took his place for the 

S3 c h Ud White - Grossman netted the 

Hi ° ance ' but F rey counted his fifth 

L. 011 a neat tap-in chance, as 

liteiil ' ass umed a 23-12 lead. Tracy 



for three twin- 



ed th , 

c °tinter basket iui mice iwm- 

ir °tn I? f ° r the M ules, Kohler counted 
added ' lderneath the basket, and Laing 

H but aS the Muhlenber S ers ral_ 
^Urth fi PaUl ^ illeU registered his 
en , e ! d gual on a long shot as the 

1(led - 25 to 21. 

A. nift Second Half 
\\ fijy 11 of passing from Ralph to 
& ^keT t0 Raymie Fre y underneath 



c °Unti 



resulted in the L. V. C. cen- 



m S two points as the second 



half got under way. Tracy again located 
the nets from the floor for the Mules 
and Laing and McKee registered follow- 
up shots as the Muhlenbergers dead- 
locked the count at 27. Paul Billett 
came through with a long shot that 
split the cords and Raymie Frey counted 
on a tap-in for L. V. C. McKee counted 
two points on a pivot poke, Snell re- 
taliating with a sleeper shot on a pass 
from Frey. Kohler and Tracy tied the 
score at 33-all on field goals as the 
timekeepers indicated eleven minutes to 
go. Martin subbed for Kohler and Brown 
returned to the game at this point, Speg 
retiring. Frey dribbled the length of the 
court to register a double-decker. McKee 
counted one out of two free chances 
called on the L. V. C. center, who re- 
taliated by sinking a one-handed try 
from sidecourt. Martin and Frey swapped 
held chances as L. V. C. maintained a 
39-36 lead with six minutes of play re- 
maining. Martin counted a field goal but 
missed a foul chance called on Bob 
.Brown on the play. The L. V. C. guard 
was forced to retire via the four-foul 
route at this point and Speg returned to 
action. Ralph Billett registered an over- 
head poke, but Grossman registered a 
field goal and two foul chances to place 
his team in the lead at 42-41 with three 
minutes to go. Clair Snell followed up 
his own long shot to again give Lebanon 
Valley the advantage. Ralph Billett 
counted another overhead pivot chance 
and Raymie Frey calmly converted a 
pair of foul chances charged against 
McKee. McKee retaliated with a field 
goal on a pivot shot, but Paul Billett 
registered a brace of free tosses as the 
game ended with L. V. C. out in front 
at 49-44. 

The summaries: 

Lebanon Valley 
G. 

P. Billett F 5 

R. Billett F 3 

Kress F o 

Frey C 10 

Snell G 2 

Brown G 1 

Speg G o 



Totals 21 

Muhlenberg 
G. 

Martin F-G 3 

Grossman F 2 

Tracy F 5 

McKee C 4 

Laing G 2 

Kohler G 2 

Totals 18 



49 

T. 
6 

7 
10 
10 

5 

6 

44 



Y. M. PREPARED FOR 

THIRD L. V. DAD'S DAY 



(Continued from page 1) 



lege; and Duey Unger, who will repre- 
sent the students. Dr. G. A. Richie will 
also speak, presenting some interesting 
statistics on basketball. 

The banquet concluded, father will be 
invited to attend the basketball game 
between Drexel and L. V. C. as a ter- 
mination of the Y. M. C. A.'s third 
"Dad's Day" festivities. He will be 
provided with lodging until Sunday, if 
he wishes to spend the night on the 
campus. 

"Dad's Day" will represent a great 
deal Of efficient cooperation and labor 
on the part of the Y. M. C. A. commit- 
tees in charge. Appointed by Louis 
Strauto, popular president of the organ- 
ization, the "Major-General Command- 
ant" of the committees is Harold Bea- 
mesderfer. Committee chairmen are 
Theodore Loose, program; J. Kenneth 
Eastland, banquet 1 and Ernest Weirick, 
publicity. 



It is a peculiar circumstance that peo- 
ple who flatter us are always intelligent 
judges and discerning critics, while those 
who pay homage to our enemies are 
forthright prevaricators and pretentious 
hypocrites. 



Frosh Land Initial Win 
In Lyhens Scrap; 35-27 

Lebanon Valley's Frosh landed their 
first decision of the current court season 
last Friday when they defeated the Ly- 
kens High School quintet by a 35-27 
score a) Wiconisco. Assuming a lead 
of seven points at 24-17 at half-time the 
L. V. C. Greenies maintained the pace 
throughout the contest to land a win 
after successive setbacks in three pre- 
vious engagements. Geesey, Artz, and 
Whitman led the attack for the victori- 
ous Valleyites, while Smith was top 
scorer for the Lykens crew. The sum- 
maries : 

L. V. C. Frosh 

G. F. 

Whitman F 2 

Artz F 4 

Seiverling F 

Belmer C 2 

Geesey C 5 

Schaeffer G 1 

Kreiser G 1 

Grimm G o 



Totals 15 

Lykens H. S. 
G. 

Smith F 3 

Reedinger F 1 

Simmons C 3 

Rasbach G 2 

Copenhaver G 

Totals 9 



F. 
6 

2 
o 
1 



35 

T. 
12 

2 
8 

'4 
I 

27 



On the other hand, there is the asser- 
tion of LaRochefoucauld that two-thirds 
of the people would never fall in love 
if they couldn't read. This no doubL 
accounts for the popularity of the li- 
brary with the moie eligible Frosh. 



Women's Basketball Starts 



On Monday, February 15, at 4 P. 
M., there will he a practice game in 
the Annville High School gym be- 
tween the Annville girls' team and 
the Lebanon Valley basketeers. On 
Friday, February 19, at 3:30 1'. M., 
the Lebanon Valley girls are play- 
ing the Albright girls' team in the 
first game of .this sort played be- 
tween the two schools. The game will 
also be held in the high school gym. 
The girls would certainly appreciate 
it if the student body would back 
their teams as well as boys' teams. 
Attendance, is also urged at the dor- 
mitory and day student games as 
scheduled on the bulletin board.. 



Other Colleges 

The Day Student Council of Fenn 
College, located at Cleveland, Ohio, has 
a perplexing problem on its hands which 
it is trying to solve. Who should pay 
for injury expenses of student athletes? 
Several weeks ago one of Fenn College's 
basketball players was injured in a 
practice session. The player is trying to 
find out who is responsible for paying 

for the medical treatment he received. 

* * * 

"The gin and jazz age is vanishing," 
Kathleen Norris, American authoress, 
stated at the University of Washington 
recently. The depression, in her opinion, 
has had a steadying effect upon college 
people. "They realize that the task of 
helping to rebuild the country is on 
their shoulders and have discarded booze 
for books." 

# * * 

One of the fraternities at Lehigh Uni- 
versity lias begun a new hobby. The 
members collect items left behind by 
houseparty dates, and have them properly 
mounted and exhibited at various vant- 



Eclectic Club To Hold 
Formal Dance Saturday 

On Saturday, February 13, the Eclectic 
Club, the most exclusive organization 
on the College Campus, will hold its an- 
nual form d dance at the General Sutter 
Hotel at Lititz. The members have 
made extensive plans for the occasion 
and anticipate a brilliant affair. The 
music will be furnished by a well 
known local orchestra. 



age points about the houses. One dis- 
play consists of one pair of slippers, one 
slip, 24 hairpins, three lipsticks, and a 
plumber's bill. 

* * * 

Extension of Northwestern Universi- 
ty's Evanston campus a half mile into 
Lake Michigan is being planned by that 
institution's authorities. 

* # * 

Coeds on the Soward campus, Bir- 
mingham, have recently been trying to 
decide which ones of their men students 
they would rather be marooned with on 
a desert isle. Acording to the Howard 
Crimson their preference seems to be 

the man who can rustle the grub and 

cook it ! 

* * # 

William and Mary College has 
dropped student self-government with 
the resignation of the Men's Student 
Senate because of lack of student prob- 
lems. 

* * * 

Yale University has the addresses of 
all but 80 of its 31,003 graduates. 

* * * 

Girls who attended Wheaton College 
100 years ago were required to report 
in chapel on their mending and darning. 

* * * 

That at one time a Cedar Crest girl 
desirous of going shopping had to be 
in a party of five with a chaperon 




INTERESTING PIPE, j IT HAS 
JUDGE. LOOKS ^RECKON IT'S 



AS THOUGM 
IT'S BEEN 
SMOKED A 
LOT TOO 




25 YEARS SINCE 
CARVED IT 
OUT 



NAZISM I COULD 
GET MY PIPE 
TO CAKE AS 
NICE AS 
TH 



THAT'S EASY YOU 
JUST CAN'T HELP 
GETTING A GOOD 

CAKE USING 
PRINCE ALBERT j 




LOOK: HOW SNUG PA. PACKS IN BOWL. 
PRINCE ALBERT SURE MADE SMOKING 
"7 A LOT EASIER AND A HEAP COOLER 
NK/ITH THAT SCIENTIFIC "CRIMP CUT' 




IT CERTAINLY IS | 
A GREAT SMOKE, 
JUDGE .' (PUFF) TASTES 
(PUFF) MILD(PUFF). IT X S 
GOT EVERYTHING J 




YES, AND PA. HAS YET 
TO BITE MY 
TONGUE 



YOULL FINP THESE CHOICE, MELLOW PRINCE 
ALBERT TOBACCOS SMOKE MILP ANT? TASTX EA 
HAS THE BITE'KEMOVeD BY A SCIENTIFIC PROCESS- 
ITS CRIMP CUT' FOR COOLNESS, ANP KEEPS FRESH' 
IN THE HANUy TIN. ITS THE NATIONAL JOY SMOKE ! 



Copr.. 1987. R. J. Reynolds Tob. Co. 



50 



pipefuls of fra- 
grant tobacco in 
every 2-ounce tin 
of Prince Albert 



PRINCE ALBERT MONEY-BACK GUARANTEE 

Smoke 20 fragrant pipefuls of Prince Albert. If you don't find it the mellow- 
est, tastiest pipe tobacco you aver smoked, return the pocket tin with the 
rest of the tobacco in it to us at any time within a month from this date, and 
we will refund full purchase price, plus postage. 

(Signed) R. J. REYNOLDS TOBACCO COMPANY 
Winston-Salem, North Carolina 



a ( oigneaj K. 

Prince A 



LBERT 



THE fJATSONAL 
JOY SMOKE 



i 

I 



p 



PAGE FOUR 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 1937 



I. R. C. Addressed by 
Mrs. Kaiser Harnisch 



GERMAN JOURNALIST 



Gives Short Lecture Then Re- 
plies Many Queries I n 
Round Table Talk 



Before a large group in Philo Hall 
last Tuesday, February 9, Mrs. Mar- 
garete Kaiser Harnisch of Berlin, Ger- 
many, spoke to the assembled I. R. C. 
and German Club members on Ger- 
many. She is a brilliant German journal- 
ist, lecturer, and economist who came to 
the United States last December. Since 
that time she has travelled and lectured 
extensively in several eastern states, ap- 
pearing before civic clubs, students in 
American colleges, and on Monday she 
broadcasted over one of the large sta- 
tions in New York. From Lebanon Val- 
ley College she will travel westward 
and speak, among other places, at the 
University of Illinois. She has already 
spoken at Otterbein College on a pre- 
vious trip. , 

Mrs. Kaiser Harnisch discussed all 
questions raised in a detailed, informal 
manner. She satisfactorily outlined the 
economic, religious, and social aspects 
of Germany, with special reference to 
the National Socialist movement. She 
stated that this was chieliy a movement 
of the middle-class, of which numerous 
analogous situations can be found in 
other countries during their develop- 
ment. She stated that Hitler came to 
power entirely by the regular voting 
methods and that he has retained the 
support and confidence of the people- 
Many features of the Hitler regime ex- 
isted during the period immediately fol- 
lowing the World War. 

She stated that dictators do not spring 
up over night and that the support of 
the people is absolutely essential to their 
success. Adolph Hitler was the leader 
of a new rising spirit among the Ger- 
mans following the war, and is greatly 
admired by the people much as any other 
great statesmen were admired, lie has 
succeeded in centralizing the German 
states far more than they have been 
united before. She stated that there had 
been a rivalry between Bavaria and 
Prussia for many years, and that a 
Hessian ambassador was sent to Berlin 
rather than a legislative representative. 
She also stated that Bavarian soldiers 
disliked to be under the command of 
Prussian generals and vice versa. Such 
internal discrepancies have been entirely 
eradicated by the centralizing forces of 
National Socialism. 

Another point mentioned was the fact 
that as far as is logically possible, Hit- 
ler is not necessarily trying to make 
Germany self-sufficient. She also stated 
that Germany would be willing to buy 
if she could sell. However, due to the 
World War, many of Germany's old 
markets have been taken over by other 
countries and she has not been able to 
regain them. 

It was also pointed out that the Hit- 
ler movement is not a religious reform 
movement. It is not trying to over- 
throw Christianity, although some 
changes in conceptions are made- She 
stated that in many speeches Hitler re- 
fers to "Der dort oben", for "der Fuehr- 
er" is admired, not deified in anyway. 
The fact was also mentioned the that 
the Church is supporting Hitler. 

Tonight a special meeting of the L 
R. C. will be held at the home of Dr. 
Stevenson when Miss Carol Riegelman 
of the International Labor Office at Ge- 
neva will be the guest speaker. 



There are certain things which aren't 
being done by nice people. This, of 
course, is why nice people take so much 
interest in them. 



It Isn't Done sk 



We commence this week, dear cohSt&j A1 * wir vor einigen Monaten diese 



tuents, by divulging the horrible taJ peutsche Ecke anfingen sagten wir das 

man Raetsel, Witze usw. schreiben soll- 
te, soweit aber haben wir lauter philoso- 



lnvolving one Maury, one felts domes- 
tica, unu one Claude. He's our pal now; 
vve call him Claude, "i'would appear that 
at 3:00 A. M. during the very wee sma', 
one night last week, Claude was wak- 
ened by confused noises emanating from 
the neighboring bed of Joe Maury. The 
Maury was giving vent to strong invec- 
tive; in fact, the paint was practically 
peeling on the wails. And beiore Clauue 
could reach the door, a very angry cai 
came hying out iroiu under tlie covers. 
Said cat had crawled up tlie lire-escape, 
spotted the sluinberer, and decided to 
curl up with hull. Sociable cat, aston- 
ished Maury, confused Claude, bad tale, 
what? 

o 

Must give you the pay-off on the 
"Claude's backless shirt' item which wc 
ran last week and men we swear oil, 
so help us! Claude can pour T. N. T. 
into his cigarette-lighter ^which looka 
highly probable at present) and we 
shall print not a syllaoie of it. liearlten: 
Said Claude, ' Vhliann, you're a lousy 
reporter — l didn't scorch out the bucK 
ot my shirt; 1 just cat it out to use as 
a cloth to press my pants with.'' The 
italics are ours. \\ e shut him ! 

• 

Don't look now, but Philo elected 
their anniversary president Tuesuay. 
the meeting is covered eisewhere in tui^ 
issue; so ad we'll say is that they elect- 
ed a good telia, one ox the uesc, tne pee- 
pul s cnerce — Ken Eastland, (it we keep 
diis up, we'll be believing all this our- 
selves in another moment.) However, it 
aid warm the cockles 01 this concrete 
neart when we observed the rhilo home 
marching en masse into their Thira- 
rToor 'telephone Bouth with righteous 
gleams in their eyes, lustily caroling 
"Easterland for President!" 3-1—14 — 5. 
• 

. . . Helen Butterwick saw Robert 
xayior in Baltimore the other day: Un- 
reason for the asthmatic sigha whicn 
have been soaring across the campus u. 
late. You'll lind the Spirits or Ammonia 
out tie, Helen, on the second shell . 

. -. . Cheers to the people who puL 
across the Senior-Ciass-lted-cross-lMgnt- 
ball-Prom. They grossed over sixteen 
dodars (coliecteu in nickels, dimes, etc.) 
ior the benefit of the Eloou lieliei Tuna. 
This is, incidentally, probably tne ursi 
Lime in years that a uance held on this 
campus has shown a proiit. In the name 
of sweet charity, though, it's uinerent. 

. . . We relish particularly the way 
a certain Prof, phrased his description 
of a broadcast in class. He called it a 
"coast-to-coast hitchup." No, pardner, 
we ain't a-sayin' who. 

. . . Grace Naugle, who is reaiiy re- 
sponsible for most of the latest hair- 
dresses which have been sprouting on 
the campus like veritable mulberry 
bushes, has now blossomed forth with a 
flock of curls and sundry other foliage. 
In spite of what they say, Grace, we 
like it. Aside: Is it a fact that it takes 
three gals to comb it and get the thing- 
umabobs in place? 

• 

At the dining-table last night, the 
conversation turned to train-announcers. 
(Quiet, please! Do we ask questions?) 
And someone had just given a demon- 
stration by citing Lupton's entire name, 
viz.: Burrit Keeler Lawlin Tobias Lup- 
tion. Whereupon there piped up Lois 
Harbold who did inquire: "Well, do you 
think a guy with a single-track mind 
could announce trains?" 

• 

Is there no respite? Will there never 
be rest for the poor harassed day-stu- 
dent? Tuesday noon, some ffoul-ffiend 
went and heaved a string of firecrack- 
ers (loud ones, violent ones) into one 
of the lockers in the Men's Day-Student 
Room, lighted the fuse, and sauntered 
out. Several seconds later the place was 
in an uproar witli everyone running 



phifflhen Phantasien hervorgebracht. 
Diesen muss ein Ende gemacht werden 
wenn wir unscr Leben fortfuehren wollcn 
denn as wurde naemlich am Dienstag 
Mittag in dem Tagstudentenzimmer 
grausam geschossen, und, obgleich wir 
bei diesem Ausbruch gar keine Furcht 
zeigten, fiel uns der Gedanke ein dass es 
nun, da das Schiessen angefangen sei, 
doch gefaehrlich werden koennte. 

Diesmal, also, koennen die lieben Leser 
kleine Narreteien lesen nach beliebe. 
Erstens ein Paar "Zungenzuechtiger d- 
h. Sprueche deren wiederholtes Hersagen 
zu Zungenfertigkeit fuehrt : 

"Der Potsdamer Postkutscher putzt 
den Potsdamerpostkutschkasten." 

"Fischer Fritze fischt frische Fische, 
frische Fische fischt Fischer Fritze." 

Das alte Weihnachtslied '"Es ist ein 
Ros' entsprungen" singen die kleinen 
Berliner in folgender scherzhaften Nach- 
bildung : 

"Es ist ein Ross gesprungen aus ein- 
em Statchcldraht und hat sichs Bein 
verbrochen und fiel ins tiefe Grab." 

Schluss. 



The New Books 

Tlie Genetics of (Jar den fiants give^ 
an introduction to the essential princi- 
ples of genetics and cytology, and also 
provides an account 01 reve.it results in 
tins he.d 111 rectum to horticulture. The 
piau or the worK is to de.^cnoe princi- 
ples as simply as the technicalities oi 
uie suojeet win ahow, iilusi.rai.ing them 
wiiii typical examples trom a range 01 
dowers, fruits and vegetables, and to 
give references to the original sources 
or information which may be of interes'. 
to tne specialist or Student In the fore- 
word, Sir Darnel nail says oi the au- 
thors: "Ihey are luted, as few other men 
are, to be guiues to the practical plant- 
oreeuer in this important neld. They 
learned their science trom our greai 
English pioneer in genetics, \\ illiam 
bateson; they have worKen ior years 
under the favorab.e conditions atforded 
by the John Innes Horticultural Insti- 
tution. They speak with authority, and 
1 count myseli favored in that i have 
in some degree been associated with their 
work.'' 

The American Theatre reveals the de- 
velopment of our nati.e theatre through 
the eyes of famous writers and critic* 
who have sat in tlie playhouses from the 
pre-revolutionary theatre to Broadway. 
Washington Irving describes an evening 
at The Battle of H exam; Alexander 
VVoolcott rushes from the theatre to re- 
late an exciting first night of What Price 
Glory; and in between come accounts of 
the first nights of Uncle Tom's Cabin, 
East Lywne, and scores of other famous 
plays, and of the acting of Edwin Booth. 



around shouting, "Facutly !", "Semes- 
ters!", "Grievance!", "Student -Faculty 
Committee!", and other Lebanon Valley 
expressions of alarm. When the smoke 
cleared, seventeen men dlmbed down out 
of the coat-rack. And they had to dig 
a sandwich out of Ed Schmidt's collar. 

Aside to Prof. Light (who is now go- 
ing about with a certain expression on 
his face) : There is very little possibility 
of a sit-down strike. If anything, it 
might be a lie-down affair— for the day- 
student fellas are in the habit of keep- 
ing their southwester extremities glued 
to a chair whenever possible. 

• 

We curt resist a few corsages de 
cacti for Kalo a few weeks ago they 
were thinking of putting on an all-male 
production leaving Delphian holding 

the bag. On Tuesday when they cast 
the play just enough Kalo men hove in- 
to view to grab the roles. 

— VUKatm. 



Henry Irving, John Barrymore and the 
rest. In all, the volume forms a run- 
ning chronicle of the American theatre. 
Aside from the fascination of the sub- 
ject itself, the names of the writers in- 
cluded give the book unusual interesl 
and importance: Irving, Poe, Whitman. 
William Dean Howells, Henry James, 
Iluneker, Nathan, etc. Whether this 
book is considered as a history of the 
theatre, the drama, and acting in Amer- 
ica from lamplight to a spotlight, or as 
a picture of our changing manners and 
tastes; or as representative of the best 
dramatic criticism of every era, The 
American Theatre, as seen by its critics, 
is delightful reading. 

A new volume, by Bernard Shaw, is a 
s.riking addition to the long series of 
plays and prefaces which have left a, 
double line of theatrical and literary 
landmarks throughout the current cen- 
tury. This book contains two full-length 
plays and one short one. The first play, 
The Simpleton of the Unexpected Isles, 
has for its principal incident no less an 
event than the Day of Judgment, 
stripped of all its apocalyptic terrors, 
but brought home with all the author's 
old vigor and sureness of aim as a sub- 
ject of thought. 

The second, The Six of Calais, in which 
Mr. Shaw claims no more than a collab- 
oration with Troissart and Rodin, puts 
on the stage the old chronicle of Edward 
III reluctantly sparing the six burgesses 
at the pleading of his Queen. 

The Millioimaires's, a comedy of char- 
acter in the manner of Ben Jonson, pro- 
viding a spirited "cheval de bataille" for 
the leading actress, gives rise to a re- 
markable preface headed, "On Bosses,'' 
dealing with the problems created by 
irre istibly dominant individuals, such 
as Mussolini, Hitler, Kernal, Riza Khan, 
and innumerable private types, domestic 
and financial. 



FLOOD RELIEF DANCE 

QUITE LIVELY AFFAIR 



(Contiimed from page 1) 



music for the occasion, thus eliminating 
the cost of the orchestra. About forty 
couples attended the dance. Mrs. Green 
and Prof, and Mrs. Carmean acted as 
chaperons. 



Sip a Soda 



at 



Diehl's Drug Store 

Why not take advantage of the many 
services we offer. 



Compliments of 

A. & P. STORE 



C. H. SHEARER, Mgr. 



PEGGY'S BEAUTY 
SHOP 

Special on Frederick Permanent 
Waves 

$4.00 $6.00 

2 blocks West on Sheridan Avenue 



D.L. SAYL0R& 
SONS 

Contractors 

Lumber and Coal 

ANNVILLE, PENNA. 



KREAMER BROS. 

Furniture 
Floor Coverings 
Electric Refrigerators 
Hoover Electric Sweepers 
Electric Washing Machines 

RCA Radios 
FUNERAL DIRECTORS 
Phone 144 ANNVILLE, p A 



JohnHirsh Dept. Sfore 

Men's Leather and Wool Jackets 
Wool Mackinaws 
Weyenberg Shoes 
Phone 145 9-11 W. Main St 

ANNVILLE, PA. 



r? 



For School Supplies and 
Books of all Kinds Go To* 

BOLLMAN'S 

628 Cumberland Street 
LEBANON, PA. 



Meals Served Daily 

Best Sundaes in Town with 
Home Made Ice Cream 
Sandwiches, Cigarettes, Candy 

C. D. BRUNNER 

E. Main St. ANNVILLE, PA. 



Complete Your Food 
Supply For That Midnight 
Lunch By Stopping At 

FINK'S BAKERY 



We sell all types of baked products 
at all hours. 



VALENTINES 
Esbenshade's 



38 N. 8th St., L 



EBANON, P A ' 




"Start the day 

In the Modern way. 

Breakfast at the Penn*» y 

THE PENNWAY HOTE^ 



Cla 
t 
I 

Or 
bus" 
Willi 
were 

ag er 
0a, 

ior c 
Th 
choic 
imp" 
year! 
dusti 
U ' 
siry 
(qui] 
lies 
liter? 
on c 
tion, 
and 
liters 
He i 
posit 
to m 
with 
Le 
more 
eredi 
derte 
gaint 
per 1 
S4o 
know 
will 
task 
The 

(< 

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some 
It 



Th 

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Mir 
ar e j 
'or t 

His , 

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Delphian Dance 




wit 



Good Work, Team 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 




ANNVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 1937 



No. 21 



Clark, Lehman To Head 
1939 Quittapahilla 

NE ws staffappointed 

Classical Motif Planned; Edi 
tor and Bus. Manager Make 
Early Start 

On Friday, February 12, at a special 
iness meeting of the Sophomore class, 

"illiam F. Clark and Clarence Lehman 

e re elected Editor and Business Man- 
ner respectively of the 1939 Quittapa- 
Hlla, the annual publication of the J un- 
•1 class of Lebanon Valley College. 

The sophomores are fortunate in their 
choice of Clark and Lehman for these 
important positions. As co-editor of the 
vearlv production of the Hershey In- 
jagtrial School and a feature writer for 
[ A Vik, Clark has gathered the neces- 
sary experience and ability wherewith to 
oquip himself for the responsibility that 
lies ahead. His natural talent in the 
literary field has earned him recognition 
on campus in the past. He is, in addi- 
tion, a member of the Header's Club 
and Green Blotter Club, two prominent 
literary organizations on the campus. 
He i» peculiarly well qualified for the 
position of editor, and may be expected 
to meet the various problems connected 
with the publication successfully. 

Lehman is another well-known sopho- 
more who may be relied upon to do a 
creditable job in anything that he un- 
dertakes. His past experience was 
gained in the position of business mana- 
ger on the staff of the Hershey High 
School paper. His practicality and 
Knowledge of sound business principles 
will aid him considerably in tlie difficult 
'ask of financing a college yearbook. 
The fact that he has been elected to 

{Continued on Page 2, Column 5) 



ior Class Meeting 
Discusses Activities 



Business of Caps and Gowns, 
Senior Ball, and Class Day 
Taken Up. 



Respite the rather meagre attendance 
p the last meeting of the Senior Class, 
_ re «dent MacMullen dispensed with 
me important business. 
^ was decided that the President's 

S >tl ° n f ° r the Senior Class should be 
; sometime between May Day and 
am,n ation week. 

Ifen daSS V ° ted in favor of using the 

c 0st of of class funcls to hel P defra y the 

in f., Caps an d gowns and also decided 
v °r of 

to tirti • sponsor ' n g dances from time 
^ trj 6 tHe collc ee gym. These dances 



tor ^ Serve as a recreational activity 
N ove r StUdents wno remain on earn- 
er*,, r Week -ends. A small admission 
^se of " e mad e to defray the ex- 



T ° th e music furnished. 



Pr ese ^ e v men mers ( ,f the class who were 

S B a J° ted in favor of having a Se- 

i ^-lass rl 

no d fi y P r °gram was discussed 

S ^d r," 116 aCti °" was taken by the 
L Pr esid lneetin S was adjourned af- 
lfill °Wing ^ Mac Mullen appointed the 
serve as committee mem- 



(0 



7** on Page 2, Column 



B) 



Conservatory Students 
Presented in Recital 



Six conservatory students of advanced 
standing will be presented in recital at 
eight o'clock Tuesday evening, February 
23, in Engle Hall. 

John Zettlemoyer, violin pupil of Har- 
old Malsh; Ruth Goyne and Anita Pat- 
schke, piano pupils of Nella Miller; 
Robert Heckman, organ pupil of R. Por- 
ter Campbell; and Beatrice Fink and 
Virginia Niessner, soprano and contralto, 
respectively, pupils of Alexander Craw- 
ford, will be heard. 

Ruth Keene, mezzo-soprano ; Frank 
Bryan, 'cellist; Elizabeth Bingaman, 
pianist; John Fink, violinist; Edna 
Binkley, organist; Dwight Heiland, cor- 
netist ; Christine Kreider, soprano ; and 
Jean Marbarger, pianist, were heard in a 
studio recital on Monday evening at 
seven o'clock. A violin quartet, Mary 
Anne Cotroneo, Kathryn Yingst, Eugene 
Saylor, and Robert Johns, with Robert 
Clippinger as accompanist, were heard in 
(Contiwued on Paye 2, Column 3) 



West Hall Again Leads 
Day Student Men Trail 

GENERAL AVERAGE 82'; 



Senate Survey Again Shows 
Relative Scholastic Stand- 
ing of Groups 



The scholarship committee of the 
Men's Senate has again completed a 
consideration of semester grades and an 
nounced the results tabulated above 
The figures serve to settle the question 
concerning the relative merits of Dor- 
mitory and Day Students in the first se- 
mesters work. 

In the above statistics, an increase of 
two percent over the mid-semester fig- 
ure is noted in the average of West 
Hall. The South Hall average has also 
made a creditable advance, as have 
those of the other women's groups. On 
the contrary, the average of the Day 
Student men has suffered a relapse in 
the vicinity of three percent. The resi- 
dent men students have also fallen below 
par. From this we derive the significant 
fact thai the averages of the women 
have risen, while those of the men have 
dropped below the mid-'-emester stan- 
dard. 

As was noted in a previous issue these 
figures are intended to represent only 
approximations of the actual results. 
(Continued on Page 2, Column 4>) 



Third Dad's Day 
Proves Great Success 

VARIED PROGRAM HELD 

Dads Treated To College Life 
In Extensive Round of En- 
tertainment 



The success of the third Dad's Day of 
Lebanon Valley College is a fair indi- 
cation of its popularity as an annual 
college event. At the banquet on Sat- 
urday evening it was disclosed that thir- 
ty-two fathers were present as guests 
of their sons. It is known, however, 
that more were present during the af- 
ternoon, but found it necessary to leave 
before evening. 

The doings of the day began with a 
program in the conservatory auditorium 
on Saturday afternoon for the entertain- 
ment of the assembled fathers and sons. 
Louis Straub, president of the student 
Y. M. C. A., formally greeted the fa- 
thers from the stage. He then present- 
ed Dean A. H. M. Stonecipher, who 
delivered an address of welcome, placing 
particular emphasis °n the relationship 
'tetween home and college. 

The Amalgamated Agitators, a group 
of college musicians who have appeared 
quite frequently hereabouts, delighted 
the audience with a novelty radio pro- 
gram. Ken Eastland, in the role of an- 
nouncer, introduced the various num- 
bers, which exhibited a striking array of 
talent and originality. The Agitator.* 
consisted of James Ralston, Frankie Di- 
Nunzio, David Foreman, Harry Criswell, 
Warren Brown, Milton Melman, and 
Philip Lester. Soloists on tihe program 
were: Emily Kindt, marimba; Ray 
Zimmerman, voice; John Zettlemoyer, 
violin; and Robert Heckman, organ. 
Sara Light and Robert Clippinger pre- 
sented an organ and piano duo, and a 
(Continued on Page 4, Column 1) 



Eclectic Members Swing 

Saint Valentine looked in upon the 
Eclectic Club Formal Dance Satur- 
day night, February 13, and left in 
his trail strings of varigated hearts 
suspended about the ballroom. The 
dance programs also carried out the 
motif of the occasion. The young la- 
dies, their escorts and several guests 
danced to the swinging rhythms of 
the Greystone Orchestra, in the ball 
room of the General Sutter Hotel at 
Lititz, Pennsylvania. The chaperones 
were Mrs. Green, Miss Gillespie, Prof, 
and Mrs. Carmean. 



Flare-Up Finishes Family Feud 



Oh the Martins and the Coys they were 
reckless mountain boys . • • 

Grizzly mountaineers. Corn likker. Death 
to the clan on t'other side of the ridge, 
the bodacious varmints. And the rifle 
bullets zip thru the old Virginny h. Is. | 

And when the feudsters strike out for 
,hc verdant hills and families of Penn- 
sylvania they bring along their feuds. 
Some such families have settled in the 
Lebanon Valley, and true to form their 
grudges settle with them. Only a short 
time ago one Norwood Garrison al- 
legedly tries to drive over one of his 
"blood enemy's" kinfolk, e. g,-the child 



of Fred Geyer. Now Fred no longer 
totes a shootin' iron, but gone sissy with 
the civilization of Penna., formally 
brings charges of surety of the peace 
against Norwood. The wheels of jus- 
tice rumble, and since the action has 
taken place in territory under the domain 
of John Whitmeyer, Justice of the 
Peace of the fair town of Annville and 
vicinity, Fred and Norwood are brought 
together for a hearing on Friday the 
12th in the evening at J. of P. Whit- 
meyer's office. It seems Fred has a wit- 
ness for his side, Edgar A. Sipe, opulent 
(Continual on page 4, Column 8) 



Anniversary President 




ROMAINE STILES 



Who has been elected anniversary 
president of Delta Lambda Sigma. 
She has been in charge of the plans 
for the 15th anniversary dance of the 
society which will be held in the 
ballroom of the Harrisburg Civic 
Club this coming Saturday night. 



Varsity Five Downs 
Albright and Drexel 

SCORES: 47-34, 40-30 



Billett, Frey, and Kress Are 
Offensive Stars; Defense 
Shows Vast Improvement 

Lebanon Valley's Blue and White 
courtsters obtained a firm hold on third 
place in the collegiate basketball loop 
standings by turning in two impressive 
wins during the past week, the first at 
the expense of Albright's Lions at Read- 
ing and the second at the expense of the 
Drexel Dragons on the home court. 

In each instance second half rallies 
made it possible for the Blue and White 
dribblers to land decisive triumphs, the 
scores of the two contests favoring L. 
V. C. 47 to 34 and 40 to 30. Captain 
Paul Billett totaled 27 points in the two 
games, Raymie Frey counted 29, and 
Ed Kress tallied 18 as the chief offen- 
sive threats, while the Blue and White 
defense proved virtually impregnable in 
both contests, every member of the L. 
V. C. quintet assisting in breaking up 
the passing attacks of the opposition. 

In the Drexel contest, the effective 
guarding of Captain Matt Donaldson 
was an important factor in the Lebanon 
Valley triumph, as the flashy Drexel 
veteran was largely responsible for the 
Dragon victory over the Flying Dutch- 
men several weeks ago. 

"Chief" Metoxen's courtsters played 
sensational ball in the late minutes of 
both the Albright and Drexel encoun- 
ters, and their ability to come back 
strong after opposing rallies in each 
case accounted for the wins as the Leb- 
anon Valley sharpshooters netted some 
beautiful shots and employed a speedy 
passing attack to work men into posi- 
tion for field chances. 

Against Albright, the Flying Dutch- 
men sported their best shooting attack 
of the season and showed particular pro- 
ficiency from the free-throw line with 
a record of fifteen successful conver- 
sions in eighteen chances. 

Lebanon Valley, 47 ; Albright, 34 

Horowitz and Treida sent the Lions 

(Continued on Page 3, Column 2) 



Deltas To Celebrate 
Fifteenth Anniversary 

SATURDAY NIGHT 



Anniversary Dance Will Be 
Held In Harrisburg Civic 
Club Hall 



The event dear to every Delphian 
girl's heart is approaching, namely, the 
annual anniversary dance. The girls 
have consulted their oracle and the 
guardian spirit of the oracle has prom- 
ised that everything will go smoothly, so 
that the dance will be a very successful 
and memorable event. 

The dance is scheduled for this coming 
Saturday night and will be held in the 
ballroom of the Harrisburg Civic Club. 
The club building is located on Front 
Street right along the river (the oracle 
has also promised that there will be no 
flood.) From 8:30 until 11:30 the danc- 
ers will swing to the musical strains of 
The Harrison ians. This orchestra played 
recently at the Saph Hop. The chaper- 
ons for the affair will include President 
and Mrs. Lynch, Dr. and Mrs. Derick- 
son, Prof, and Mrs. Gingrich, Mrs. 
Green, Dr. Lietzau, Dr. and Mrs. Richie, 
Prof, and xMrs. Stokes, and Miss Wood. 
Alumni and friends are also invited. 

Romiaine Stiles, Delphian's anniver- 
sary president, has worked hard to make 
the fifteenth anniversary a success. She 
will lead the reception line. Her sup- 
porting committees who also worked to 
insure success are: Place— Cordelia 
Shaeffer, Elizabeth Bingaman, Kathryn 
Zwally, Mary Webb; Orchestra — Anna 
Morrison, Ruth Rohrer, Nora Franklin, 
Mildred Haas; Favors — Agnes Morris, 
Barbara Bowman, Greta Heiland, Nellie 
Morrison; Invitations and Programs — 
Ella Mason, Kay Wister, Ernestine 
Jagnesak, Alice Richie; Chaperons and 
Alumni — Esther Flom, Rose Tschopp, 
Ethel Houtz, and Margaret Dmck. 



I. L. 0. Staff memoer 
Meets Campus Group 

Miss Carole Rfegelman Dis- 
cusses Construction of Im- 
portant Organization. 

Last Thursday .night Miss Carole Rie- 
gelman of the International Labor Office 
at Geneva addressed members of the 
I. R. C. She is a staff member of that 
organization and has come to the United 
States to help organize a textile con- 
ference in Washington in April. She has 
been secured by the Carnegie Founda- 
tion to speak to several International Re- 
lations Clubs in this state. 

She spoke of the organization and 
work of the I. L. O. since it was begun 
in iqio and since it has been joined by 
the United States in iQ.14. As a staff 
member of the secretariat she is responsi- 
ble only to the chief director rather than 
to any gov't. The representatives at the 
conferences, etc., however, are responsi- 
ble to the organizations which they rep- 
resent in their native country. Repre- 
sentatives are chosen from three groups, 
namely, employer, labor, and govern- 
ment. The first group is chosen from 
the U. S. Chamber of Commerce, the 
second from the A. F. of L., and the 
third from the Department of Labor. 
(Continued on Page 4, Column 4) 



PAGE TWO 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 1937 



P 



ESTABLISHED 1925 



A weekly publication by the Undergraduate Students of Lebanon Valley College 



EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 

Richard A. Baus, '37 



MANAGING EDITOR 

Edgar Messersmith, '37 
ASSISTANT 

Boyd Shaffer, '38 



ASSOCIATE EDITORS 

William H. Earnest, '37 
Louis E. Straub, '37 



EDITORIAL BOARD 

SPORTS EDITOR FEATURE EDITOR 

William H. Earnest, '37 Ixniise Stoner, '38 

REPORTORIAL STAFF 

Mildred Gangwer, '39 .- Conservatopy 

Duey linger, '37 - Kalozeta.v 

Alice Richie, '39 ~ Delphian 

Kenneth Eastland, '37 Piiii.okosmiax 

Grace Naugle, '37 - - Cuonian 

Harold Beamesderfer, '37 Ernestine Jagnesak, '38 

Karl Flocken, '37 Wanda Price, '38 

Eleanor Lynch, '37 Calvin Spitler, '38 

Harold Phillips, '37 Theresa Stefan, '38 

Clifford Barnhart, '38 William Clark, '39 

Elizabeth Bender, '38 Thomas Guinivan, '39 

Sylva Harclerode, '38 Hubert Long, '39 

Samuel Rutter, '89 

BUSINESS BOARD 
BUSINESS MANAGER CIRCULATION MANAGER 

Robert Kell, '37 Elwood Needy, '37 

ASSISTANT ASSISTANT 

Curvin Dellinger, '38 Ernest Weirick, '39 



Sinjfle Copies 5 cents 

Subscription $1.00 per year 



Entered at the Annville, Pa., post office as second class matter, under the Act of 
March 3, 1879. 

Published weekly through the school year, except during holiday vacation and 
examination week. 



REPRESENTED FOR NATIONAL ADVERTISIN3 BY 

National Advertising Service, Inc. 

College Publishers Representative < 
420 Madison Ave. New York. N.Y. 
Chicago - Boston . San Francisco 
Los Anoeles . Portland - Seattle 



Editorial statements are not necessarily the concensus ox opinion of the 
student body or administration. They are merely the opinions 
of the student editor unless otherwise indicated. 



Vol. XIII THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 1937 



No. 21 



SOMETHING TO THINK ABOUT 



The recent floods which spent their havoc in the Ohio and Mississippi Valleys 
and the more recent dust storms which are distressing the citizens of the west and 
southwestern states bring up the question: What can be done to prevent such un- 
balanced circumstances?. 

The American Way of Living is no longer possible. The forests which were 
cut down heedlessly must be replaced; lands now under plow must be reclaimed. 
The rain which falls to the ground is not absorbed to any great depth by the soil. 
The absence of tree; and grass allows the heavy rainfalls to drain into valleys, 
collect in rivers and overflow their banks. If nothing is done about flood control 
immediately, army engineers point out that within a period of 60 years certain 
fertile sections of the I nited States will be nothing mote than desert areas. 

This business of flood control not only requires that dams and reservoirs be 
built in which unnatural excesses of water may collect, but also that whole forest, 
which have been cut (Lwn be replanted. Fields which are now plowed and used 
for the raising of crops must be turned into acres of grass. Army engineers furth- 
er point out that such a project would require an extensive and well-planned pro- 
gram covering a period of at least 40 years to yield a minimum of results. This, 
the engineers say, will go a long way in eliminating dust storms and floods. 

Such a program is being attempted by the present administration. The build- 
ing of dams and reservoirs, reforestation, curtailment of soil erosion are included 
among the flood control program. I nder TVA daims and reservoirs have been con- 
structed in the Tennessee Valley. The. people in this valley were not threatened 
by the recent floods. Instead, the excessive waters of the Tennessee River 
were allowed to collect in the reservoirs built for just that purpose. 

The utilities inune. Jately opposed the construction of these dams. Cheaper 
power rates to consumers of electricity are now possible. Whether or not these 
dams will be used merely as yardsticks for measuring power rates has as yet not 
been decided. But one thing is certain — posterity must be protected as much as 
possible from recurring periods of floods and droughts. Interests of the utilities, 
if needs be, should be ignored. 

The utilities, however, claim that such a flood control program is distinctly 
un-American. Basal principles of the constitution are being ignored, they argue, 
by the fulfillment of this scheme — the modernists are ignoring completely what 
their forefathers fought and died for. The utilities easily find ready ears for their 
emotional pleadings. 

This is all well and good if the citizens of the Ohio and Mississippi Valleys 
every years want to abandon their homes in the dead of winter when the flitod. 
comes and move to higher ground. Then, after the waters recede they may once 
more return to their homes (if they are still there) at peace with their conscience, 
knowing that their forefathers did not die in vain. The sanctity of the Constitution 
has not been condemned by any program which (they have been led to believe) is 
distinctly un-American. 

People can no longer move away from disaster. Steps must be taken to eli- 
minate the causes of these disasters and individual Interests must be ignored for 
the sake of the welfare of the. group. Opposition from individuals must cease if a 
more vigorous and adequate flood control program is to be executed. 



MID-SEMESTER 

Group 

WEST HALL 

WOMEN DAY STUDENTS 

NORTH HALL 

MEN DAY STUDENTS 

SOUTH HALL 

MEN'S DORMITORY 



Average 



84.3 
81.7 
81.2 
80.7 
80.6 
77.8 



TOTAL AVERAGE 81.0 



SEMESTER 



Group 

WEST HALL 

WOMEN DAY STUDENTS 

SOUTH HALL „ 

NORTH HALL 

MEN'S DORMITORY 

MEN DAY STUDENTS 



Average 



86.5 
83.1 
827 
82.2 
78.5 

77-5 



TOTAL AVERAGE 81.8 



First Semester Honor Roll 



Clifford Barnhart 90.8 

Robert Clippinger 94-3 

Lucie Cook 90.9 

Cnrl Dempsey 9 x -3 

William Earnest 9 2 - 1 

Carl Ehrhart 92.3 

Anna Evans 9°-9 

Karl Flocken 910 

Thomas Guinivan 92.5 

Gerald Hasbrouck 91.0 

Arthur Heisch 92.8 

Violette Hoerner 95-0 

Ethel Houtz 92.9 

Charles Kinney 92.2 

Lillian Leisey 90.9 

Sara Light 91.7 

Robert Long 90.8 

Eleanor Lynch 91. 1 

John Marbarger 90.2 

Amy Meinhardt 92.3 

Evelyn Miller 92.0 

Richard Moody 91.4 

Elwood Needy 91.3 

Robert Tschop 92.0 

Robert Smith 92.0 



CONSERVATORY STUDENTS 

PRESENTED IN RECITAL 



(Continued from pivjp 1) 



1 Minuet, by Bach ; Ave Verum, by Mo- 
zart ; and a Scherzo, by Dont. Rita 
Mosher, Anita Patschke, James Ralston, 
-ind Ruth Hershey accompanied the solo- 
ists. A good audience welcomed these 
newcomers to the controversy recital 
stage. 



SENIOR CLASS MEETING 

DISCUSS ACTIVITIES 

(Continued from patje 1) 

bers. Senior Ball : Duey Unger, chair- 
man ; Ruth Buck, Romaine Stiles, 
George Smeltzer. Dance Committee — 
(This committee is to be responsible for 
the week-end dances to be sponsored 
from time to time) Ed. Schmidt, Allen 
Rutherford, Lois Harbold, Grace Naugle. 



Count Your Cuts! 



At the weekly faculty meeting on 
Tuesday, February 16 a measure was 
passed by that body affixing the pen- 
alty for chapel overcuts. 

On page two of the latest College 
Catalogue is the following statement: 

All students are required to at- 
tend the morning chapel service. 
Failure to attend will be ground 
for action by the Faculty upon re 
commendation of the Committee 
on Chapel Attendance. 

Such action was taken by the Fa- 
culty and the penalty for overcuts be- 
comes effective immediately and ap- 
plies to the second semester of this 
college year. The resolution reads as 
follows : 

The number of unexcused Cha- 
pel absences allowed throughout 
me semester be 15; and that for 
each unexcused chapel absence 
above that number, one-fourth 
semester hour be added to the 
number of hours required for 
graduation. 



WEST HALL AGAIN LEADS 

DAY STUDENT MEN TRAIL 



(Continued from page 1) 



Taken as a whole, however, the statistics 
represent the relative positions of the 
competing groups. 

The averaging and compiling of these 
figures is a matter of long hours of pa- 
tient work, and the members of the 
committee are to be congratulated upon 
the completion of their duties in a fair- 
ly short period of time. 

In regards to the number of condi- 
tions and failures among the students 
of all groups, it may be said that they 
are considerably less than in recent 
years. It is the general opinion, how- 
ever, that there was a general tightening 
up in the character of the semester ex- 
aminations, particularly in the science 
departments which invariably feel most 
keenly the incidence of such moves. This 
renewed stringency is reflected in the 
large number of has-been honor stu- 
dents. 

The committee which compiled these 
averages was composed of Roger Saylor, 
Francis MacMullen, and Duey Unger. 



FACULTY NOTES 



CLARK, LEHMAN TO HEAn 

1939 QUITTAP AH j L ^ 

(Continued from paye i) 

that post is evidence of the faith 

ihe class has in his ability. 

"The '39 book," commented 

reply to several queries, "will be pi a ' r ' 

with a classic motif. If no un P v. 
. . . ex Pe<ted 

change is necessary 111 my present 

we may characterize the volume „ 

erary edition. That large literary s . 

is there for a purpose." When ^ 

lioned further, he stated that 

tempt would be made to construct i 



Sunday, Feb. 21, Dr. G. A. Richie 
will speak at the Manor U. B. Church 
for both morning and evening services. 
Dr. Richie will speak in connection with 
the observance of Education Day. 
» # » 

Dr. A. H. M. Stonecipher spoke at 
the Education Day service at Lykens 
last Sunday evening. 



book in as distinctive and origin ' c 
manner as possible, while still retain' * 
all the functions and purposes for 
yearbooks are issued. As this has be 
the ambition of every editor, Clark " 
not alone in that thought. 

As yet Lehman has formed no (Jefinit 
plans for his work. "Our prim ar y ^ 
ject," he stated, "is simply to bend ou r 
energies to producing as fine a book a>, 
we are capable of doing. We expect to 
improve the quality of the technical 
work that has heretofore been done" 
Lehman also anticipates a prolonged 
siege of agents and representatives from 
the various firms engaging in yearbook 
work. 

The complete staff of the 1939 Q-aitta- 
pahilla has been selected, and is listed 
as follows. The appointees have been 
carefully chosen and each member is 
particularly fitted for the position for 
which he or she has been selected. It 
will be noted that the number of mem. 
bers is large in order to insure a maxi- 
mum of variety of originality, and for 
this same reason the staff is organized 
upon very definite lines. Several new 
positions have been created in order to 
secure more efficient functioning. 

Editor-in-Chief— William F. Clark; 
Associate Editor — Robert W. Long; Lit- 
erary Editor — Helen Bartlett; Assodate 
Literary Editors — Merle Baeastow, 
George Yokum, Charles Brown; Contri- 
buting Editor — Amy Meinhardt; Art 
Editor— Sarah K. MacEwen; Photogra- 
phy Editor— Harlan Kinney; Associate 
l*hotography Editors— Dorothy W'ent- 
ling, Amy Monteith; Athletics Editor- 
Carl Dempsey; Technical Assistants- 
John Moyer, Franklin G. /-erbe; Edito- 
rial Secretary— Thomas Guinivan; Typ- 
ists—Lillian Zubroff, Vincent Nagie, 
Audrie Fox, Mildred Gangwer; Business 
Manager^Clarence Lehman; Assistant 
Business Manager— Donald Ludwig; Ad- 
vertising Manager — Howard Baier; As- 
sistant Advertising Managers - -Damon 
Silvers, Samuel Rutter; Secreta-y ttf 
Business Staff— Joseph Thomas. 




"Here's a tip — Long Distance rates 
are reduced ALL DAY SUNDAY 
and after seven every night.' 

• A tip by telephone will 
hurry that check along- 

THE BELL TELEPHONE COMPANY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



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LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 1937 



PAOcl THREE 



'hid, 

n 

lied 

'lati 5) 
a lit. 
staff 
lies. 
; at. 
1 the 
'al , 
»ning 
v hich 

fk j, 

finite 
' ob. 
I ou r 
>k at 
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from 



dtta- 
isted 
been 
sr is 
i for 
I. It 
nem. 
naxi- 
l for 
nized 
new 
:r to 

lark; 

Lit- 
date 
stow, 
mtri- 

Art 
)gra- 
-ciate 
fent- 
tor- 
nts-- 
dito- 
Typ- 
'agie, 
iness 
stant 
; Ad- 

As- 
iiiiun 
y to 



orts Shots 



juninist, c 
ilburgian," Gettysburg College 
1 r jublication, in the February 11 
*** D -Ja to bat for the Bullet five in 



*oeS 



' to certain acid comments in thb 
|#* e t . 0I1 cerning the unsportsmanlike 
''"'""'"t of the G-burg varsity quintet m 
W^ C f I, V. C. - Gettysburg court 
the r ecent " 
cn O unter ' • • • 

_j f Hartzell first attempts to 
reflection upon the column 
stating that the name of the 
lumnist is not mentioned.What 

c ° my fran '- if you wil1 but in " 
h °ect La Vie you will observe 
S L t it is not the policy of the 
1 wspape r to state the names of 
jj e writers of columns and news 
cles. However, the writings 
oearing in this column are al- 
ways penned by the sports edi- 
tor himself, and ye aforemen- 
tioned sports ed. does not mind 
in the least if quotations from 
his column be directly attribu- 
te to him. Therefore, the insin- 
u a|tion that the column lacks 
standing because the name of the 
writer is not mentioned is en- 
tirely out of order. 



tempted. We think that the good Mr. 
Hartzell will he forced to reach but 
one conclusion — the Gettysburg quinte. 
definitely demonstrated that they could 
not take it. 



VARSITY FIVE DOWNS 

ALBRIGHT AND DREXEL 



art» 



Our critic proceeds in his deprecatory 
ittack on the ground that "the column 
was probably written directly after the 
heated battle." Sorry, Mr. Hartzell, but 
vour conclusion is unwarranted and is 
in fact utterly incorrect. This column 
is invariably written Tuesday after- 
noons, and the particular column in 
question was no exception. The com- 
ment included did not consist of mere 
emotional first-thought, but was based 
on first-thought, plus discussion with 
newspapermen and disinterested specta- 
tor, plus duly-considered after-thought. 
* * » 

The good Mr. Hartzell dis- 
missed our remarks concerning 
the conceited attitude of one 
Harry O'Neill with a depreca- 
tory wave of the hand and the 
statement, "the columnist evi- 
dently has never heard of the 
term, "off-night." Please, sir, of 
course we have heard that term, 
but certainly no athlete possess- 
ed with the ability which the 
supreme and exalted Handsome 
Harry apparently thinks he pos- 
sesses should not be subject to 
such difficulties as "off -nights", 
°r at least should be able to out- 
Play any opponent, even on an 
off-night. Furthermore, recogni- 
Zl "g the possibilities of "off- 
mghts", we f ee l certain that any 
st ar afflicted with such troubles 
J"&ht at least adopt a somewhat 
bumble and submissive mien 
while being totally outplayed at 
ttle Pivot position. 

his 6 tt y sDur g columnist admits in 
reniark s anent the situation that he 
only" 01 Persona| lv see the game, and his 
attit u ? al . defense ()f the Gettysburgers' 
to***' " 18 tlle f ()11( )wing counter-inter- 
vin e •' lin ^' menU)er (> f the Ann- 

qiuntet ever challenge an official's 
»nswe r • <,0l 'rse, Mr. Hartzell, the 
bav» I** Self - evi dcnt. Officials' decisions 



U^ ten been questioned before and 



will 



o^ Pv — he questioned again. 
sit Uatio r ' ( ancl thi s, sir, is the particular 
ej *it Q n Under d »scussion) we have nev- 
f eated * con test in which the de- 

"^ber U f fit ' inclu ding practically every 
Sist ent] y °!„ the team of players, so con- 



et d^,j^ r8Ued a gainst obviously cor- 
ne I1S- The G-burgers did not 



e( 'isi ()I1 "T" re,l >arks to one play or one 
Hi f' th Ut m °aned continuously, in 
^•cts * apparent justice of the refs' 



M 8 Q As We pointed out several 
'Vo! a * ' the Bullets undoubtedly re 
^tiftg vv * a t an even break in the offi- 
'° *0Uld C S . incere 'y wish that our crit- 
^frj 1 laW, Wei i h the fa( ' ts thoroughly, 
" e statistics of fouls at 



t&rly tll 



(Continued from page i) 



off to a four-point lead at the outset, 
with Paul liillelt counting the first L. 
V. C. points on a follow-up shot after 
th.ee minutes of action. Raymie Frey 
'hen nabbed the spotlight ai he tallied 
fourteen straight Lebanon Valley points 
on a series of sensational shots, Albright 
in the meantime registering live more 
counters. With the score favoring L. V. 
C, 16 to 9, Paul Billett took up the 
scoring duties for the Blue and White 
and counted eight points, while the Li- 
ons were counting six to bring the score 
to 24-15 at the half-time intermission. 
Frey tallied two fouls soon after play- 
was resumed and Ed Kress broke into 
the scoring column to increase the L. V. 
C. advantage to 28-15. At this point the 
Lions staged a determined rally that 
netted them twelve successive points and 
enabled them to cut the Valleyite mar- 
gin to a single point at 28-27. Lebanon 
Valley came right back with a sensa- 
tional counter-attack, and with Kress 
leading the way, the Flying Dutchmen 
completely routed their foes, registering 
seventeen points to three for the oppo- 
sition during the next eight minutes of 
play and coasting through the last sev- 
eral minutes to a 47-34 win. Frey with 
20 points, Paul Billett with 12, and 
Kress with 11 were the offensive stars 
of the game. 

Lebanon Valley, 40; Drexel, 30 

Nannos counted for Drexel on a long 
stab, with foul conversions by Frey and 
Billett deadlocking the score in the 
opening minutes. Drexel pulled away to 
a 12-6 lead as Snell counted field goals 
for L. V. C. on a sensational shot from 
midcourt and a one-handed poke from 
sidecourt and the Dragons counted four 
charity chances and field goals by Lig- 
nelli on two sleeper shots and by Lay- 
ton on a follow-up. Frey netted a long 
shot, Kress converted two fouls, and 
Billett counted a follow-up chance to 
deadlock the count. Lignelli registered 
a free toss and i^ebanon Valley assumed 
the lead for the first time when Billett 
took a pass from Brown for a twin- 
counter. Another field goal by Billett. 
increased the margin, but two charity 
throws by Layton and another peep for 
Lignelli gave Drexel the edge, 17 to 16. 
Kress tied the score when he was fouled 
by Lignelli as the half-time whistle blew. 

Frey's field goal from under the bas- 
ket was cancelled by Matt Donaldson's 
only field goal of the evening as the sec- 
ond half got under way, and Brown's 
nifty long shot was negatived by Mule's 
two-pointer. A follow-up shot and a 
long shot by Captain Paul Billett gave 
Lebanon Valley a lead which was never 
relinquished, the score favoring the Fly- 
ing Dutchmen, 25 to 21. Lay ton's field goal 
and Nannos' singleton reduced this mar- 
gin to a single point, but successive one- 
handed stabs by Kress and Billett split 
the cords beautifully for another quartet 
of points. Kress and Frey counted 
again from the field for L. V. C, with 
Layton retaliating with a follow-up for 
I he Dragons. Frey registered two points 
on a set shot with Billett doing a nice 
bit of blocking, and an amazing follow- 
up shot by the L. V. C. captain on a 
difficult chance gave Lebanon Valley a 
substantial lead at 37-26 with four min- 
utes to go. Layton counted his fourth 
follow-up chance, and Lignelli converted 
two fouls called on Kress, who retired 
via the four-foul route. Ed Bachman, 
playing his first game for the Valley- 
varsity, replaced him at the forward 
post. Bob Brown converted a foul called 



on Kulesh, who had subbed for Rhile, 
and Clair Snell counted another long 
.-.hot as the final whistle blew, with the 

linal figures reading: L. V. C., 40; Drex- 
el, 30. 

The summaries: 

LEBANON VALLEY 

u. r. t. 

P. Billett f 3 6 12 

it. Billett f 

Kress f 4 3 11 

Frey c 7 6 20 

Snell g 2 4 

•>rown g 

Speg g 

Totals 16 15 47 

ALBRIGHT 

c. r. t. 

Treida f 3 17 

Comba f 2 4 

Hichie f 10 2 

Knox f.-c 2 2 

Horowitz c 3 6 

Oslislo g 

Hiffle g 2 4 

DeLorenzo g 1 1 

McFadden g 

Bonner g 4 8 

Totals 15 4 34 

LEBANON VALLEY 

G. F. T. 

P. Billett f 7 1 15 

.viess f 2 3 7 

Bachman f 

Frey c 4 19 

Snell g 3 6 

Brown g 113 

Totals 17 6 40 

DREXEL 

G. F. T. 

Donaldson f.-g 13 5 

Nannos f 113 

Kulesh f 

Layton c 4 2 10 

Lignelli g 3 4 10 

Rhile g 1 2 

1 . _ A ~~~ 

Total 10 10 30 



L V. C. Frosh Courtmen 
Drop Brace Of Prelims 



The Blue and White Frosh dropped a 
pair of decisions in preliminary contests 
played during the past week, the Al- 
bright Freshmen and the Central Penn- 
sylvania Business College dribblers de- 
feating the Valley Greenies by scores of 
53-32 and 27-22. 

The Lion Frosh completely dominated 
play throughout in registering an over- 
whelming victory, but the C. P. B. C. 
tossers were held on even terms during 
the second half, although the Valleyites 
never seriously threatened their oppo- 
nents' lead. 

Artz, Schaeffer, and Seiverling were 
the top scorers in the Albright game, 
while Artz, and Grimm split high honors 
in the Central Pennsy contest. 

The summaries : 

L. V. C. Frosh 

G. F. T. 

Belmei- F, C 2 2 

Seiverling F 3 1 7 

Artz F 3 3 9 

Geesey C 3 3 

Schaeffer G 408 

Kreiser G 102 

Grimm G oil 

Whitman G 000 

Totals 11 10 32 

Albright Frosh 

G. F. T. 

Shwartz F 306 

Nosal F oil 

Levandusky F 102 

Doremus F 5 2 12 

Hess F 215 

Thorpe C 000 

Azmund C 113 

Czaikowski G 5 3 13 

Hydock G 215 



McCrann G 2 

Totals . 21 

L. V. C. Frosh 
G. 

Artz F 3 

Grimm F 3 

Seiverling F 1 

Belmer C o 

Geesey C 2 

Schaeffer G 1 

Kreiser G 

Totals 10 

C. P. B. C. 
G. 

Sowers F 3 

Gasteiger F o 

Smith F 4 

I Whipple C 5 

Garman G 

Graham G o 

Totals 12 



F. 



53 



T. 
6 

6 

4 

o 

4 
2 




T. 
8 


9 
10 

o 
o 

27 



Practice Game Prepares 
Girls To Play Albright 

There was a practice game on Mon- 
day afternoon between the Lebanon Val- 
ley girls and the Annville High School 
team. All the girls took part in an at- 
tempt to effect the best combinations to 
be used in the game with Albright this 
Friday. 

In the dormitory and day student 
games the Annville Day Students are 
setting the pace, having won the three 
games that they have played. The stand- 
ing of the teams is as follows : 

Games Played W L 

Annville Day Students 3 3 

North Hall 3 2 1 

Out-of— town Day Students . 2 1 1 

West Hall 2 1 1 

South Hall 3 3 




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JUDGE -THEY 
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LAST LONG.' r> 




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PRINCE ALBERT 

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PAGE FOUR 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 1937 



Needs of Dark Africa 
Outlined For Students 



A B 



razen 



Head 



Prof. Martin, Formerly Affili- 
ated With L. V. C. Faculty, 
Brings Message 



Illustrating with slides and motion pic- 
tures an address to the student body on 
Wednesday morning, Professor William 
N. Martin of Wyomissing made an ap- 
peal for understanding of the problems 
and needs of Africa- Prof. Martin was 
well qualified to discuss Lebanon Val- 
ley College's branching out to foreign 
fields ; he has served as an educator 
both in Africa and at Annville. 

Prof. Martin first eulogized the col- 
lege's achievements, especially in pre- 
paring educators for African service. 
His lecture and slides were dedicated 
to those of L. V. C. who served in the 
Dark Continent. Singing "We've a Story 
to Tell to the Nations," the student body 
voiced its determination to assist in the 
elimination of darkness over there. 

Tracing the history of white men's re- 
lations with Africa, Prof. Martin showed 
how the population, resources, and land 
have been exploited. He expressed the 
need for a new attitude toward the peo- 
ple and their problems, especially the ig- 
norance of the aborigines. He suggested 
that much can be done if students in 
Annville will sacrifice chewing gum, 
smokes, and flowers to help their needy 
neighbors abroad. Prof. Martin stressed 
the fact that South Africa can be 
reached from New York in less than two 
weeks. Africans are now really, neigh- 
bors, who may prove troublesome ones 
unless we lend them a helping hand. 

Motion pictures and slides showed 
scenes at Cape Town, Johannesburg, Pre- 
toria, Zululand Durban, and Freetown. 
Lebanon Valley College students were 
interested in seeing a present student at 
Annville among the men at Albert Aca- 
demy in Tierra Leone. 

Prof. Martin, who graduated in the 
class of 1918, was principal of Lebanon 
Valley Academy and an instructor of 
Mathematics at Lebanon Valley College 
from 1918 to 1920; missionary at Albert 
Academy, 1920 to 1926 ; principal of Al- 
bert Academy, 1924 to 1926; and assist- 
ant professor of Biology at Lebanon Val- 
ley College, 1927 to 1928. 



THIRD DAD'S DAY 

PROVES GREAT SUCCESS 



(Continued from page 1) 



trombone quartette composed of Frank 
Bryan, Philip Le.5ter, Warren Brown, 
and Dennis Geesey made a further con- 
tribution. Sara Light furnished the ac- 
companiment for the solo numbers. 

At the conclusion of thi ! program the 
entire group migrated to the adminis- 
tration building, where campus movies 
were being shown in the biology lecture 
room on the third floor. Mr. Clements 
operated the projector, while Dr. Der- 
ickson commented on t he views shown, 
which were of a variety of school acti- 
vities, many of them in technicolor. 

The banquet held in tin' evening in 
the large dining hall climaxed the day's 
activities. Dr. R. R. Butterwick, acting 
in the capacity of toastmaster, present- 
ed Dr. W. A. Wilt, who led in prayer 
and, after an excellent dinner, the other 
speakers— Dr. Clyde A. Lynch, who gave 
an address of welcome; |)uey Unger, 
who represented the sons; Rev. O. T. 
Khrhart, who spoke for the fathers; and 
Dr. G. A. Richie, Who elaborated on 
some angles of current college sports. 
Professor Cannean led the group sing- 
ing, and James Ralston, a student in 
the conservatory, augmented the pro- 
gram with a piano number. The banquet 
terminated with the singing of the Alma 
Mater. 



. . . by art 
W hich shall unfold strange CtcmbtS mid 

aphorisms . . . 

— Greene. 



I am told that 1 need not to be 
ashamed on the account of being but a 
brass head, since that of my predecessor 
was a wooden one. Now it is a fact well 
known to neocromancers and others that, 
of all material for a head, wood is the 
very poorest, since it tends to rot from 
within and is very insensitive to stimuli 
from without. This condition, the phv- 
sickians say, transforms a head of wood 
after a short time into a hot-bed of foul- 
smelling excrudescences which macerate 
the ideas and spoil the workings that 
emanate from it. 

• 

And indeed I know men say of him 
who was so possessed that his whilom 
scrivenings were but a literary flirtation 
which casted their tautological flattery 
upon the feminine eye with an asininity 
you would not believe possible even to 
Ihe great donkey he made himself in 
masculine eyes. Alas, poor Villiann is 
dead. He died of the rheum, caught 
while singing in an off key beneath the 
window of his lady, and no wonder, for 
he labored painfully through the same 
tune for patient weeks on end, in rain 
or frost or snow, easting about his or- 
chids and his cacti, his gardenias and 
his onions like a distributor of adver- 
tising circulars whose handbills con- 
cerned themselves only with his affairs 
and those of his friends. When one of 
them was hurt by the inconsiderate out- 
side world Villiann rushed at the invader 
like a mother swine protecting her 
young, splashing mud on everyone as 
she does so. 

• 

Sime it is a departure from the policy 
oT the Brazen Head to take a stand for 
any individual, a good-humored toler- 
ance of all, being one of the philosophi- 
cal properties it is supposed to derive 
'rom its metallic nature, T shall discuss 
10 further the reasons which brought 
about the regrettable downfall of my 
mtecedent, unless his bones return to 
disturb my reading. If they were to do 
this, in sooth, Fri ir Bar-on says it would 
nave an effect on my placid surface like 
>nly to that of a potion of vitriol or 
oyal waters, which make me to boil and 
seethe for a time, until I absorb them. 
After this my surface is even more shin- 
ing than before, since their chief effect 
's to remove the surface dirt and grime 
that gather on me in my musty retreat 
which is seldom swept because I lack 
the body to perform such tnsks. Indeed, 
that is why men say I am fit for nothing 
but writing and study. 



To me, however, it was but cause for 
merriment, a feeling which I confess 1 
am unable to share with those in whose 
breasts it rises as a result of the follow- 
ing' note which was read to me by the 
Friar: 
To La Vie: 

Ever since the last issue of the "Quit- 
tie" we have been wondering what that 
Th.B. has meant after Hill Grosz's name. 
However, since chapel last Thursday we 
have come to the conclusion that it 
means "Bachelor of the Throbbing 
Heart." (Fire, fire, fire, fire!) 



Fire indred ! 
has spoken. 



But the Hra/en Head 



FLARE-UP FINISHES 

FAMILY FEUD 



(Continued from page 1) 



My time, however, is not so wholly 
taken up wi!h books that I could fail 
to observe from my vitriate window, of 
in afternoon this week, the curious 
spectacle two young ladies were pleased 
to present by playing a game called 
Leap-Frog upon the greensward. And 
"or a truth, even a brass head could not 
fail to notice that they were clad only 
in gymnasium clothing— a fact which did 
not cause me to look away until they 
had proceeded in this eccentric fashion 
s far as the portico of North Hall, at 
which point they desisted in order to 
enter that abode. While such a proceed- 
ing aroused my interest, that which fol- 
lowed stirred my to philosophical spec- 
ulations as to what could be the cause 
of it, for one of them ran lightly back 
across the campus to administer to a 
young gentleman then passing what 1 
believe is known as a swift kick. 
• 

\fter much pondering of this mailer 
I concluded that it could arise from no 
other reason than thai which inspired a 
young gentleman to attend a lecture in 
English literature the same day with his 
hook supported on a tnusiek stand. This 
matter, it seems, wonders men sorely. 



landlord and sole proprietor of Sipe- 
town, who is scheduled to appear against 
Norwood. Waal, Edgar doesn't appear. 

Shortly before proceedings commence 
Norwood cal'clates to get a bit of air 
in his nostrils, and with a few of his 
women- folk strolls out on the porch. 
Then things begin to happen — for we 
hear a shot — bang! — and in walks Nor- 
wood exclaiming, — "I'm shot !" — so help 
me. But everybody thinks, — "Pooh, a 
gag." — people don't get theirselves shot 
on J. of P. Whitmeyer's porch — so on 
with the hearing. Presently, however, 
blood seeps thru Norwood's clothing and 
even the more dubious begin to think- 
that maybe he's right— and Norwood is ; 
he has a nice little hole right thru his 
shoulder. 

Who is the culprit? Where is the 
ibsent witness? 

Officer Ristenbatt, uniform and all, 
charges into the fray — Constable Arndt 
"Hans" Brighton, having seen the ruck- 
us while patrolling the campus in the 
vicinity of the library also charges — 
they surround the house. There skulking 
in the dark and shadowy yard is a figure 
which cries, "Who the heck are you?" 
— and boldly comes the reply, "The 
Law-" — (da! da! we alweez get our 
man!) Constable "Hans" with enviable 
disregard for culprits with loaded guns 
lays hand on the prisoner and effects the 
pinch. Officer R. puffs and asks for the 
gun — whereupon our culprit secures the 
safety catch (and maybe even wipes off 
his fingerprints, cleans the barrel, and 
slips in a fresh cartridge) and Officer R. 
snaps on his nicely nickeled manacles. 
When the light falls on our culprit's 
face we see — sure enough — Mr. Sipe. 

Meanwhile the ambulance has arrived 
and Norwood is flicked off to the Good 
Samaritan Hospital. The state police are 
summoned into the case and they make 
a record dash from Hershey. While they 
are dashing, an irate red-haired female 
kin folk does a good bit of high talking 
a most unflattering manner to Mr. 
Sipe — who expresses fear that she may 
have a knife concealed and that she may 
even want to use it on him (brr, nice 
people!) — Constable "Hans" puts her 
in her place and some semblance of or- 
der is achieved. Mr. Geyer, hardly so 
much as opens his mouth all this time. 
And while we wait for the troopers Ed- 
ear hires himself a counsel — Attorney 
Gingrich. 

The police arrive and Sipe explains 
that he did his little deed purely in self- 
defense as Norwood has thrown a very 
unhealthy-looking wrench at him (while 
our red-haired damsel hurls expletives). 
Howsomever the state troopers want 
Edgar for considerable palaver and move 
to hie the villain off to the Hershey bas- 
tille. But Counsel Gingrich adds that 
since he is regularly retained he too must 
accompany the group to the pow-wow ; 
while counsel dons his hat and coat the 
:oppers pull a sneak and lam off to their 
goal alone. This inconsiderate action in- 
furiates Attorney Gingrich no little, so 
he grabs the telephone and scolds who- 
ever is the boss cop plenty and reminds 



him of that great document, the U. S. 
Constitution, and how people get in 
trouble who disregard it, just see what 
is happening out in Somerset ! With 
that he disgustedly prepares to retire — 
only to be interrupted by a sharp pealing 
of the doorbell. — More mountaineers? — 
We hope not ! — But no, there are five 
policemen (having broken their former 
record for dashes betwixt Hershey and 
Annville) — and each one of them apolo- 
gizes quite nicely and they admit their 
gross error and want to square them- 
selves — so counsel allows them to drive 
him to Hershey (on another of their 
dashes) to visit his client and bring 
him home again. It always pays to know 
the law ! 

So the surety of the peace proceedings 
wind up with no action, except : mm a 
thrown wrench, a shot, a capture by 
"Hans" and Officer R., a client for 
Prof. Gingrich, an apology to that same 
gentleman by the state's guardians of 
the law, a charge of aggravated assault 
and battery with intent to kill for Mr. 
Sipe, a vacation in the Good Samaritan 
Hospital with stiffness in the shoulder 
for Norwood, a bit of excitement for 
Annville — and a fued claims another vic- 
tim, only up hyar it's a crime — and 
Crime Don't Pay, no sir! 

It should be a pleasure for our genia! 
columnist to award this week's orchids 
to "Hans", Attorney Gingrich, and the 
state police. 



L. O. STAFF MEMBER 

MEETS CAMPUS GROUP 



(Continued from page 1) 

The speaker stated that many treaties 
of interest to labor have been ratified by 
the I. L. O. More than seven hundred 
treaties have been ratified by the vari- 
ous governments. Tfiese treaties in- 
cluded a forty-eight hour week, elimina- 
tion of the use of poison in matches, 
and agreements on similar subjects. 

Practically all the more important na- 
tions of the world send representatives 
to the I. L. O. The tripartite delegates 
must present sufficient credentials to the 
conference to be accepted. Some time 
ago those of Italy and Germany were 
not accepted, and the delegates were 
withdrawn- Italy, however, continues to 
pay her dues and remains a member of 
the I. L. O. The United States, since 
it joined the office in 1934, has taken an 
active part in the affairs. Russia, which 
at first appeared antagonistic, has also 
taken an active interest. 

When questioned on the general Eu- 
ropean situation, Miss Riegelman stated 
that war had been very imminent at the 
"ime of the German occupation of the 
Rhineland. She stated that barricades 
had been erected on both sides of the 
Rhine and that soldiers on both sides 
were expecting orders to fight. A small 
incident would have been sufficient to 
light the torch. Affairs in Europe to- 
day seem to be even more desperate. 

Miss Riegelman appeared in chapel on 
Friday and gave a technical description 
of the work of the I. L. O. She also 
spoke to several economics and history 
classes before leaving the campus. 



RENU SHOP 

One Day Service 
Dry Cleaning, Pressing, Repairing 
11 E. Main St. ANNVILLE, PA. 



D.L. SAYLOR $ 
SONS 

Contractors 

Lumber and Coal 

ANNVILLE, PENNA 



KREAMER BROS. 

Furniture 
Floor Coverings 
Electric Refrigerators 
Hoover Electric Sweepers 
Electric Washing Machines 

RCA Radios 
FUNERAL .DIRECTORS 
Phone 144 ANNVILLE, p A 



John Hirsh Dept. Store 

Men's Leather and Wool Jackets 
Wool Mackinaws 
Weyenberg Shoes 
Phone 145 9-11 W. Main St 

ANNVILLE, PA. 



For School Supplies and 
Books of all Kinds Go To- 

BOLLMAN'S 

628 Cumberland Street 
LEBANON, PA. 



Meals Served Daily 

Best Sundaes in Town with 
Home Made Ice Cream 
Sandwiches, Cigarettes, Candy 

C. D. BRUNNER 

E. Main St. ANNVILLE, PA. 



Complete Your Food 
Supply For That Midnight 
Lunch By Stopping At 

FINK'S BAKERY 



We sell all types of baked products 
at all hours. 



j No College Man Can Afford 
J To Disregard His Appear- 
| ance. 

j "Make it a Rule to Visit Us 
j Once a Week" 



KARL'S SHOP 

Corner Main and White Oak 




'Start the day 

In the Modern way. 

Breakfast at the Pennway 



THE PENNWAY HOTEL 







Dr 

U 
"IV 



si 

Lebf 
of * 

(3yd 

Vail 

eittit 

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ton« 

tifte 

logic 

the 

on e 

Li 
tory 
sanu 
will 
■lusi 

Tl 
ly t( 
"Tlx 
brea 
says 
teria 
mor< 
lives 
colle 
dent 
colle 
and 
ties.' 
acad 
crite 
pies 
date 
ter, 
effici. 
visee 

Tli 
Clini 
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just 
dresj 
turn 

I'OW 

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Wi 
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Lff fl Comes Through j 



Beat the Bruins 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 




ANNVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 1937 



No. 22 



n r Lynch To Speak 
Over Station WKBO 

u MAYBERRY TO SING 

"Mental Hygiene and the Col- 
lege Student" Is the Sub- 
ject of Address 

gpcaking under the auspices of the 
ebanon County Mental Health Clinic, 
f which he is one of the directors, Dr. 
Clvde A. Lynch, President of Lebanon 
Valley College, will deliver an address 
entitled "Mental Hygiene and the Col- 
lege Student" over radio station WRBO 
tomorrow at 4:30 p. m. The talk, lasting 
^en minutes, will treat of the psycho- 
logical adjustments and problems which 
the individual is forced to confront up- 
on entering college. 

Lucille Maberry, of the Conserva- 
tory of Music, will also be heard on the 
same program with Dr. Lynch. Lucille 
will present a vocal selection at the con- 
tusion of the address. 

The speaker will confine himself main- 
ly to the sphere of the college student. 
"The number of mental defects and 
breakdowns among college students," 
says Dr. Lynch, "could be reduced ma- 
terially if mental hygiene were taken 
more seriously by those who guide the 
lives of those young people below the 
college level. The less freedom a stu- 
dent has experienced before going to 
college, the greater will be his problem 
and the problems of the college authori- 
ties." He also . stresses the fact that 
academic achievements are not the only 
criteria of college success. "Many exam- 
ples of campus maladjustment are asso- 
ciated with viscera instead of gray mat- 
ter > and gray matter cannot function 
efficiently until it becomes master of the 
viscera." 

Th e Lebanon County Mental Health 
Clinic, which Dr. Lynch represents, is 
*o agency that is trying to give aid in 
J us t such matters as outlined in the ari- 
(lre M. It would profit all students to 

urn the dial to station WKBO tomor- 

l0 * at 4:30 and listen to Lebanon Val- 

ej s President discuss this important 
subject. 



Tommy Rutledge Lost 



til 

Pie St, 
h y the 



e at the Rutledge home on Ma- 
rket has been enlivened recently 



activities of one "Tommy," 
ty^ rge Edward's new playmate- 
l ast e " Rutledges were in Florida 

a ttach iStmaS ' George K became so 
Slla , ^ to "Tommy" that he per- 
We^ h ' S paren *s to adopt him. A 
t ne c °nsternation reigned while 

fr ant . Use an d neighborhood were 
ch a i a '^ lly se arched. Calmly and non- 
hu Ilgr y tne little fellow appeared, 
W as f~ f ° r his meal - His Punishment 

iche- 6 ^ 0t more tnan twelve 



st ay in the basement for most 



°f th 
h 

■nches 
'hat SDfi 

1,li ssilr,;^* known as the alligator 



-nes i, 1 * »»».■» ~ 

k*. . g \ of which at least six 
s tail, "Tommy" belongs to 



,lSsi Ppiensis. 



PHI ALPHA EPSILON 
ROLL ANNOUNCED 

The following seniors have been placed 
on the roll of Phi Alpha Epsilon, the 
local honorary scholarship society : Rich- 
rd Baus, William Earnest, Karl Flocken 
Charles Kinney, Burritt Lupton, Eleanor 
Lynch, Francis MacMullen, Grace Nau- 
gle, and John Zimmerman. These stud- 
ents, in accordance with the provisions 
of the society, have attained an average 
88 per cent during the first three and 
half years of their college course and 
have maintained a good moral character. 

Phi Alpha Epsilon was instituted on 
our campus three years ago. The total 
membership of the society now stands 
at twenty-six. 



Writers Complete Plans 
For La Vie Supplement 

Tea And Cakes Wind Up 
Green Blotter Meeting ; 
Plan To Fill Vacancies 



Thursday, February 18, at 8 p. m. the 
members of the Green Blotter Club met 
at the home of Dr. and Mrs. Struble. 
Betty Bender was present as a guest of 
the club. 

Head Scop Maxine Earley explained 
that the purpose of the meeting was to 
read and approve all articles to be in- 
cluded in the Green Blotter Supplement 
of next week's La Vie. The club as a 
whole acted as critic. During the even- 
ing plans were discussed for forming 
pen names other than those in use. With 
the exception of one member who was 
given permission to change his name, the 

(Continued on Page 3, Column 2) 



Washington Subject 
Dr. Shenk's Talk 

AT HERSHEY SUNDAY 



Speaks To Industrial School 
Boys In Morning; Com- 
munity In Afternoon 

Dr. Shenk has had a very busy sched- 
ule recently, having been called upon by 
various organizations in this vicinity to 
speak about Washington, whose 205lh 
birthday anniversary was commemorat- 
ed on Monday. 

On Sunday Dr. Shenk delivered two 
addresses in Hershey as a part of their 
celebration. Some Elements of Washing- 
ton's Greatness was the theme of his 
talk to the boys of the Hershey Indus- 
trial School in the morning. Many fac- 
tors, too many for enumeration, contri- 
buted to the development of the noble 
Character of the Father of our Country. 
Among the most significant were his 
self-control, loyalty, courage, and sense 
of justice, together with a great faith 
that formed the capstone of his char- 
acter. 

At the community service held Sunday 
afternoon in the Hershey Community 
Theater, Washington as President was 
Hie basis of Dr. Shenk's address. When 
Washington was inaugurated he faced 
the serious problems involved in creat- 
ing a government in the midst of the 
Chaotic conditions that prevailed in this 
(Continued on Page 2, Column 4) 



Fifteenth Anniversary 
Observed By Delphians 

HELD AT CIVIC CLUB 

Successful Dance Featured By 
Playing of Harrisonians ; 
Faculty Members Present 



Delphian Literary Society, under the 
excellent leadership of Romaine Stiles, 
inniversary president, held its 15th an- 
niversary- dance in the ballroom of the 
Harrisburg Civic Club last Saturday ev- 
ening. The traditioral week-end rains 
stopped long enough on Saturday even- 
ing to allow the dancers to escape a 
drenching. 

The members of the society and their 
escorts were in high spirits. Among the 
alumnae present were Charlotte Stabley 
and Loiuse Bishop who graduated in 
1936. 

A brown suede combination wallet 
and cigarette case on which the green 
letters of five society were embossed in 

(Continued on Page 4, Column 3) 



University Women Unite 
Dr. Lietzau Named Head 

Former members oi the American As- 
sociation of University Women met re- 
cently in Delphian Hall to organize an 
Annville Branch of the Association. Dr. 
Lena Louise Lietzau, of the Department 
of German, was elected president. Other 
officers are Miss S. Lucile Shenk, Leba- 
non Valley College and the University 
of Pittsburgh, vice-president ; Mrs. 
Harry S. Ruhl, Smith College, secretary ; 
Mrs. Amos Black, Marietta College and 
Ohio State University, a former treas- 
urer of the Cornell Branch of the Asso- 
ciation, treasurer; Mrs. O. Edgar Rey- 
nolds, Northwestern and Purdue Uni- 
versites, member of the board of trus- 
tees. Members of the college faculty who 
are connected with the work of the new 
organization are Dr. Stella Johnson 
Stevenson, Professor of French; Miss 
Mary E. Gillespie, Director of the Con- 
servatory of Music; Mrs. Ruth Engle 
Bender, of the Conservatory faculty;' 
Miss Ella Moyer, also of the Conserva- 
tory faculty ; Miss Margaret Wood, in- 
structor in hygiene and political science ; 
Miss Esther Henderson, director of phy- 
sical education for women ; Miss Helen 
Ethel Myers, librarian; Miss Gladys 
Fencil, assistant reg>i|Strar ; and Miss 
Esther Shenk, English assistant. At a 
general meeting of the organization to 
be held in Delphian Hall, Monday even- 
ing, March i, at 7=30 o'clock, Miss Ra- 
chael Turner, a former president of the 
Harrisburg Branch of the Association, 
will speak. 



Lynchs Hosts To 

Undergrads 

President and Mrs. Clyde A. Lynch 
will be at home to the college classes 
from 3 :30 to 5 -30 o'clock on the fol- 
lowing afternoons: 

Junior Class— March 2. 

Sophomore Class— March io. 

Freshman Class— March 17. 

The Senior Class will be entertained 
at a banquet on the evening of May 
10. 



MISS STEFAN GETS 
BURTNER AWARD 

Theresa Stefan, a member of the Ju- 
nior Class, was chosen by the faculty to 
receive the Alice Evers Burtner Memo- 
rial Award. 

This fund was established two years 
ago by the husband and son of Mrs- 
Burtner to perpetuate her memory. 

This scholarship, which amounts to 
$100, is applied to the account of the 
student for the Senior year. 

The recipient is chosen by the faculty 
on the basis of scholarship, character, 
social promise, and financial need. 



Philo Plans Anniversary 
At Meeting Ihis Week 

Eastland Installs Committees 
For Annual Program To Be 
He'd In May 



Tuesday noon in their society hall Phi 
Lambda Sigma held its weekly meeting. 
President Straub discussed the project 
of teaching the new members to dance. 
He assured the members that the per- 
mission of the faculty had been granted, 
and asked that the members realize that 
this was not to be a social hour. He felt 
that through these classes more men 
would be able to dance and enjoy the 
anniversary. As the session had been 
called for the purpose of discussing the 
plans of the anniversary, the meeting was 
then turned over to the Anniversary 
President who outlined his plans. The 
(Continued on page 4, Column 3) 



Diplomat Dribblers 
Trounce Valleyites 

ON LANCASTER COURT 



Snodgrass and Sponagle Star 
As Defending Champs Con- 
tinue Undefeated 



F. and M.'s Diplomat courtsters 
clicked on every cylinder to land an ov- 
erwhelming 60-25 win over the Flying 
Dutchmen last week on the spacious 
Lancaster Armory court. 

The Franklin and Marshall defending 
champs flashed their most brilliant at- 
tack of the season in downing the Val- 
leyites, who seemed completely lost on 
the immense floor. The L. V. C. drib- 
blers just could not get along and they 
never had a look-in on the ball game af- 
ter the Diplomats had jumped away to 
an 8-0 lead at the outset. 

F. and M. sported an overwhelming 
advantage at 38-12 at the intermission 
and dominated play throughout the en- 
tire contest to land a triumph by a de- 
cisive 35-point margin. 

Stew Snodgrass, the league's leading 
scorer, counted 22 points for the Diplo- 
mats, with Woody Sponaugle taking sec- 
ond honors with l(i points from his pivot 
position. 

Captain Paul Billett was moved to a 
guard post to watch Snodgrass during 
(he second halt' and held the Diplomat 
star to four points during the last twen- 
ty minutes of play. 

(Continued on Page 3, Column 4) 



Bucknell Bisons Fall 
Before LY.C Attack 

IN THRILLING CONTEST 



Snell' s Foul Conversion, P. 
Billet's Long Shot Provide 
Winning Margin 



Lebanon Valley's varsity quintet up- 
et Bueknell's Bison dribblers by a 52- 
49 count in a thrilling contest on the 
Harrisburg Madrid Palestra court last 
week. 

A foul conversion by Clair Snell and 
a long field goal by Paul Billett provid- 
ed the Flying Dutchmen with their mar- 
gin of victory after the Bisons had 
deadlocked the count at 49-all with two 
.dilutes of play remaining. 

Both contesting teams exhibited ac- 
curate shooting in the high-scoring fray, 
with Raymie Frey copping top honors 
with nine field goals and one foul for a 
total of nineteen points. The Billett 
brothers combined to account for twen- 
ty points, with Kress, Snell, and Brown 
dividing the remaining thirteen count- 
ers. 

For the Bucknell outfit, Foltz and 
. width were the most important scorers 
vvith 18 and 16 points respectively. 

Field goals by Kress and Frey sent 
Lhe Flying Dutchmen off to an early 
lead, but the Bucknellians, with Foltz in 
the lead, tied the count at 8-all and 
forged ahead. The Bisons continued to 
dominate play and sported a 29-23 ad- 
vantage at half time. 

In the first two minutes of the second 
half Frey and Paul Billett counted from 
the field to cut the Bucknell margin to 
Lwo points. Bucknell came back to take 
a 33-29 lead, but two minutes later a 
pair of neat field goals by Raymie Frey 
gave L. V. C. the lead at 34-33. 

Midway in the second half the Val- 
leyites had increased their lead to 42- 
35, but the Bisons kept nibbling away 
at the L. V. C. advantage, advancing 
to within one point of the Flying Dutch- 
men at 47-46. With two minutes to go 
he Bucknell five deadlocked the count 
it 49-all. 

After the following center jump Clair 
Snell was fouled in the act of taking a 
long shot, the L. V. C. guard converting 
one of the two free tosses. The Buck- 
nellians made an unsuccessful assault on 
the Blue and White goal and when L. 
V. C. regained possession of the sphere 

(Continued on Page 3, Column 2) 



Debaters at Women's Club 



Last Friday afternoon the Inter- 
national Relations Club conducted a 
program for the local Women's Club. 
A debate was held between the girl's 
affirmative team and the men's nega- 
tive team on the subject, "Resolved: 
That Congress should be empowered 
to fix maximum hours and minimum 
wages in industry," The affirmative 
viewpoint was upheld by Hazel Hem- 
inway and Jean Harnisch while Carl 
Erhart and Charles Kinney defended 
the negative viewpoint. Members of 
the club were asked to judge the de- 
bate and by a slight margin favored 
the affirmative team. Calvin Spitler 
was chairman for the debate. This 
was the first of the International Re- 
lations Club's off-campus activities. 



p 



PAGE TWO 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 1937 



ESTABLISHED 1925 



A weekly publication by the Undergraduate Students of Lebanon Valley College 



EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 

Richard A. Baus, '37 



MANAGING EDITOR 

Edgar Messer&mith, '37 
ASSISTANT 
Boyd Shaffer, '38 



ASSOCIATE EDITORS 
William H. Earnest, '37 
Louis E. Straub, '37 



EDITORIAL BOARD 
SPORTS EDITOR FEATURE EDITOR 

William H. Earnest, '37 Louise Stoner, '38 

REPORTORIAL STAFF 

Mildred Gangwer, '39 Conservatory 

Duey Unger, '37 - Kalozetan 

Alice Richie, '39 - - Delphian 

Kenneth Eastland, '37 Philokosmiax 

Grace Naugle, '37 - , — „_Clionian 



Harold Beamesderfer, '37 
Karl Flocken, '37 
Eleanor Lynch, '37 
Harold Phillips, "'37 
Clifford Barnhart, '38 
Elizabeth Bender, '38 
Sylva Harclerode, '38 
Samuel Rutter, '39 

BUSINESS BOARD 
BUSINESS MANAGER CIRCULATION MANAGER 

Robert Kell, '37 Elwood Needy, '37 

ASSISTANT ASSISTANT 

Curvin Dellinger, '38 Ernest Weirick, '39 



Ernestine Jagnesak, '38 
Wanda Price, '38 
Calvin Spitler, '38 
Theresa Stefan, '38 
William Clark, '39 
Thomas Guinivan, '39 
Robert Long, '39 



Single Copies 5 cents 

Subscription $1.00 per year 



Entered at the Annville, Pa., post office as second class matter, under the Act of 
March 3, 1879. 

Published weekly through the school year, except during holiday vacation and 
examination week. 



REPRESENTED FOH NATIONAL auvcmiISINO BY 

National Advertising Service, Inc. 

College Publishers Representative V 
420 Madison Avr New York. N. Y. 
Chicago • Boston . San fkanciico 
Cos ANaei.cs . Portland • scattlb 



Vol. XIII 



THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 1937 



No. 22 



AND THEN? 



At the completion of lour years of college, a great course of 
study is finished ,for some of us. For others, the years of study are 
just beginning. Many who have completed their formal education 
with a college degree find that they do not continue to study with- 
out a directed course. How can we as college students prepare to 
continue our study after graduation 

There is one unit of this institution which we find repeated in 
almost every community — the library. If we learn how to use the 
college library, we can study, with direction, in any place. We shall 
find many old friends in the library if we know just where to look 
for them. 

The first year students are required to spend some time during 
their English course in order to become acquainted with the college 
library. After the course has been completed, a few do not make 
use of this knowledge. Much of the work of the college is reference. 
When we graduate, all our study will be in the form of reference. 
No student should finish four years of college work without making 
use of the privilege of learning a little library science. This know- 
ledge can be used anywhere no matter how far one travels from his 
alma mater. 

AND THEN — 



On Monday we almost forgot whose two hundred and fifth 
birthday the nation was celebrating until we went to chapel. On 
leaving the service we instinctively looked towards the roof of the 
Administration Building where the flag pole is situated, expecting 
to see the Stars and Stripes wafting in the breeze. But no, there 
was no such emblem there. Ever since then we have been wondering 
whose business it is to see that the American Flag is raised on just 
such national holidays, and why no flag was in evidence on this par- 
ticular holiday. 



Washington s Birthday 
Observed in Chapel Talk 



Lebanon Valley College marked 
uniquely the anniversary of George 
Washington's birth on Monday morn- 
ing, when President Clyde A. Lynch in 
the chapel service read a number of ex- 
cerpts from Washington's speeches- 
These selections, from the famed Fare- 
well Address especially, were in addition 
to being appropriate to the occasion also 
timely in view of the most recent po- 
litical developments in our country. 

As an introduction Dr. Lynch read a 
portion from the Old Testament, illus- 



trating the point that the Hebrews were 
wont to ascribe all their national for- 
tunes to God. They regarded all the 
events of their history as directed by the 
hand of God. Likewise we must look 
on certain events as due to Almighty 
Providence, Dr. Lynch asserted. 

The life of Washington can be viewed 
as such a God-send to the infant Am- 
erican Republic. Furthermore, Wash- 
ington himself acknowledged the essen- 
tial role of God in human affairs. He 
emphasized that humanity cannot be 
moral without believing in a deity. 

Dr. Lynch proceeded to read several 
statements from Washington which evi- 
denced his remarkable foresight into 
constitutional crises. 



What They Say 

Question — Do you think that' the 
penalty for overeats in chapel at- 
tetulcunce recently specified by the 
faculty it too severe? 



JOHN NESS, Ffeshmm— No, 1 don't, 
oua.ething has to be done to keep the 
students in Chapel — so that's the best 
thing possible. 

* * » 

SARAH MacEWJSN, Sophomore— If 
the person has overcut only a few times, 
1 think it is decidedly too severe. After 
all, what does a chapel overcut matter? 
» # * 

RICHARD SMITH, Senior— I think 
it is entirely too authoritative and dic- 
tatorial. 

* # * 

JOHN BOLLMAN, Junior — I don't 
care — I never go, anyway." 

* * * 

HELEN BARTLETT, Sophomore— 
Yes; just think how long one would 
have to remain in college if he overcut 
often. 

* * • 

DANIEL SEIVERLING, Freshman 
—No, I don't think it is too severe. 
That's the only way you'll get some of 

them to go there. 

* ♦ # 

KARL FLOCKEN, Senior — A good 
atheist doesn't have a chance around 
here anymore. 

* # * 

LEANDER HAMM, Sophomore — 
They are using Fascist methods. 

* * * 

HOWARD PEFFLEY, Freshman— I 
think it is; 1 tlhink chapel attendance 
shouLd have no effect upon scholastic- 
work at all. 

* * » 

GEORGE YOKl'M, Sophomore— It's 
puritanical. Any compulsory action by 
the faculty is to be abhorred, especially 
along religious lines. 

* * # 

DOROTHY WENTLING, Sophomore 
— I don't think chapel attendance is 
worth making so much fuss. After all, 
if you don't want to go, you just sit 
there and read a book or something. 
Of course, you are in a religious atmos- 
phere. 

* » * 

WARREN STRICKLER, Junior- - 
Any student who goes here to classes 
daily should be able to go to chapel four 
times a week. Chapel hasn't hurt any- 
body yet — not that 1 have heard of. This 
is a reliigous institution; we must re- 
member that. 

* * * 

HAROLD BEAMESDERFER, Sen- 
ior — If they had worthwhile chapel pro- 
grams — no; but as it is— yes. It's not 
worth the time it takes up. 

» » # 

WILLIAM CLARK, Sophomore — 1 
not only think the penalty is far too se- 
vere, but, in addition, that any penalty 
inflicted upon the students for failure 
to attend chapel services can only have 
as an effect upon them morally an exact 
antithesis of that which is presumably 
intended. 

» * # 

W ILLIA M K A R N EST, Senior— Why 
doesn't the faculty have some penalty 
on their own cuts? It's a poor example! 



Notice, Alumni 



On Friday, March 15, at 6:15 p. m. 
the Philadelphia Lebanon Valley Club 
will hold a dinner meeting in the din- 
ing room of the North Broad Street 
Reading Station at Philadelphia. The 
purposes of the meeting are to elect 
officers, set a goal, and renew friend- 
ships of college (lays. All alumni 
within the Philadelphia vicinity are 
urged to be present. 



Pugh 76 Named Director 
Penn State Extension 

By action of the board of trustees, 
David B. Pugh, 'Hi, has been named di- 
rector of arts and science extension of 
Pennsylvania State College. He will con- 
tinue to serve also as supervisor of the 
undergraduate centers which are located 
at DuBois, Hazleton, Pottsville, and 
Lniontown. 

Students who completed one or more 
years of regular work in the centers 
during the first two years of their ex- 
istence have transferred with advanced 
standing to over forty colleges and uni- 
versities other than Penn State, Mr. 
Pugh reports. In all cases full transfer 
of credit was granted them for work 
done in the centers. 

One of the chief objectives of these 
centers is to prepare high school gradu- 
ates for entrance as sophomores or jun- 
iors at higher institutions of learning. 



WASHINGTON SUBJECT 

DR. SHENK'S TALK 



(Continued from page 1) 



country at that period. Being the' first 
president, it was necessary for him to 
establish precedents in matters of eti- 
quette, in dealing with foreign minis- 
ters, in his relations to the Senate, to 
the Supreme Court, and to the heads of 
the various departments. Dr. Shenk 
quoted from Washington's journal on 
his tour through New England and 
through the Southern States, as well as 
from the opinions of Enlish statesmen 
and historians. Though the war for 
freedom had been won, it was necessary 
for Washington again and again to as- 
sert our independence. 



President Lynch's Activities 

Feb. 22 — Dr. Lynch spoke at the First 
Methodist Church at Huntingdon 
under the auspices of the State 
Y. M. C. A. on "Problems of 
Youth." 

Feb. 23 — Addressed the Annville 
Reading Circle on George Wash- 
ington. 

Feb. 24 — Preached the Lenten sermon 
at the Philadelphia 2nd U. B. 
Church. 

Feb. 26 — Will broadcast from Station 
WKBO at 4:30 p. m. on "Mental 
Hygiene and the College Student." 

Feb. 28— a. m., Middletown U. B. 
Church, p. m-, Highspire U. B. 
Church. 



Campus 
Religious Activities 

The Life Work Recruit cl €u 
had a most active day on Sunday 
ruary 21, 1!)37, while parti e ip ati ' * e|) " 
services at the New Cumberland i- ^ 
Brethren Church. Ethel lioutz pr ^ 
at both the morning and evenin* 
ship services. In the mornino- ^ *° N 
Lucie Cook, accompanied at the • 
by Ruth Hershey, sang a very a z 1 
priate vocal solo; Paul Horn very^ 
pressively sermonized on the them P T' 



Sun. 



Supremacy of Christ. During the 
day School hour, Paul Horn and 
Houtz taught the lesson to the Yo 
Men's. Class and Young Ladies' Clan ^ 

■"*SS 

spectively. Louis Straub, speaker if u. 

j I. 1 the 
evening service, delivered a dissertati 
on Christian Fducation. Marianne J 
favored the evening congregation ^ 
inspiring cello solos. Anita Patschk 
was her accompanist. 

• • • 

On Sunday morning a second deputa 
tion travelled to Avon. This deputation 
was also present for the Sunday School 
service. During the lesson hour, p au i 
Slonacker instructed the Men's Bible 
Class; Edith Metzger, the Young Ladiei' 
Class. In the morning worship service 
Edith Metzger had charge; Paul Slo- 
nacker preached on the subject, A N ew 
Heart. Representing the Conservatory 
of Music, Philip Lester and Esther Wise 
contributed musical selections on the 

trombone and on the piano respectively, 
» # » 

Audrie Fox was the speaker at the 
student prayer meeting held on Wednes- 
day evening, February 17, 1937, in 
Philo Hall. Claire Adams conducted the 
service. 



The Life Work Recruit Organization 
hold a special meeting 011 Thursday 
evening in North Hall parlor. Special 
topics for discussion and musical selec- 
tions will be attractive and worthy fea- 
tures of this program that will merit 
everv member's utmost attention. 



Get Well! 



The many friends of Martha Faust 
and Greta Heiland will be interested 
to know that they are recovering 
from their operations and will soon 
resume their studies and other ac- 
tivities. La Vie wishes them both a 
most speedy recovery and will be gk 
to welcome them back. 




"J can't go home this week-end and go 
to the dance, too, on only four dollars. 

"Sure you can. Go home by telephone! 

• Rates are reduced on Long Dis- 
tance calls ALL DAY SUNDAY 
and after seven every nig* 1 *- 

THE BELL TELEPHONE COMPANY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



On 

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LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 1937 



PAGtl THREE 



Pet, 
* in 

Ppro. 
I itn. 

•Tie 
Sim. 
Eth ei 
'ouag 

'ttht 
nation 
Treo 
with 



Puts. 

nation 
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Bible 
adies' 
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Slo- 
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sation 



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t Joseph and Ursinus 
Qn F' na ' B-B*H Schedule 

1 1 e y Fi ve Fa vore< l Over 
Ursin- 115 And Muhlenburg; 
Joe Plans Indefinite 



banon Valley's varsity quintet is 
^ down the home stretch with but 



more games to be played on the 



way, three of these contests be- 
, ag ue scraps. 



'"tonight at 8 o'clock the Flying Dutch- 
face the Ursinus five on the Leb- 
' Iien High School court in a league 
afl0n e The Blue and White defeated the 

g ,c io-^i, in a contest at Collegeville 
gears, J" « 

r jj er this season and are favored to re- 
^ t the triumph in tonight's play. There 
5 be no preliminary game. 
1 Q n Saturday night the Metoxen drib- 
blers journey to Allentown to defend 
third P lace a S ainst tne Muhlenberg 
Mules. This is also a return game, the 
Valleyites having downed the Mules, 49- 
u earlier this season. 

Next Tuesday night the Blue and 
White passers will face one of the lead- 
ing teams in the East, the strong St. 
Joseph's College team. The game is to 
l, e played in Philadelphia, but no de- 
tails have been received at the local 
athletic office as to the time or place for 
the fray. There is a strong possibility 
that the game may be one-half of an 
Arena double-header, but nothing definite 
has been learned up "to this time. 

In the then two remaining games the 
Valleyites will oppose Albright at Leb- 
anon and Bucknell at Lewisburg, the 
local dribblers' already sporting a win 
over each of these quintets. 



Qrls Win First Game 
By Defeating Albright 

Lebanon Valley Girls' Basketball 
team defeated the Albright College team 
45-14 in a game played in the High 
School gym, Friday, Feb. 19. The Leb- 
anon Valley girls showed much improve- 
ment over last year's team, and through- 
out the game definite signals were used. 
Brilliant and fast teamwork enabled 
^ V. to pile up a score of 23-7 by the 
tim e the half was called. 

After being refreshed, the girls went 
m |o the second half Determined to main- 
ta 'n their lead, and when the final whis- 
tle blew the score was 45-14. Ernestine 
Jagnesak was high scorer with a total 
ot J 9 points, while Henry, the Albright 
^Main, rolled up 13 of their 14 tallies. 

he results of this game predict a good 
| eason for Lebanon Valley, although this 
' s th e first year Albright has partici- 
^ ed m inter-collegiate contests. Leb- 
Valley will be able to prove their 

CeJ When they play with Dickinson > 
ar Crest, Shippensburg, Susquehan- 

^ and Albright at the Basketball Play 

* t0 be held on this campus March 6. 

a team 1>raCt ^ Ce game Saturday afternoon 
o Ver „ of L. V. frosh and sophs took 
0nd bh 'PPensburg 54-20, and in a sec- 

Lebarf m<2 Played the score was 28 " 2 S— 
The°r Valley ' s sec ond win. 
e lln eup s for the Albright game: 

Lebanon Valley 
Krea^, G- F. T. 

Resale LF 

%ck c 1 IQ 

Hsrr 8 o 16 

S RG PtaU1 ° ° ° 
L <>ok lq 000 

000 

Albright 

SidtRp G - F - T - 

Cl >*f ey q Ca l )tai 'i 6 1 13 

Ssc 1 1 
J^Ug 

H es lq 000 

000 



Frosh Flash Fast Rally 
To Defeat Hbg. Catholic 

Lebanon Valley's Frosh flashed their 
most potent attack of the season to down 
Harrisburg Catholic High at Harrisburg 
last Thursday night in a thrilling con- 
test. Final score: 30-28. 

The Capital City lads held a substan- 
tial lead midway in the final period, but 
the L. V. C. lads came back strong to 
land a neat decision. 

Danny Seiverling was the offensive 
star for the Frosh with six snappy field 
goals for the Frosh, while every member 
of the L. V. C. quintet contributed to the 
speedy attack which netted them victory. 

Charlie Belmer played a nifty defens- 
ive game for the Valleyites, taking the 
ball off the H. C. H. S. bandboard time 
after time to start Lebanon Valley plays 
which desulted in valuable twin-count- 
ers. 

The summaries: 

L. V. C. Frosh 

G- F. 

Artz F, G 1 2 

Grimm F 2 2 

Whitman F, G 2 1 

Seiverling F 6 

Geesey C o 

Belmer C 1 I 

Kreiser G o 

Schaeffer G o 



Totals 12 

Harrisburg Catholic 
G- ] 

Ofak F o 

Sariano F .1 o 

Grubic F 3 

Miller C I 

Krovic G 5 

McCarthy G 2 

McMahon G o 

Totals n 

Score by periods : 

Frosh 4 8 

H. C. H. S 13 5 



30 

T. 
1 
o 

10 
2 

11 

4 
o 

28 



6 12—30 
5 5-28 



BUCKNELL BISONS FALL 

BEFORE L. V. C. ATTACK 



(Continued from page 1) 

Paul Billett split the cords on a long 
poke to bring the final figures to 52-49. 
The summaries: 

LEBANON VALLEY 



11. Billett f. 



Frey c. 
P. Bilk 



BUCKNELL U 



Sager f. 



Lane f 

Foltz c-f 7 

Summers c 

Filer g 

Smith g 



Totals 18 



L. V. C. 
Bucknell 



G. 


F. 


T. 


5 


1 


11 


3 





(i 


9 


1 


19 


3 


3 


9 


1 


1 


3 


2 





4 








23 


6 


52 


r. 

G. 


F. 


r. 


1 


3 


5 


2 





4 


1 





2 


7 


4 


18 





3 


3 





1 


1 


7 


2 


16 











18 


13 


49 


23 


29 


—52 



29 20—49 



WRITERS COMPLETE PLANS 
FOR LA VIE SUPPLEMENT 



(Continued from page 1) 



Club decided to keep the original ones. 
The best articles of each member were 
approved for publication and were to be 
submitted to La Vie editor the follow- 
ing morning in corrected form. 

It was interesting to have the hereto- 
fore unread writings presented. One 
member of the club had neglected to 
read a poem of his which had received 
unprecedented applause and the club de- 



INTERCLASS BASKETBALL STANDING 









Points 






Fouls 




Wm 


Lost 


For 


Against Goals 


Fouls 


MitfMd 






1" 


357 


244 


162 


33 


39 






3 


274 


309 


126 


22 


56 






3 


218 


204 


91 


36 


51 






6 


190 


282 


82 


26 


60 



Leading Scorers 



Miss 



Trego 7 

Kinney 5 

Foreman 4 

Peffley 7 

Capka 6 

Heisch 6 

Frey 6 

Gasteiger 6 

Munday 5 

Thomas 5 

Donmoyer 3 

Bachman 5 

Weidman 6 

Gongloff 6 

Dempsey 2 

Unger 6 



0. 


F. 


F. 


Tot. 


42 


8 


7 


92 


37 


17 


9 


9i 


33 


5 


8 


71 


31 


5 


11 


67 


28 


7 


8 


63 


26 


1 


3 


53 


22 


8 


5 


52 


21 


7 


16 


49 


19 


9 


7 


47 


21 


3 


15 


45 


18 


2 





38 


15 


2 


1 


32 


14 


1 


9 


29 


9 


8 


9 


26 


12 


1 


6 


25 


10 


1 


2 


21 



manded that it be produced. Despite the 
protest of the author, that same poem 
will be included in the supplement. 

When the discussion had ended, Mrs. 
Struble who had given helpful sugges- 
tions during the evening, served tea and 
chocolate cake in her own inimitable 
fashion. 

The club concluded the meeting with 
the decision that an announcement of in- 
vitation for new members should be 
made in the near future. The vacancies 
are: two seniors, one junior, one sopho- 
more, and two freshmen, one of whom 
must be a boy. Maxine Earley will 
make the announcement to the student 
body. 



DIPLOMAT DRIBBLERS 

TROUNCE VALLEYITES 



(Continued from page 1) 



Raymie Frey and Billett were cap- 
ably checked by the F. and M. defense, 
tallying but nine points combined. Ed 
Kress proved the offensive star for 
the losing Blue and White cause with 
twelve points on five field goals and two 
foul conversions. 

The loss was the fourth for Lebanon 
Valley in league competition, but the 
Metoxennien are still in third place in 
the league standings despite the defeat. 

The summaries: 

LEBANON VALLEY 



P. Billett f. 

Kress f 

R. Billett f. 

Frey c 

Aungst c 

Snell g 

Brown g 

Bachman g. 



Totals 



F. & M. 



Landers f 

Asplin f 

Snodgrass f 10 

Sponaugle c 

Yingst c 

Hummer g 

Reber g 

Martin g 

Totals 



G. 


F. 


T. 


2 


1 


5 


5 


2 


12 





2 


2 


1 


2 


4 











1 





2 




















9 


7 


25 


G. 


F. 


T. 





4 


4 


3 





6 


10 


2 


22 


8 





16 











1 


3 


5 


2 


1 


5 


1 





2 


25 


10 


60 



Seniors Victory Streak 
Is Snapped By Freshmen 



The mighty seniors entered the bas- 
ketball court on Monday night with the 
expectation of clinching the 1937 Inter- 
class League pennant. However, a scrap- 
py frosh outfit had different ideas and, 
led by sharpshooters Foreman and Pef- 
fley, rudely bumped off the near-grads. 
The score was 50-40. Much to the amaze- 
ment of all, the frosh had piled up a 17-1 
lead at quarter time. That was too good 
to last. Kinney and Trego found their 
lost prowess and sliced the lead con- 
siderably to 27-21 at half time. A wres- 
tling match featured that quarter. The 
second half was a scoring duel with Tre- 
go and Kinney trying desperately, but 
vainly, to outdo Foreman and Peffley. 
When the final score was tallied the se- 
niors' winning streak of six games came 
to a halt and they still needed one more 
victory to clinch the league title. The 
summary : 

Seniors 

G- F. T. 

Kinney F 8 2 18 

Trego F 7 14 

Lazin C 306 

Unger G o 

Straub G 000 

Loose G 102 

Totals 19 2 40 

Freshmen 

G- F. T. 

Foreman F 11 1 23 

Peffley F 8 o 16 

Munday C 237 

Moller G 1 o 2 

Lynch G 1 o 2 

Totals 23 4 50 

Seniors 21 19—40 

Freshmen 27 23 — 50 




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PAGE FOUR 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 1937 



Women Speakers Open 
Schedule Of Debates 



Heminway And Harnish Re- 
present Lebanon Valley 
Against Bucknell Univer- 
sity Team 

The women's debating association 
opened its season on Wednesday even- 
ing, February 17, with a non-decision 
debate in Delphian Hall. The Lebanon 
Valley affirmative team, consisting of 
Hazel Heminway and Jean Harnish, op- 
posed a negative team from Bucknell 
University, consisting of Margaret Parin 
and Maxine Askey- Dr. Stevenson acted 
as chairman. 

Both sides showed a clear understand- 
ing of the subject which they presented 
very well to one of the largest and most 
attentive audiences of students and fa- 
culty which has ever attended a campus 
debate. 

With the Bucknell group were Mr. and 
Mrs. Liebarger, coach and chaperon, 
Celia Marcus, and Lorena Kile. Lebanon 
Valley was one of three colleges which 
Bucknell included in a debating ' trip 
last week, the other two being Al- 
bright and Ursinus. 



Five Conserve Students 
Present Fine Recital 



Five Conservatory students were pre- 
sented in recital Tuesday evening at 
eight o'clock. They were: Virginia 
Niessner, mezzo-soprano; Beatrice Fink, 
soprano; Anita Patsehke and Ruth 
Goyne, pianists; John Zettleinoyer, vio- 
linist; and Robert Heckman, organist. 
THE PROGRAM: 

"My Love Is a Muleteer", by De No- 
gero; 'The Crying of Water", by Camp- 
bell-Tipton; and 1 '0 Heart of Mine", by 
Clough-Leighter — Virginia Niessner, 
Mezzo-Soprano. 

"The First Movement of Sonata, Op. 
10, No. 2", by Beethoven; 'Devilish In- 
spiration", by Prokofiew — Anita Fatsch- 
ke, Piano. 

"Romance Sans Paroles", by Var 
Goens; "Gavotte", by Kramer; "Danse 
Espagnole", by Kramer — John Zettle- 
moyer, Violin. 

"A Ballade in D. Minor", by Brahms; 
and "Air and Variations", by Pachelbel 
— Ruth Goyne, Piano. 

"Angels Ever Bright and Fair", by 
Handel— from oratorio, "Theodora"; 
"Valley of Laughter", by Sanderson; 
"U Boccio", by Ardite — Beatrice Fink, 
Soprano. 

"Kyrie Eleison" from Cathedral Wind- 
ows, by Karg-Elert — Robert Heckman, 
Organ. 

Accompanists — Ruth Buck, Robert 
Clippinger. 



JVeu) L. V. C. Catalogue Out 
Feu) Changes Made 



The new college catalogue is out. It 
made its official appearance on Tuesday. 
It is made up on the same pattern as 
those of previous years, with but two 
new items. One of these deals with 
chapel overcuts, which was explained at 
some length in the last issue of La Vie, 
while the other has reference to the re- 
moving of conditions. The following is 
the exact quotation from the catalogue: 
"Conditions must be removed during the 
semester following that in which the 
condition was incurred, unless the in- 
structor in charge recommends that the 
student become an auditor of the course 
when next given; In tin- latter case the 
condition must l>e removed when the 
course is next repeated. Failure to meet 
one or the other of these requirements 
converts the condition into a failure." 
Students will be gratified to learn that 
there is no advance in the tuition. 



Whee, the People 

Parker, our Winchester! Break out 
another case — of shells, boys, there's mu- 
tiny afoot! Did these dimming old eyes 
con a column titled The Brazen Head in 
the last issue of La Vik, or was that 
just our nervous indigestion? Tucked 
away (hidden, in fact) among the ads, 
there appeared this collection of literary 
mangelwurzel in which the author pro- 
claimed to the breezes that Villiann (re- 
member?) was fini. Not only was Vil- 
liann dead, he said, but Villiann was a 
foul fella. 

• 

Alors, may we inform the Brass Head 
and his hand-picked group of self-ap- 
pointed honorary pall-bearers that Vil- 
liann is still very much in evidence. On- 
ly yesterday we saw him setting a fledg- 
ling sparrow's broken leg and then 
climbing a very tall oak in order to 
return it to its nest. 

Your writer (a tall, red-haired, and 
cauliflower-eared man named Hassen- 
phieft'er, last seen loitering outside the 
Barbershop) is a disinterested observer 
ana professional innocent bystander who 
cannot stand seeing the rights of the 
proletariat abused. And Villiann was 
very proletariat. 

• 

It might perhaps be a good idea to 
make clear our stand on the Brass Head 
business before we swing the monkey- 
wrench to shoot some real steam through 
the literary pipes. Us, we prefer him 
well done! The caricature-charactei, 
"Shadow," puts it quite neatly: Brass 
Head is a pimty-waist! And a twerp! 
Or, shall we get personal? O. K., we'll 
get personal: the man is an utter ass, 
a veritable animated faux-pas. (We'd 
better make the most of this while it 
lasts; for he'll probably think of some 
cute names himself when he goes to bat 
next week.) 

• 

Brass Head says that Villiann was 
prejudiced, that his distribution of flor- 
al tribute — both raspberry and cacti- 
was too monotonously directed at the 
same people. And the Cultured Cuckoo 
uses an entire column in which to say 
this. Thus making himself appear to be 
no tyro in the prejudice racket, either. 
Prejudiced? Of course Villiann was 
prejudiced! Show us a man who can 
write a consistently unbiased column 
and you'll be faced with the prospect of 
seeing Diogenes not only throwing away 
his lantern, but setting fire to his tub 
and asking them to please pass the hem- 
lock. In plain English (with which Brass 
Head is not as yet on squeaking terms, 
the rat!): there ain't no such animal! 
• 

Brass Head appears to be a very in- 
flammable fella. Fine we say. Why, we 
haven't even begun to warm up. If he 
boils this easily, we could put fortli a 
bit of two-gun "prejudice" which would 
have his clothes off and his hair on fire 
in one minute and ten seconds flat. We 
always wanted to meet a guy like thai! 
• 

The Brass Cranium is your new col- 
umnist. You can have him. To us he is 
simply a succession of sound, fury, and 
alarms — a disjointed disciple of Roget. 
He signifies nothing. (Memo to Miss 
Glutz: Project to suggest use by Rand- 
MeNally of Brass Head's spine as a map 
of the Yellow River. Wow!) We want 
no part of him. 

• 

He is the sort of a fellow who is not 
concerned just as long as he can scribble 
his normal weekly quota of diatribes 
and have his daily siesta in the reverse 
order of importance. He also appears 
to be the type who knows when he is 
licked, if someone nudges him. So, after 
Brass Head has piped his feeble twitter 
and vented his pale spleen next week, 
we shall reach for an effect which will 
have him thinking tint something heavy 
and blunt had sloshed him between the 
ears at the exact moment when he was 
slipping on a banana peel. — "La!" 



Dr. Lynch Addresses 
State Y. M. C. A. Group 

Problems of Youth Discussed 
By State-Wide Organiza- 
tion at Juniata College 



At a meeting composed of ministers, 
members of the faculty of Juniata Col- 
lege, and representatives of the young 
peoples organiaztions of Huntington, Dr. 
Lynch outlined and elaborated upon the 
problems confronting modern youth. The 
meeting was presided over by President 
Ellis of Juniata College, and was held 
under the auspices of the State Y. M. 
C. A. Many prominent citizens also at- 
tended. 

The problems of youth as presented 
by Dr. Lynch fall under four general 
heads; orientation problems, emotional 
problems, personal problems, and the 
problem of exploitation. In connection 
with these subjects he referred to the 
extensive surveys made by the American 
Council on Education and the Fortune 
Magazine. 



PHILO PLANS ANNIVERSARY 
AT MEETING THIS WEEK 



{Continued from page 1) 



members decided in favor of a dinner- 
dance which will be held May 7. In the 
discussion many interesting angles were 
suggested by various members. The large 
number of members present was a good 
indication of their interest in Philo's 
activities. At the close of the meeting 
the committees for the 70th Anniver- 
sary were appointed. They are as fol- 
lows : 

DANCE: Robert Kell, John Trego, 
William Earnest, Jack Moller, Donald 
Worley. ORCHESTRA: Boyd Shaf- 
fer, Joseph Thomas, Pete Fridinger, 
Harry Criswell, David Foreman. PLAY : 
William Clark, Robert Tschop, Vernon 
Rogers. FAVORS : Woodrow Himmel- 
wright, Raymond Smith, Damon Silvers, 
Ben Goodman. RECEPTION: Roger 
Saylor, Dean Gasteiger, Howard Baier, 
Warren Secrist. TICKETS: Paul Ul- 
rich, Adolph Capka, Robert Grimm, 
John Lynch. 



FIFTEENTH ANNIVERSARY 
OBSERVED BY DELPHIANS 



(Continued from page 1) 



gold served as favors for the men. The 
programs, also of brown suede, harmon- 
ized with the favors. 

The receiving line which greeted the 
guests on their arrival was comprised of 
President and Mrs. Clyde A. Lynch, Dr. 
and Mrs. Derickson, Miss Gillespie, Mrs. 
Green, Dr. Lietzau, Dr. and Mrs. Richie 
and Prof, and Mrs. Stokes. Miss Ro- 
maine Stiles, the anniversary president, 
and Miss Cordelia Sheaft'er, the presi- 
dent for the second semester, represent- 
ed their society. Delphian provided 
pieasing entertainment for the chaper- 
ons and guests who did not care to 
dance. 

The Harrisonians, in their own able 
manner, supplied the music for the 
dancers. 



PEGGY'S BEAUTY 
SHOP 

Special on Frederick Permanent 
Waves 

$4.00 $6.00 

2 blocks West on Sheridan Avenue 



KEYSTONE 
Gleaners and Dyers 

Hats Cleaned and Reblocked 

One Pressing Service 
10 W. Main St., ANNVILLE, PA. 



The New Books 

Nowadays we are all compelled to 
think about economic and financial prob- 
lems. They are constantly discussed in 
newspapers, over the radio, and, more 
personally in private conversations. In 
order to participate more intelligently 
we ought to know something about the 
different economic theories we hear ad- 
vocated. Dr. Erich Roll, who is head 
of the Department of Economics in the 
University College of Hull, has written 
About Money, for the serious person who 
wishes to qualify himself for criticising 
modern theories of money. It is a book 
written in non-technical language for the 
layman. Dr. Roll does not put forward 
any one theory for our acceptance^ but 
leads us gradually through simple ex- 
position of the accepted facts, to the 
point at which economics touches the: 
domain of social and political ideals — the 
point at which the interests of all of us 
are engaged. And this is also a book for 
the student, who will gain from it, at an 
early stage, a grasp of the important 
problems of money, and the more im- 
portant theories about it. 

Those with a scientific bent will want 
to read The Theory of the Gene, by the 
eminent geneticist, Morgan. Since the 
time of Mendel no one has made more 
important - additions to our knowledge 
of heredity than Professor Morgan. The 
volume recently added to the library is 
based on the Silliman Lectures delivered 
at Yale University. It presents a clear 
account of the Science of Genetics. The 
first edition, of which this is a revision 
and enlargement, was selected by the 
American Library Association as one of 
the forty notable American books pub- 
lished in 1026. 

Science and religion are of eternal in- 
terest. There have been many attempts 
at a synthesis of the two, and here is a : 
new one by a physician. Dr. N. Bishop 
Harman, Fellow of the Royal College 
of Surgeons of England, frankly discus- 
ses the relations of science and religion 
with a critical eye for the good and evil 
of each side. A scientifically trained man, 
he naturally gives aid and comfort to 
no superstition anywhere, and yet he 
finds true religion valid in such questions 
as those of prayer, sin and immortality. 
Aside from the importance of theme and 
the clearness and force of its presenta- 
tion the book is a delightful piece of 
reading from the literary standpoint. Dr. 
Harman is a wide reader and has gath- 
ered quotations from the rich resources 
of a lifetime of understanding leading. 



Sip a Soda 



at 



DiehFs Drug Store 

Why not take advantage of the many 
services we offer. 



RENU SHOP 

One Day Service 
Dry Cleaning, Pressing, Repairing 
11 E. Main St. ANNVILLE, PA. 




D.L. SAYLOR $ 
SONS 

Contractors 

Lumber and Coal 

ANNVILLE, PENNA 



KREAMER BROS. 

Furniture 
Floor Coverings 
Electric Refrigerators 
Hoover Electric Sweepers 
Electric Washing Machines 

RCA Radios 
FUNERAL .DIRECTORS 
Phone 144 ANNVILLE, p A 



John Hirsh Dept. Sforc 

Men's Leather and Wool Jackets 
Wool Mackinaws 
Weyenberg Shoes 
Phone 145 9-11 W. Main St 

ANNVILLE, PA. 



For School Supplies and 
Books of all Kinds Go To- 

BOLLMAN'S 

628 Cumberland Street 
LEBANON, PA. 



Meals Served Daily 

Best Sundaes in Town with 
Home Made Ice Cream 
Sandwiches, Cigarettes, Cindy 

C. D. BRUNNER 

E. Main St. ANNVILLE, PA. 



Complete Your Food 
Supply For That Midnight 
Lunch By Stopping At 

FINK'S BAKERY 



We sell all types of baked products 
at all hours. 



|No College Man Can Afford 
jTo Disregard HU ApP<» r ' 
I ance. 

j "Make it a Rule to Visit Us 
Once a Week" 



KARL'S SHOP 

I Corner Main and White Oak j 
I ^00** 



'Start the day 

In the Modern way. 

Breakfast at the PennvW 



THE PENNWAY HOlf* 



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Welcome Mothers j 
and Co-eds j 

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Green Blotter 
Supplement 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



VOL. 



xiii 



ANNVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA, THURSDAY, MARCH 4, 1937 



Girls To Entertain 
Mothers This Week-end 

B IG PROGRAM PLANNED 

play D a y> Banquet, Tea, Var- 
sity Game Scheduled For 
parents 

r^e annual Mother's Week-End has 
come again and it promises to be more 
j; ve ly and entertaining than ever before. 

very full program has been prepared 
to show the mothers what their daugh- 
ters do at college. Those girls who have 
n0 mothers have been invited to borrow 
one for the occasion so that everybody 
may share in the fun. 

Despite the lofty precedent set this 
year by the sons on Dad's Day, the girls 
are confident that their mothers will en- 
joy as splendid a week-end. 

The program will be set into action 
Friday evening when the Clionian girls 
will present entertainment during the 
evening in Clio Hall for those mothers 
who have arrived. This program will 
begin at 7:30 P. M. The mothers will 
then be allowed until 10:00 Saturday to 
catch their breath and get their bear- 
ings in the geography of the campus. 

Saturday will be "Play Day," a new 
plan adopted by Miss Henderson for 
promoting fellowship among the girls 
on this campus with those from other 
colleges. Girls will arrive from Cedar 
Crest, Dickimson, Albright, Shippens- 
burg, and Susquehanna to compete in 
the games during the day. 

Since mother now has entered college 
life, she will be escorted to a basketball 
game at 10 o'clock in the college gym. 
At noon on Saturday there will be a 
banquet in the dining room given by the 
Women's Athletic Association of the 

{Continued on Page 2, Column 5) 



Program and Itinerary 
of Men's Band Planned 



N °velty Selections, Marches, 
Modern Numbers, and 
Familiar Melodies in Pro- 
gram 



rofessor Rutledge has recently made 
{o ° W " a Partial program and itinerary 
th r th e men's band of L. V. C. during 

4m° ming SCaSOn ' The band ' whIch waS 
isi n Cnte< ? this year by some very P rom " 
sent! n mUS5danS ' gives indication of P re " 
Inclu a finCr program than €ver before - 
"Tan V. tbe f°'l owul g selections : 

nnauser Overture" by Richard 
e Ver inis overture contains the 

Ch " r ^, Ular and beloved "Pilgrim's 
is «rj S ^ or a modern number there 
^hich^ Pur P le " by Peter DeRose, 
rhyt hmic h faVOred by having a strong 
n «W h"? background in addition to those 

^inisk g harmonies - 
^ssian y ~ Korsakoff , the outstanding 
Promj nen C ° mp0se r of his time, is given a 
gr ° u P o" , ? lace on tlle program with -a 
are the i familiar melodies. Included 
"H yrnn ^ ell -knovvn "Song of India" and 

C °cker e i» ^ Sun " from the " Golden 

° Scar St^ stirrin & march we have 
C Vol at ' ra c Us ' "My Hero" from "The 
a ie Soldier." 
n °veltv t 

((? iy tor the band will be the 
°"*-d on Page 7j Colymn 6) 



No. 23 



Dr. Howe Visits Campus 
Confers With Students 

GUEST- AT BANQUET 

Speaks On Four Benefits Of 
True Religion In Monday 
Chapel 



The college was privileged to enter- 
tain on its campus last Monday a rep- 
resentative of the Bonebrake United 
Brethren Seminary in the person of Dr. 
J. Ruskin Howe, professor of system- 
atic theology in that institution. Dr. 
Howe visited this campus for the pur- 
pose of interesting the students in the 
seminary. On Sunday evening he deliv- 
ered to the local congregation in the 
College Church an address on the sub- 
ject, Religion Facing Life. Appearing 
in chapel service on Monday morning, 
Dr. Howe spoke briefly on The Religion 
of the future, in which he very fervently 
emphasized the necessity of two major 
qualities in religion — intellectual integ- 
rity and evangelized experience. These 
two qualities he said to be paramount 
and inseparable in true vital religion. 

(Continued on Page 8, Column 2) 



Women Debaters Fill 
Vigorous Schedule 

MEET THREE OPONENTS 



W. Maryland, Gettysburg, 
Bucknell Meet Teams In 
Non-Decision Contests 



The women's debating team had a full 
week of activity during last week. The 
negative team visited Western Maryland 
College on Tuesday night, February 23, 
and Gettysburg College on Wednesday 
night. Belle Mulhollen ond Theresa Ste- 
fan debated at both colleges on the trip. 
Both debates were non-decision. Agnes 
Morris, alternate, Margaret Holbrook, 
assistant manager, and Eleanor Engle 
accompanied the girls. 

Gettysburg College sent a negative 
team consisting of Marianne Hultberg, 
Margaret Dolam, and Elizabeth Lutz to 
Lebanon Valley to debate on Wednes- 
day night, February 24. Professor 
Warthen, coach of debate at Gettysburg 
accompanied the girls. Lebanon Valley 
upheld the affirmative side of the debate, 
the speakers being Louise Saylor and 
(Continued on Page 7, Column 3) 



Women Debate Tonight 

TOnight the negative team of the 
Women's Debating Association will 
speak for the first time on the Leba- 
non Valley campus. The speakers are 
Belle Mulhollen and Theresa Stefan, 
both day-student women. Their op- 
ponents will be an affirmative team 
from Ursinus College. The debate, a 
non-decision one, ^ ill begin at 7:45 
in Delphian Hall. 



iVeo) features Included 
In Summer School Plans 



Prof. M. L. Stokes in an interview 
stated recently that the program for 
Summer School this year has several 
new features. 

The summer extension courses in Har- 
risburg will be held in the evening for 
the first time this year. J. Edward Hil- 
ler, '33, who is teaching in the Edison 
Junior High School, has been appointed 
the Lebanon Valley representative to or- 
ganize this work in Harrisburg. 

In Annville three or four courses will 
be offered for those graduates who are 
now preaching but for some reason or 
other found it impossible to attend the 
United Brethren Seminary". One of these 
courses will be offered by President C. A. 
Lynch. 

The Demonstration Practu._ x caching 
School which was held at Hershey last 
summer will be continued this year. 
There is an opportunity for approximate- 
ly twenty students to do their student 
teaching at this time. Already nearly 
fifteen students of this and other col- 
leges have stated their intention to teach 
at Hershey this summer. 

In addition to these features, many of 
the usual curricular courses will be of- 
fered. 

The Summer Siihool folders are now 
ready for mailing, and the official bul- 
letin will be out in a few weeks. 



Students See How 

Glass Is Made 



Last Thursday, in an extended 
chapel period, the students got a 
glimpse into the manufacture of op- 
tical glass and instruments and their 
preparation for market. Mr. L. P. 
Clements operated the films furnished 
by Bausch and Lomb, the only man- 
ufacturers of glass for all optical 
purposes. 



Debating Teams Tour This Season 



For the first time in recent years the 
debating teams at Lebanon Valley are 
going on tour this season. The "South- 
ern trip" of the men's affirmative, taken 
last Thursday and Friday to Washing- 
ton College and Western Maryland 
College respectively was the first of this 
extended series of journeys to neighbor- 
in schools. 

At Washington College, Curvin Thomp- 
son of the I, V. C. affimative made his 
debut as a debater in a non-decision 
wrangle conducted on the old Oxford 
plan. He was opposed by Smith of the 
Washington negative, while his col- 
league, Clark, attacked the other Wash- 



ington representative, Razin. Observers 
declared that Lebanon Valley presented 
weak constructive speeches, although 
their rebuttal was noticeably stronger. 
Both speakers attributed this condition 
to the fact that they were able to speak 
extempore only in the rebuttal, and had 
had difficulty in fitting their ''canned" 
constructive speeches into the debate as 
presented by Washington. 

At Western Maryland, the debate was 
held before the Westminster High School 
on the Oregon plan. An audience deci- 
sion gave the palm to Western Mary- 
land, although there were an appreciable 

(Continued on Page 2, Column 5) 



Co-Eds From Five Colleges 
To Be Entertained By WAA 

PLAY DAY TO BE INAUGURATED HERE SATURDAY 

Susquehanna, Cedar Crest, Dickinson, Shippensburg, Al- 
bright Women To Participate In Basketball Tournament; 
Discussions To Follow Games 



The Women's Athletic Association is sponsoring a Basketball 
Play Day as a feature of Mother's Week-End. Five schools have 
accepted an invitation to participate in this event, the first of its kind 
to be held and undertaken on this campus. The W. A. A. hopes to 
make this Play Day as successful and worthwhile as the one in 
which Lebanon Valley participated at Susquehanna last fall. 
Coaches and players from Susquehanna, Cedar Crest, Dickinson, 
Shippensburg and Albright will be present next Saturday. 

The idea of Play Day is new. but is rapidly being accepted and 
enthusiastically undertaken by all the better high schools and col- 
leges. There i s a trend in women's athletics to do away with intense 

varsity competition, and by means of a 
Play Day, to foster a spirit of friend- 
ship and fellowship between schools. 
Girls and coaches from numerous schools 
: eet one another, new ideas and tech- 
niques are discussed, coaches and play- 
ers submit problems which the entire 
group tries to solve, short games are 
played and discussed critically, and help- 
ful hints are given. Those are the pur- 
po es of Flay Day, and in their first en- 
deavor of this sort, the W. A. A., under 
the leadership of the women's coach, 
Miss Henderson, has prepared a full and 
varied program for the day. 

At 10 o'clock Saturday morning the 
activity for the day will begin. At that 
time there will be three short games, 
he opponents in these games being de- 
termined by lot. There will also be three 
full period games. The teams will be 
placed according to ability, but the list 
of competitors will not be posted until 
Saturday before the games. After the 
three short games there will be a dis- 
cussion led by the captains of each 
team. "Pre ent Rules" will be the topic 
of discussion. The coaches will not con- 
trbiute to this discussion, but by this, it 
is hoped to break the ice and to have 
the players present their ideas. At 11:15 
the steak dinner will be served in the 
college dining hall. 

At 1:30 all the players will be shown 
movies on "Basketball Technique." The 
movies will be shown in the chapel. At 
2:30 and at 3:30 the last two games will 
be played. Then, as a climax to the day, 
there will be a social hour to which all 
are invited. 

Miss Moyer and Miss Gollam, both 
National officials, will referee the games. 
(Continued on Page 7, Column 5) 



Kalozeteans Shape Plans 
For Sixtieth Anniversary 

Kappa Lambda Sigma's Sixtieth An- 
niversary Dance promises to be the big- 
gest and best that the society has ever 
held. At a meeting of the society this 
Monday the orchestra that has been con- 
tracted for the dance was announced and 
the band which is to provide the music 
is Al Shirey of York. This orchestra has 
had engagements at the University of 
Maryland, Western Maryland, Gettys- 
burg, Franklin and Marshall, Dickinson 
and at many of the large dance halls in 
this section. The best obtainable in the 
line of music is assured for the evening's 
dancing. 

The favor committee has interviewed 
representatives during the past week and 
has selected and contracted for a very 
(Continued on Page 7, Column 5) 



Metoxen Court Quintet 
Downed By St. Joseph's 

Captain Paul Billet Leads Blue 
And White Attack In Philly 
Battle 



St. Joe's speedy quintet took the meas- 
ure of the Blue and White five Tuesday 
night at Philadelphia by a 46-38 count 
in a cleanly-played and hard-fought court 
contest. 

Jumping away to a 21-8 lead during 
the opening minutes of the fray, the 
Hawks were never headed by the Flying 
Dutchmen, but twice the Metoxenmen 
rallied to deadlock the count and keep 
the issue in doubt until the waning mo- 
ments of action. 

At the half-time intermission the Blue 
and White forces were trailing their 
foes by but two points at 25-23 as the 
Valleyites staged a spirited rally during 
the latter minutes of the opening half. 
At the start of the closing session the 
Hawks again spurted into the lead, but 
the Flying Dutchmen deadlocked the 
count at 36-all and again at 38-all with 
but three minutes of play remaining. The 
St. Joe speedsters assumed a four point 
lead with a minute and a half to go and 
increased this edge on two-pointers by 
Smale and Oakes in the final seconds. 

Matt Guokas, one of the best centers 

(Continued on Page 8, Column 4) 



Nominees For Y. M. C. A. 
Cabinet Formally Chosen 

A list of the nominations for the of- 
fices of the Y. M. C. A. staff for the 
coming year has been drawn up by a 
nominating committee composed of all 
the senior members on the present staff. 
The election will be held immediately af- 
ter the Easter recess. The new presi- 
dent will appoint the various cabinet 
chairmen, and the entire group will be 
formally installed by the president of 
the college two weeks later. The first 
major project to require their combined 
(Continued on Page 7, Column 3) 



PAGE TWO 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 4, 1937 



ESTABLISHED 1925 



A weakly publication by the Undergraduate Students of Lebanon Valley College 



EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 

Richard A. Baus, '37 



MANAGING EDITOR 

Edgar Messersmith, '37 
ASSISTANT 

Boyd Shaffer, '38 



ASSOCIATE EDITORS 

William H. Earnest, '37 
Louis E. Straub, '37 



EDITORIAL BOARD 
SPORTS EDITOR FEATURE EDITOR 

William H. Earnest, '37 Louise Stoner, '38 

REPORTORIAL STAFF 

Robert Clippinger, '39 Conservatory 

Duey Unger, '37 Kai.ozf.tan- 

Alice Richie, '39 Delphian 

Kenneth Eastland, '37 Philokosmiax 

Grace Naugle, '37 - _...Clionian 

Harold Beamesderfer, '37 Ernestine Jagnesak, '38 

Karl Flocken, '37 Wanda Price, '38 

Eleanor Lynch, '37 Calvin Spitler, '38 

Harold Phillips, '37 Theresa Stefan, '38 

Clifford Barnhart, '38 William Clark, '39 

Elizabeth Bender, '38 Thomas Guinivan, '39 

Sylva Harclerode, '38 Robert Long, '39 

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Vol. XIII 



THURSDAY, MARCH 4, 1937 



No. 23 



THE SUPPLEMENT 



It is with much pleasure that we present with this issue a copy of The Green 
Blotter. La Vie, though it has consistently called for literary work, has not pub- 
lished any great amount of creative material, due probably to the modesty of the 
authors on the campus. But with the establishment of The Green Blotter Club 
this handicap has been overcome. 

This supplement includes some piece from each member of the club and covers 
a multitude of subjects which we hope you will find entertaining. It presents an 
excellent cross section of a Green Blotter Club meeting showing the diversity of 
material read and also gives an insight into present collegiate literary activities. 

Literary activity on the campus should be stimulated, and it was for that pur- 
pose that we are printing this supplement. And to those who have made this pos- 
sible and who are carrying on this work, we extend our sincerest congratulations. 



PLAY DAY 



Ever since the formation of a Lebanon Valley chapter of the Women's Ath- 
letic Association a little over a year ago, the women here have accomplished more 
in fostering friendship and fellowship with the women of other campuses than 
ever before. 

This modern trend in women's athletics has as its ultimate purpose a migra- 
1 tion from a more extensive varsity competition to a more extensive development of 
women's athletics. 

To further this purpose, "play days" were inaugurated on college campuses. 
Women and coaches from other colleges gather together at a specified college 
where new ideas and techniques can be discussed. Both coaches and players sub- 
mit problems, short games are played and then discussed critically. 

This week-end Lebanon Valley will be hosts to co-eds and coaches from live 
colleges from this immediate vicinity. A full day of vigorous activity coupled 
with round table discussions has been planned by Lebanon Valley's Women's Ath- 
letic Association. 

The inauguration of Play Day on this campus is another step forward for 
I.ebanon Valley College. 



ANENT CULTURE 



A few days ago the men's day student room and the college at large witnessed 
another tea-party. The Freshmen received proper edification, the upper-classmen 
found an outlet for their pent-up repressions, and everyone claimed he had a 
good time. 

The sage seniors, with many sad shakes of the head, dwelt mournfully on the 
glories of tea-parties that are past, and declared that this is not like "the good old 
times." 

The aftermath of this tea-party was the action taken by the Men's Senate ii 
its Tuesday meeting when it formally decided to recognize the Men's Day Student 
Council no longer as the governing body of that group. 

The Senate is altogether justified in this move. The Day Student Council never 
did function since its organization at the beginning of the firsl semester. The for- 
mation of this separate governing body (under supervision of the Men's Senate) 
was merely the "brain child," we suspect, of a group who wanted to see another 



Managers of Lebanon Valley Debate Teams 





GRACE NAUGLE CHARLES KINNEY 

Managers of the Women's and Men's Debate Teams who have planned 
for them a most vigorous schedule for the 1937 season. Grace has had 
plenty of experience with debating, having been on the team for the past 
three years and in the capacity of assistant manager during her sophomore 
and junior years. Kinney, although he became active in debating only last 
year, is making up for lost time this season. He is not only manager of the 
Men's Debating Association but also a member of the negative team as 
well. Extensive tours have been planned by both managers for their 
several teams. 



activity listed under their picture in the 
college annual. 

One of the avowed purposes of the 
Council was to control conduct and im- 
prove the general conditions of day stu- 
dent quarters. 

Conduct could not be regulated. Con- 
ditions, the Administration promised, 
would be improved just as soon as the 
students demonstrated that they were 
prepared for them. The students reason 
contrariwise — improve conditions, trans- 
plant the day student into delightful 
quarters and he will instinctively be- 
have just as any other gentleman should 
behave. The administration and the stu- 
dents are at cross purposes. As a result 
we still have the tea-parties at regular 
intervals and the daily floor shows which 
consist of seeing who can scatter the 
most paper, fixtures, and remains of 
lunches over the greatest area of floor 
pace. 

The recent tea-party, which resulted 
in the dissolution of the Day Student 
Council, was merely a lesson on: "The 
proper care and treatment of day stu- 
dent quarters" administered to the new 
generation so that the traditional tea- 
parties may be perpetuated. 

We suggest that the commuters solve 
this problem individually. The reform 
must come from within. No amount of 
policing or secret service will make gen- 
tlemen out of a bunch of louts. As soon 
as such a transformation takes place, 
then the day students have the right to 
demand that the Administration provide 
adequate and more attractive quarters. 



CONSERVE DOINGS 



berman Cluh and I. R. C. 
View Mocing Pictures 



At the program sponsored by the 
Lebanon County Mental Health Clinic 
over station WKBO at 4:15 on last Fri- 
day afternoon, Jean Marbarger preced- 
ed Dr. Lynch's address by singing Sal- 
ter's "Last Night I Heard the Night- 
ingale." Following the address Miss 
Marbarger presented another selection 
entitled, "Come Down Laughing Stream- 
let," by Spross. 

* * * 

The following students will accompany 
Dr. Lynch to the Philadelphia Alumni 
Club banquet on March 5, presenting 
dinner music and a program after the 
banquet: Dorothy Zeiters, cellist; John 
Zettlemoyer, violinist; Ruth Goyne, pi- 
anist; Donald Worley, tenor; and Sara 
Light, who will accompany Mr. Worlev. 



the typical American by the Europeans. 

In answer to John Walmer's question : 
"Are the German people in back of Hit- 
ler or is he only in front of them?", Mr. 
Warfel said that it was his impression 
that they were in back of him and that 
if they did not stick together they would 
lose their identity as a nation. He point- 
ed out that the. Germans neither possess 
nor look for the privileges which are 
found in America. 

The International Relations Club met 
at the same time and viewed the pictures 
with th» German Club. Following the 
pictures, Dr. Black spoke on maximum 
hours and minimum wages. After a short 
period of informal discusrion, the meet- 
ing was adjourned. 



Motion pictures taken by D. S. Warfel 
of Lancaster while travelling through 
Europe in the summer of 1934 were 
shown at the Tuesday night meeting of 
the German club. More than thirty per- 
sons were present to see the pictures. 
The scenes were taken in France, Eng- 
land, Switzerland, and Germany. Some 
of the more interesting scenes were the 
Hindenburg funeral in Berlin and a 
panorama view of Paris from the Eiffel 
tower- Mr. Warfel explained the signi- 
ficance of the various views. In answer- 
ing questions from the group, he stated 
that while travelling through Europe *he 
formed the personal impression that the 
American traveller, with a self-satis- 
fied air, was not typical of America. He 
stated that they thought most of these 
braggadocio type of Americans were not 
accepted in the same manner in which 
they viewed themselves. They are ac- 
cepted, more or less, as a joke. He felt 
that Colonel Lindbergh was accepted as 



L. V. World Fellowship 
Pledges Near $200 hoaL 



The World Fellowship Committee of 
the Y. M. C. A. reports very favorable 
progress with its project of soliciting 
funds for the African student missionary 
undertaking. The goal was set at $200. 
Pledges and appropriations have already 
approached this mark more than half 
way. With the cooperation of every 
student the Committee will be able to re- 
port success for their work. Curvin 
Thompson, Chairman, has his commit- 
tees well organized and is planning an 
"every student" campaign. This work will 
be completed by the middle of the month. 
Lebanon Valley is one of five United 
Brethren Colleges engaged in his work 
and by realizing its goal, shall be privi- 
leged to select a student missionary next 
year from this campus. In the light of 
this fact, the project merits the support 
of every faculty member, student, and 
friend of the college. 



Religious Activities 

During the past few weeks the u 
Work Recruits have become increas ; ^ 



active. Daniel Shearer, chairman 
deputation committee, has given 



Of 



lri eiv 

the 



deal of time in arranging f or Se ^. 41 
in various churches throughout the 
conferences of the United Breth " 
Church. eD 
On Sunday afternoon a group l e fj. ^ 
te city of York, in the I J ennsylv an j f 



the city 

Conference, to conduct services » 



hirst United Brethren Church, of 



the 



w hich 



v. Paul E. V. Shannon, a trust ee 
banon Valley, is pastor. In the n 



Rev, 

Lebanon Valley, is pastor. In the Chy 

tian Endeavor service which np» n ,' S 

preceded 

the evening worship, Curvin Thonip s 
was in charge. John Miller presented" 11 
piano solo. Elwood Needy directed 



the 
Musical 



'Pp. 



evening service. As special 
numbers, Phillip Lester, Rose Tschn 
and Edna Binkeley were outstanding f 
their fine performances. Daniel Shea 
challenged the congregation with the 
thought of "Living Creatively," a Sub 
ject based on one of the principles of 
Christ's Sermon on the Mount. 

• « * 

A second deputation motored to th 
town of Birdsboro, Pa., to conduct se r 
vices in the U. B. Church of which Hev 
M. K. Schell is pastor. Elnora Reeder 
and James Ralston contributed musical 
numbers. Claire Adams presided over 
tlie service which was prepared for the 
observance of Young People's Day. 
Howard Peffley was the speaker of the 
evening. In his sermon, "Realizing God" 
he emphasized the fact that we must 
realize God as the fundamental reality 
of our lives. Alice Richie chauffeured 
the group. 



GIRLS TO ENTERTAIN 

MOTHERS THIS WEEK-END 



(Continued from pag$ 1) 



campus to honor their guests. More bas- 
ketball games by the girls will be played 
in the afternoon, so if mother should 
like a change, she will be taken to the 
Biology lecture room where Dr. Derick- 
son will show movies explaining the 
game. 

Then at dinner in the evening, a mu- 
sical program in charge of Agnes Mor- 
ris will be presented to soothe mother 
after the excitement of the day. Later 
in the evening, since mother now under- 
stands the rudiments of basketball, there 
will be am exciting game in Lebanon be- 
tween the boys of L. V. C. and Albright 
College. 

Before dinner at noon on Sunday, 
mother will be given a rose by the 
Freshman Y. W. C. A. cabinet as a re- 
membrance of her visit and she will then 
partake of a delicious meal in the din 
ing hall, decorated for the occasion. 

Until 2 o'clock Sunday, each mother 
will be given time to amuse herself rea 
ing the Green Blotter Supplement whic 
is printed with the La Vie this week- 

From 2 until 5 o'clock tea will 
served for all the mothers in North 
parlor. This will give the m ° theT ^ e 
chance to see the mothers they 
met, and to meet the new mothers 
have come. 



DEBATING TEAMS 



FOR THIS S 



EASO* 



(Continued from page *) 

number who favored Lebanon ^ jt 
presentation of the case, esp eC f 
i§ suspected, on account o 1 ^t- 
Thompson's ready witticisms. gjp 
ern Maryland negative, Tyr e11 • cfj fi- 
hardt, however, proved a smo 
bination. ^ofoT 
On Monday night, Clark an< ^ 
son lost again, this time, to up- 
town, at Elizabethtown. They ^ $e 
soling themselves by claiming ^ & 

affirmative is the toughest si 

are 8 ' 

question in this conservative 



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GREEN BLOTTER 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 4, 1937 



No. 2 



MOODY 



STUDY 



By Cynthia Fishbowl 

zure tints of drows y midni s ht 

A blue deepening into dark, drifting 
. of muttering, threatening 
Fleecy, darkening wisps ot 
gray black sheep in a sky meadow of 
'owly awakening tension. Rolling 
clouds in the glowering deep of a 
didactic smoke green approach of a 
hiding storm- Magnificent crack of 
hea vcn upon swirling jagged zig-zag 
{ streaked flash. Smashing onset of 
sharply painted raindrops earth- 
bound. Crash and pebbly tinkle of 
many -sided hailstones. Slow rumble 
f retreating menace and calm heat of 
drops falling steeply with precision 
on the world of earth. Sweet, slow 
breeze of renewed freshness from the 
storm. Spicy pungent smell of slimy 
w et leaves daintily swishing, dripping. 
Heightening of pink-yellow tint in the 
eastern depth of dark obscure eternity. 
Slow awakening of living things, so 
breathlessly expectant of coming day. 

Morning is dawning. Life like the 
storm with its hidden menaces, its 
tremulous queries, and its tremendous 
highroads is about to resume. 



Orla 

By Charon 



A Reverie 

By Weltanschauer 



J^ONG, arm-like branches of tall Doug- 
las Firs and Yellow Pines swayed 
gracefully in the cool breeze, their foli- 
age rustling with a rushing sound like 
the roar of Yosemite Falls. The thin, 
flat leaves of the Quaking Aspens whis- 
pered in reply to the needles of their 
coniferous neighbors. Speeding down the 
narrow valley towards Yuba Pass, icy 
waters of the mountain stream rippled 
over the smooth rocks and gaily whirled 
ln deep, mirror-like pools; the giant 
trees admired their stately reflections in 
the sheets of emerald-colored water. 
Nothing with milk-white foam, the rac- 
{Continued on Page 4, Column 1) 



JT was the time for cleaning the little 
cliff home, not really cleaning but the 
rearrangement of all Orla's treasures. 
The great green jar that stood by the 
wall, so that the last rays of the sun 
might send their beauty upon the colors, 
must be moved here — no there — at any 
rate it must be moved. 

The sun could reach the green jar be- 
cause Orla and the Laughing Man had 
built their house on the top of a high 
cliff. It was a small nest full of bird's 
nests and growing things, and some- 
times there was a little garden at the 
side. A great tall pine stood at the 
very edge of the cliff, put there by the 
maker of the forest to guard the little 
house. Its very trunk leaned over and 
thrust out its arms when the sun was 
very hot, or when the rains beat very 
hard. The Laughing Man had gone 
away to bring Orla some new yellow 
beads from far below the cliff. It was 
very far, for the sun was sending its 
red rays through the trees in the east 
and by now he was far out of sight. 

Oh, but the dawn is glorious through 
a tree top. Two pairs of eyes watched 
it that day — Orla's big brown ones and 
Chimpy, the squirrel's little black ones. 
What fun it was to pretend not to see 
Chimpy and then to have him come up 
real close and take a look at you ! 

Orla, new and fresh as the day, skur- 
ried to the little stream they had blocked, 
and a tiny brown foot tested the moun- 
tain water. Birds and bushes bathed in 
the stream with Orla, but this morning 
it was a short bath and home to the 
house ran Orla. 

Skipping, running, singing, she 
reached the little gate of reeds- It must 
be hung carefully today— very carefully. 
The bit of a fireplace was cleaned up; 
the cobwebs were brushed away; the 
floor was brushed clean ; the rushes were 
shaken. 

The very air came to help Orla. It 
blew through the little house and filled 
it with lovely odors of pines and woodsy 
flowers. Finally it was finished. The 
sun was so hot that Orla slept, slept in 
the mossy nook that they had found one 
(Continued on Page 4, Column 4) 



A Word Of Explanation 

Here is the second La Vie Supple- 
ment published by the Green Blotter 
Club, an organization of Lebanon 
Valley students interested in produc- 
ing original literary work. 

The varying success of the articles 
contained in this issue is largely due 
to the help and encouragement given 
by Dr. and Mrs. Struble. 

It is proposed to publish additional 
supplements in the future as the oc- 
casion presents itself. 



If I Were God 

By Cerberus 



The Cold Shoulder 



VOU say the love you have for me 

Can never, never die away; 
That it won't lessen one degree; 
The world may pass, but you will stay; 
And that you'll always ready be 
To love, and honor, and obey. 

You say the love you have for me 

Can never, never die away; 

To your fond heart I hold the key ; 

In my hands you're but plastic clay 

That I'm your light, — your sunshine's 
ray ; 

That I'm the wine that makes you gay ! 
I know the love you have for me 
Can never, never die away, 
But tell me why the ice man made 
Ten stops here yesterday ! 

i — Anna Kondah. 



OH SAY IT NOT 

By Anna Kondah 

[ANGUAGE is by no means the only manner of communication used by man. 

Indeed, the conveying of ideas, however complex, from one individual to 
another i s a process in which language, either written or spoken, often plays 
hni a S m a n part. The florists' slogan "Say it with flowers" suggests the appall- 
lr, g inadequacy of mere words when a powerful and far reaching sentiment de- 
ma nds expression. Silence itself speaks- People who are on the "outs" refuse 
to ^lk to each other, thereby voicing, as it were, their mutual antipathy. Lovers, 
So 1 am told, don't have to say things. Their glances, their sighs, their shght- 
est motions, all serve to betray inner feelings which for ages have defied poets 
and artists in their feeble attempts at expression. Moreover, the words which 
^Pfe in that ecstatic state do use are only too often of that variety which have 

^olutely no meaning when uttered in other circumstances. These words and 
P Q nras es constitute the lexicographer's nightmare! Where, for instance, could 

" e fi nd the definition of ducky wucky, and where, oh where, might one be 
e to locate a classic parallel to: "Urn's pweshus 'ittle tootsy wootsy?" And 
JJ ( a gain I reiterate that this is hearsay on my part) all such expressions con- 
m e " s a profu ndity f meaning vast as the heaving bosom of the deep blue sea 

Uf eless as the infinite expanse of the universe. 
th e ri C ° nsider al so, the plight of the wretched hand-raised husband who, at 
pict nner table, when company is present, speaks not wisely, but too well. Or 
Witti , ' f y ° U please > the tragedy of the luckless bridge partner who has un- 
Partn COmrnitt ed an inexcusable infraction of technique, i. e. trumping his 
of " rs ace! Verbal reprimand, in instances of such nature, are usually out 
co nve but a br °adside of withering glances from an outraged spouse may 
mor e genuine malediction than a scalding torrent of the vilest abuse 
^7 with hissing expletives! By these presents, therefore, let it not be said 

( an guage is the Qnly vehide wh . ch mank . nd (hom(> sapiens) or womankind 

st «lta) can use to express a thought to his or her fellow being! 



It Could 
Have Happened 



By Joan 



«WOW dont' forget, Paul, one if by 
land and two if by sea." 

"I'll be waiting, Newman," Paul re- 
plied, "on the other side of the river. 
Now don't forget to light the lanterns 
before you hang them in the tower." 

The two men stood by the river and 
looked at the Old North Church from 
which the lanterns were to be hung. The 
brilliant red of the setting sun formed 
a halo around the tip of the old church's 
spire. Paul walked home whistling and 
thinking that surly spring was coming 
to Boston. Tonight would be a fine night 
for a ride and moreover he would be a 
hero in Boston tomorrow. 

At home his comely wife greeted him, 
"Paul, I've been house cleaning and 
did not have time to get the children 
ready for bed. You can undress them 
after you eat. Your food is in the iron 
kettle. It is high time I go and dress 
because our Tea Circle meets tonight. 

"But dear," Paul protested, "I have 
an important errand to do tonight. The 
alarm of the coming of the king's troops 
must be spread as soon as we know 
which way they are coming." 

"Paul, I'm tired of hearing about 
those important messages. The last time 
you gave me that excuse you spent the 
whole night at the tavern. I'm going to 
the Tea Circle and you are going to 
stay with the children." 

Paul could hear the swish swash of 
his wife's dress as she climbed the nar- 
row steps. Suddenly a loud bump was 
heard in the room over Paul's head. Paul 
took the steps two at a time. He found 
his wife sprawled amid wood and leather 
on the floor. Paul manlike asked, "Did 
you fall dear?" 

"Did I fall? You idiot, is this another 
one of your inventions ? You t>uy wood 
and leather when prices are high. Why 
I haven't had a new dress since the last 
boat from England came. You fool, if 
you make one more invention or boast 
(Continued on page 5, column i) 



THINK that I should like to be God 
for a time, just to see if some things 
must be. It might also be fun running 
humanity to suit one's individual taste 
in institutions, too, I suppose, until one 
got used to being God, whereupon things 
would probably be allowed to slip back 
into their former comfortable imperfec- 
tion, but nevertheless, I should just like 
to see, because I already have a pretty 
fair idea what would happen to some 
things, and that idea intrigues me. 

First I would scrap all our present 
day movie actors, directors, and scenario 
writers. I should not assign to the 
majority of them any special punishment, 
unless it were to make them sit through 
an endless performance of their own 
mediocre productions, which, come to 
think of it, is pretty diabolical after all- 
It is d*** nearly as bad as the special 
hell 1'vt. Jesigned for news-reel people, 
however, because it takes years to de- 
cide all the things that enter into the 
complex and abiding scheme of ven - 
geance I have worked out for them in 
a lifetime of movie-going. No matter 
when I enter a movie-palace they contrive 
somehow, to show me newsreels before 
I can leave. If I go in fifteen minutes 
after the time set for the show to start, 
they either start late or save the thing 
until the end of the picture, so that I 
have to say if I want to see the color- 
cartoon. If I say the hell with the car- 
toon and come in at about the time the 
feature should be starting, it invariably 
turns out to be a short feature, immedi- 
ately preceded by, of course, the in- 
escapable news-reel. If I resort to any 
one of the hundreds of subterfuges I 
have worked out to avoid the things, 
or use them in combinations even, in 
some fiendish manner totally inexpic- 
able to finite intelligence, I eventually 
find myself faced with the horrid ne- 
cessity of enduring the nauseating pro- 
cess of watching what I am fully con- 
vinced is a film identical in every detail, 
no matter how remote, with the same 
one I have seen a thousand times before. 
It begins by showing a rather bewilder- 
ing succession of scenes shown four at 
(Continued on page 5, column 2) 



OBSCURITY 

By Cynthia Fishbowl 



THE brooding darkness of sad hope- 
lessness descends upon me and I 
am alone, so terribly, utterly alone. 
Against barren skies wind swept 
trees bereft of their leaves in the 
merciless grips of oncoming winter 
sway drearily emitting a buzzing, a 
rusty crackling. Glowering and brood- 
ingly murmuring dull-lined clouds 
wind lazily and twist grotesquely 
thru that sky of seeming endless 
waste. I am irrevocably caught in 
that desperate net of loneliness which 
has at last taken me for its own. 
There is no one left. Here in this 
dreary spot I must slowly wither with 
never a soul to comfort me. In all 
this grim stretch of stern terse land 
so perversely set against my be- 
seeching there are none but me. 

Where have they gone? They have 
gone with all joy and laughter into 
that realm of sweet congeniality 
where the strong do not break under 
the noble strain, but pridefully and 
with head erect grasp life in a firm, 
confident grip and from it squeeze its 
just rewards. 

The weak, the strong, all have 
been wafted away by urgeless twist- 
ing fate into the ever widening net. 
And I — I am alone. 



Inspiration 

By Margaret Morton 



IT was early spring. The approaching 
night fell silently upon the drab old 
farmhouse. The ground was moist and 
fragrant and a refreshing breeze swept 
the trees. The moon came out in full 
glow and the stars shown brightly. A 
solid hush prevailed with the night. 

Presently the stars began to blink and 
go out, the moon became submerged in 
a heavy cloud and the breeze became a 
mild wind, then a stronger one. Drops 
of rain began to fall. Faster and faster 
they fell until at length they came al- 
most in torrents. 

The farmhouse was dark and silent. 
(Continued on page 4, column 5) 



A GROUP OF POEMS 

By Lucy Boltz 



52. 

J WAS so sad one night it seemed 

So very lonely and scared — 
Scared of — well I don't know what- 
I only wished I dared. 
I couldn't talk to anyone 
For no one was aroused 
So I let fall a heavy tear 
And it fell till it hit the ground. 
It sparkled so in the moonlight 
And twinkled a chuckly, "Boo!" 
I couldn't help myself— 
So I laughed, too. 

» • # 

54- 

O AIN 

*^And dark walls silhouetted against 
a 

Sky bright with pain. 
And looking out 

The leaves that danced so happily 
about 

Now tremble in the damp. 
Pellets of dullness, tears of heaven, 
Hammer straight paths downward 
As the day darkens. 



The glancing streets take on a 
Brighter hue 

When a light breaks softly in the 
west. 

Wet leaves and the smell of new- 
plowed fields 

And the birds calling mates 

Here and there clear the air. 

The sunset deepens and 

Stretches benevolent arms 

Across the evening dark. 

Glistening streets peep and glitter as 

The street lights dance at the corners. 

In the chill autumn evening 

I smell wood fires and see the 

Reddish glow of lights 

On supper tables. 



8. 

(JOMEHOW I can't forget 

The look that came upon your 
face 

The day when first I spoke to you — 
Your seeming, finite grace. 



PAGE FOUR 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 4, 1937 



Supp. 



The Necessity For 

By t 



An Infinite Reality 

Kant 



jyjAN as a conscious animal possesses 
at least six sentient receptors by 
means of which he maintains direct and 
multifarious contact with the world. This 
world of phenomena he has named Real- 
ity or Existence for the reason that it 
seems so substantial and tangible as con- 
trasted with void space about it. Dur- 
ing the entire period of man's philoso- 
phical history, in consequence, the term 
Reality has been monopolized by the 
world of finite things and events to 
which man himself pertains. Whether 
it is called Nature, the Cosmos, the 
World, or the Universe, we understand 
that these terms are meant to apply to 
all that man can sense and know, that 
is, the material world of finite pheno- 
mena. 

Out of general consideration has al- 
ways remained the possibility of an- 
other Reality just as valid as the one 
we know so familiarly. And yet it can 
be demonstrated that such a Reality must 
in truth be postulated as the only alter- 
native to that which for us is incon- 
ceivable, to wit, the unreality of Reality. 
For, it must follow, as the night the day 
that if the finite world is finite in time, 
or, in other words, has had a beginning 
and will take an end in time, it must 
have arisen either from something or 
from nothing. Now if it arose from 
nothing, then it is inconceivable that 
Reality should be anythng other than 
nothing. We are then forced to admit 
the unreality of our finite Reality. 

But there is an incomparably more 
welcome and satisfying alternative. Since 
our world had a beginning in time, and 
since the reality we attribute to it can 
not have derived from a negative un- 
reality or nullity, it follows that we must 



postulate a preexistent Reality. Fur- 
thermore, this posited Reality cannot be 
finite, for the reason that the finite world 
must have had a beginning in time, and 
our Reality is cx hypothesi prior to it. 
Now if it is not finite, it must, we can 
argue, be infinite. Thus is established 
the necessity for an infinite Reality, in- 
finite in space and time, just as the finite 
world is finite in space and time. 

Nevertheless it may be objected that 
the finite world we know is so evidently 
tangible and real, while there is no evi- 
dence of this infinite primordial world, 
even though it can be shown to be nec- 
essary. Yet what happens to the ma- 
teriality of our finite world when it is 
analyzed? We discover that all we know 
of this world is in the form of pheno- 
mena, and that these are not of the es- 
sence of matter. They are rather only 
the affects of motions of the essential 
substance. Of this substance, the inner 
Reality, the noumenon, as Kant called it, 
we know nothing, but only of the phe- 
nomena that arise from it. I perceive 
light waves reflected from an object. I 
gather sound waves emanating from an 
object. I smell minute particles which 
detach from it. Its electronic orbits re- 
sisting those of my hand excite cutaneous 
sensations. But still I cannot penetrate 
to the inner essence, and know the pheno- 
menon or the thing-in-itself. If then one 
does not know finite Reality through the 
senses, it is obviously unreasonable to ob- 
ject to an infinite Reality because we 
know nothing of it through the senses. 
They may be of a like nature as mother 
and daughter, differing only in this, that 
one is dynamic and in motion thus pre- 
senting phenomena, while the other, be- 
ing infinite, is immobile, stable, and 
eternal. 



Marybelle. should never know why he 
left Cisco without a last farewell. 

Then he had gone back East. He 
remembered the heat of the desert, the 
parched grass on the praries, the tall 
corn waving in Illinois fields, and gigan- 
tic structures of steel towering above 
New York's torrid sidewalks. It had 
been a veritable hell trying to forget 
Marybelle and Bill at first, but hunger 
pains in the stomach had given him 
something else to think about. 

Now he was here at Cisco, back from 
the toil and cares of years. Now he 
could watch the shadows on Red 
Mountain, see the the sun set gloriously 
with a burst of gold and red, and hear 
the Yuba murmer tales to itself of the 
romantic days of Forty-nine. Mary- 
belle might hear those tales of how, at 
nearby Dutch Flat, the waters of the 
Yuba had been used for hydraulic mining 
and how a mountain had been nearly 
! worn away to find the precious shining 
ore ; Marybelle might hear the murmur- 
ing of the rapid brook as it hurried by 
the little grave at his feet into which, 
after the birth of little Richard, Bill had 
laid her beautiful body to sleep by the 
singing stream where a kiss had sealed 
her promise. 

Then Maxwell arose, stretched his 
long arms, pushed his fingers through 
his iron-grey hair, and climbed up the 
stoney slope between the clumps of 
thorny manzanita bushes to see whether 
Bill and little Richard were hungry for 
their pork and beans. 



A Reverie 

{Continued from page 3) 

ing rivulet cascaded madly over large, 
reddish-brown stones. 

Listening to the mumbling of the Yuba 
and the murmuring of the wind in the 
tree-tops, Richard Maxwell thought he 
was listening to the music of the gods. 
The barren summit of old Red Moun- 
tain up there looked majestic enough to 
be Olympus as it pierced the serene, 
azure sky. Looking down upon the 
neighboring peaks, this imperial poin. 
seemed unconcerned that the Sierra Ne- 
vada claimed even more imposing look- 
outs than this one charged with defend- 
ing the trans-continental railway from 
fire or snow hazards. The rangers' sta- 
tion was a mere speck as seen from the 
valley, but yesterday Richard had made a 
trip on a pack-horse to carry provisions 
to the foresters as well as to view the 
panorama ; he knew how brightly the 
blazing sun shone as squinted on the 
mountain top, how the enormous loco- 
motives could be seen exerting astonish- 
ing power in drawing the train of heavily- 
loaded cars along the snake-like road- 
bed sliced out of the mountain side hun- 
dreds of feet above the Yuba, and how 
Lake Spaulding gleamed in the Califor- 
nia glare like a polished diamond. He 
knew all these scenes and loved them, 
for California was his native land. Ah, 
how fine it was to be alive in this calm 
forest, to smell the incense of the lordly 
pines and spruces, to hear the canary- 
like twittering of the Western Goldfinch, 
to see the scarlet Indian Paint Brush 
and the blue spikes of Wild Lupine, to 
feel the soft carpet of crisp needles sink- 
ing into the moist earth under one's feet. 

He was happy to be near Cisco again, 
for here there was peace and security. 
True enough, this little railroad settle- 
ment now lacked the animation of those 
old days when Southern Pacific employ- 



ees made merry at the hotel in the even- 
ings. He remembered how the friendly 
games used to culminate in furious 
wagering, the stakes sometimes amount- 
ing to thousands of dollars. The Lquor 
flowed freely in those times, too. Now 
all was quiet and still ; the boys were 
gone. Only a few decrepit bu Llings 
remained, including the box-car dwell- 
ings inhabited by greasy Italians. 

As he sat under the ancient i.r tha. 
miraculously found nourishment in a 
crevice of the rugged mountain ide over- 
looking the Yuba, MaxweL's mind 
turned to youthful pleasures in this 
enviroment. He thought of old friends — 
Tom Watson, who was killed in Fiance 
during the battle of Argonne ; Sam 
Sweeney, who married Kittie Sho. a- 
from Placerville ; Dick Findlay, who 
left Cisco to cradie for gold near 
Auburn; and Bill Collins, his b.s 
friend. 

Bill Collins ! Why, it was here by the 
Yuba that Collins had kissed Mary- 
belle. He had seen it, and he remem- 
bered it as if the lips of his "buddy" 
had only yesterday met those of the 
only girl he ever loved. Here by the 
Yuba he had determined that Bid should 
have her, that Dick Maxwc.l should 
remain a bachelor all his days, that 



•uspense 



"Isn't it Marvelous!' 



JJAWN broke suddenly on a cold, 
snow-covered world. The bloody 
sky stained the snow and was reflect- 
ed on the frozen pond. As the sun 
began to show, the sky faded slowly 
to a rosy hue ; the clouds looked like 
pink puffs of swansdown. The clear 
blue of broad daylight gradually ef- 
faced the rose-tinted colors of sun- 
rise. 

"Isn't it marvelous !" the young 
lover cried. "I never knew Techni- 
color could reproduce anything like 
this." 

— M. 



j^IEL sat in the straight-backed chair and 
waited. The clock struck three. How 
many hours he had sat there awaiting the 
verdict he didn't know. All that he cared 
was that the verdict should pronounce 
him a free man and then he could get on 
with his business. He was wasting time 
sitting there so many hours. His cus- 
tomers would expect him to take their 
orders for furniture back in that shop of 
his where everyone had been living so 
contentedly a week ago. Was it possible 
that one man's world could change so 
utterly? Niel sighed. Would they never 
tell him?. Was he to be haunted always 
and forever — how after hour — with that 
terrible feeling that people would think 
he was the cause of Grace's death? Was 
he never to be happy again? Never to 
enjoy the pleasant evenings at his fireside 
and never again feel free to return the 
stares in passing faces? It was so futile 
just sitting there. If he could only see 
them to tell them that he shouldn't be 
blamed for this awful thing—. The clock 
struck the half hour. Would that door 
never open? Would they never come 
out and tell him? He shifted his position 
and sat rigidly propped against the hard 
back of the chair. A voice said, "Take 
it easy, son. You'll know coon. You can't 
do anything now. Stop worrying — it's 
not your fault but the procedure has to 
be gone through. Stop thinking I" Niel 
saw his lawyer friend, Mr. Dougherty, 
staring at him consolingly. Nevertheless, 
staring — if only people wouldn't stare! 
It was hard enough everyone knowing 
about it without having them all staring 
at him in that curious manner people do 
and seeming to say, "We know what's 
coming, but a fellow in your shoes can 
expect that." Niel felt a cold nervous- 
ness in his tense muscles and they ached 
from sitting so long that way. Would 
those men never come? Didn't they care 
whether he was waiting or not? Didn't 
it mean anything to them whether he 
lived or died? Why must they stay so 
long? The clock struck four. Niel 
wriggled again and fixed himself in the 
uncomfortable chair. The other people 
gazed placidly, confusingly at him. He 
felt his eyes fill up with something or 
other. The face:; turned from him to 
that door as it slowly opened. A man 
came out and said to him, "Well, my 
son, it's a boy." — Lucy Boltc. 



The Wild or Tame 



^WISHING fluffy tail- 
Twitching velvet ears — 
Anxious little cat wail, 
Lonely kittie tears, 

Quivering silky whiskers , 
Great green blinking eyes, 
Wild teeth sunk in mouse furs, 
Purring lusty sighs. 

— Cynthia Fishbowl. 



Inspiration 



Orl 



a 



(Continued from page 3) 



day in Spring while hunting the first 
pink flowers. It was a long delicious 
sleep, guarded most carefully by Chimpy 
and hh little black eyes. 

The sun had crossed the pine. A little 
breeze blew a dry bit of brush upon 
the woodland couch. Up jumped Orla. 
Oh, it was late ! She ran to the edge of 
the cliff. The sun was sending its gold 
and pale orange tints up to the top of 
the sky. Away ran Orla for the very 
best purple bracelets she had. Was 
not the Laughing Man now coming up 
the mountain with yellow beads? 

Oh, there was the green jar. How 
tupid not to have fixed it before ! In it 
were the Laughing Man's treasures — 
dozens of gorgeous peacock feathers. 
They were Orla's treasures, too, and now 
the sun was changing them from green 
to blue and back again, so perfectly and 
so fast that she was spellbound. She took 
one from the jar — just for a moment, to 
hold it up nearer the light. Why, it 
:eemed alive ; it was a perfect thing. 

No wonder the Laughing Man loved 
them best of all. It was the most beauti- 
ful thing in the world. It was more 
beautiful than the sunset. 

But, listen ! Surely it was he com- 
ing, now, not far away. So startled was 
Orla that the feather r.he held slipped 
from her fingers. The wind caught it 
up. Away they raced — the wind and 
Orla. It was carrying the Laughing 
Man's treasure away. It should not. It 
must not. Around they chased and just 
as she reached for it, it slipped away. 
Oh, no, it must not go over the cliff — 
far away — where, OrTa knew not. On 
they raced. Nearer and nearer they went 
to the pine, which held out its arms to 
snatch the feather and then to hold Orla. 
Straight into the purple of the misted 
sunset the feather was carried and just 
as straight into it was Orla carried. It 
was the Laughing Man's treasure and it 
must be caught. 

As his* two treasures fell into the 
death of the day, the Laughing Man 
swinging a bright string of beads above 
his head, sprang up on the cliff and saw 
what the pine showed him through her 
branches. Then he laughed and laughed 
until the tree - , shuddered, the ground 
trembled, and the heavens roared. Chim- 
py ran to his very deepest hole, for he 
knew that it was the horrible laugh of a 
man who has lost his soul. 



(Continued from page 3} 
Duree, its only occupant, did 



from his seat by the table fo r 



not 



sti r 



and 

He undressed slowly, robed him 
a queer old nightgown then l ay do " n 



time- As he finally arose to » n 

so to 

other room, he picked up a cand] 
lit it. He walked into the next 



o\v n 



ten 



the soiled sheets of his small 

bed. Duree was very tired and 

but somehow he could not g t s j 

He lay seemingly lifeless with a , ep ' 
r ,. w °nder. 
ing-sort of dismayed look on his 

face. His long, graceful hand 

his brow as he emitted a deep sigh ^ 

hand that had dwelt with tumult, 6 
j . ..... , lt0Us Pas- 

J sion on the ivory keys. 

Finally, he got up and looked out f 
the window— gazing as someone j n 
trance. For a long time he ren^ 
thus. The wrath of the storm increased 
The wind grew stronger. All at once hi- 
fixed gaze shifted and a light arose ' 
his eyes- Perhaps the storm had f r i g h t 
ened him. He clasped his hands tightly 
together, his pulse quickened and h e aj, 
most gasped for breath. Then he emit- 
ted a short nervous shriek as he twirled 
around and ran from the room. 

His eyes filled with tears and madly he 
groped in the dark, then jealously, almost 
inhumanly, his fingers moved as they 
fell on the keyboard of his beloved piano. 
The cold perspiration rolled off his head 
as he played on and on with all the in- 
tense feeling of which his slight body 
was capable. He was like a madman pol- 
luted with emotion. 

After some hours his pulse became 
normal, his breath came at regular in- 
tervals and he became himself again as 
the first grey slits of dawn showed thru 
the window. He meditated a moment 
then slipped away. A moment later he 
fell again on his bed completely ex- 
hausted, but with the feeling that he had 
at last realized the joy and emotion of 
one who has felt a masterpiece within 
himself. This masterpiece had somehow 
remained suppressed within until the 
crucial moment when inspiraton had fired 
his soul to the heights. 



Acrostics 



Roll Back, oh time, your centuries 



for 



me, 



Fain Would I 



P"AIN would I declare my love, 
And fain would I to woo her, 
Or play the cooing turtle dove, 
With billing to undo her, 
That having won the joy I seek 
In cage or court or coppice 
We might in tender accents speak 
Nor care that aught might stop us. 

I Wit I .1111 not a turtle dove, 
Nor is, alas, I fear, my love — 
For all I wish she was one. 
So she could love the likes o' me — 
A thing that will and can not be 
Because she loves her husband! 

— Cerberus. 



Until Unbound I stand before the years 
That Closed my life before my W es 
could see 

How Kind you were,— how gentle # 
my tears. 

— Anna Kondah. 
# » * 

Oh blow, in accents long- 
Rehearse again your mournful song, 
As if repentant for some wrong- : 

When as the stars begin to blink, 
Earth shivers with the cold- 



She stops a moment, — tries to 



think, 



Then hears again this song of old- 
From icy lands I bring you death— 
An iceberg can't withstand my 01 
Long have I wailed in accents 
Long have I blown,— oh hear me 

-Anna Kond«»- 
# * # 

Roll Round, old world, however sl° 
Use Up all that energy. 
Then Die, but first please let & 
How You've enjoyed this life W 

Red Roses fall in fancy yet 

Upon Us quite relentlessly— ^6 

Don't Think, old world, that 1 

Your Hearty hospitality- ^ of td^ h 



— Anna 



f 

We 
Eve 
To 
And 

Tha 
The 
•Cau 



Ther 

It's 

But 

Let 

Of 

And 



Ther 

Who 

He: 

Whe 

The 

We 



It's s 
A se< 
Or T 
But c 
Or ui 
Will 
And 
And 
We'r 



1 



just 
mothe 

His 
other 

Poo 
the h 
"eight 
Promi 
tower 

Latt 
was 
discus 
Ws < 
belies 
When 
ev ent u 
gotten 



W] 
And 
Tha 



So 

And 

To 

*J 
T hi s 

Wd 

\\ 
And 
\ 
To, 



5LJP PLEMENT 



1 sti r 



1 s 

r °otti. 



Hopping 



'°ode n 
v °rn^ 

sleep, 
onder. 

Palid 
swept 
1 The 

B , 

3Ut of 

in a 
Gained 
r eased. 
!ce his 
ose i n 
fright- 
tightly 
he al- 

emit- 
wirled 

dly he 
almost 
; they 
piano, 
s head 
:he in- 
: body 
in pol- 

)ecame 
lar in- 
;ain as 
d thru 
loment 
,ter he 
ly ex- 
he had 
ion of 
within 
Tiehow 
il the 
d fired 



ies for 

; years 

' *° 

e with 
dah. 

ng, 



ink, 

dak- 
th * 

0> 



or 

The Thumbing Road 
To Learning 

TJ may think we're pretty dumb, 

\ g ut W e sure can use our thumb— 

i rrllv ever ride the omnibus. 

A* v we hop to college 
every ° y 

• nC rease our store of knowledge, 

(j the lads have learned, to their pro- 
found disgust, 
That the girls get all the chances, 
The boys a few stray glances- 
Cause f° lks have lots more s y m P ath y 

for us. 

There is n° need of choosing— 

tg s really quite amusing, 

gut of the cars we ride in most are new. 

us tell you of our meetings, 
Of our daily morning greetings, 
^ 1( f we're sure you'll come with us a- 

hopping, too. 

T l iere was a bearded grandpa 
ufao really was quite shocked — but ah, 
He stopped — we had a very stylish drive. 
When rescued by a truck 
The day we'd had poor luck, 
We were so glad it's strange that we 
survived. 

It's seldom that we go 
A second time with Joe, 
Or Tom, or Dick, whatever is his name. 
But oft a grad's fond cousin 
Or uncle — there've been a dozen, 
Will recollect the road to learning's fame. 
And though you may deride us, 
And even sternly chide us, 
We're sure we'll keep on hopping just 
the same. 

— M. 



It Could Have Happened 



{Continued from page 3) 



just once more I'm going back to my 
mother. Then let Boston talk!" 

His wife dressed without saying an- 
other word and left the house in a rage. 

Poor Paul he would not dare to leave 
th e house so he sent his son for his 
n «ghbor, John Colvin. Paul made John 
P^mise to watch for the lantern in the 
**** and then spread the alarm, 
ater m the tavern when the skirmish 
over the ride of John Colvin was 
fussed. Paul did not need many swal- 
b J s of Bermuda rum before he firmly 
^J 6Ved triat he had spread the alarm. 
eve en Paul believed a thing all Boston 

gotte^ 1 ^ bdieved iL CoIvin was for " 



' erhaps h >story is wrong! 



% Wishing Star 

^ D a wishing star 
en I was very small ; 



Tha t " ight * made a wish 
m 'ght soon grow tall: 

V;° Uld Weara train 
To g0 7 e ^ s made of gold- 

A 8all atl f ? nCeS With m * P rince ' 
dnt br ave and bold. 

Th" 

T n P w inCe WOuld com e to woo, 
T °tell l and kiss ™y hand, 
Vloff ' ethat llel °ved me, 
° ffer ^Id and land. 

A "OW T 

And Z hat I am older, 
> "earc^ J° ys have ^ 



To 



n g for the magic lamp 

n« .. . 

— Joan. 



rnake „ 

me sr nall instead 



J^AVTE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 4, 1937 



PAGE FIVE 



If I Were God 



(Continued from page 3) 



a time. They change so often you never 
get a chance to see what any of them 
are, however, and this fact leads me to 
suspect that the producers are trying 
to hide something from the public. If 
they don't want me to know about it, I 
wish they would stop throwing the fact 
that it's a secret in my face, anyhow, 
a secret irritates me. Besides it's in the 
worst of taste. After thus getting my 
intestines in a dither, the screen says 
in a voice that could not possibly have 
issued from any human throat, "This 
is Fox-Movietone, bringing to you the 
news of the day/" The italics on the 
exclamation point are Fox-Movietone's. 
You can distinctly "hear it, though God 
knows why. 

It has apparently never entered the 
head of this Fox-Movietone person who 
insists on bringing m e his damned news, 
that I have already read all I want of 
it in the round half dozen newspapers 
available at home two weeks before, and 
am therefore only less disposed to hear 
his asinine remarks on the subject, and 
look at his totally uninteresting photo- 
graphs than to bear with the sections 
in which I am definitely not interested. 
These latter consist of the football 
game, which seems to me a pointless 
manner of wasting time, the horse-race, 
which offers no thrill to one who is no 
sucker for the ponies, and the battle- 
ship, which impresses me as singularly 
lacking in news-value. A battle-ship is 
just a battle-ship, even if you fire off 
the guns in a cloud of smoke. There is 
nothing entertaining about cloud of 
smoke. This is usually followed by a 
bald-headed senator, ambassador, cabinet- 
member who talks for ten minutes 
through his nose, apparently to prove that 
he can read from the paper which he 
obviously is holding just out of the 
range of the camera. I must confess that, 
in spite of having heard the hapless wight 
at least three-thousand four-hundred and 
sixty-seven times, I have not the most 
remote suspicion what he is talking 
about, and am strongly inclined to the 
opinion that he has even less. 

These coals of fire, in themselves, are 
sufficient to sear the utmost tolerant 
brow, but when they add the burning 
brand which is disguised under the trade 
name of "Fashion Show" the pain be- 
comes utterly unbearable and I start 
looking about for murderous instruments, 
such as bludgeon-shaped radiators suit- 
ably shaped for throwing in fits of frenzv 
and plaster-of-paris statues of Venus, 
ideally adapted for the exercise of brute 
strength in devastating obnoxious pro- 
jection-booths. This so-called fashion 
show is described, rather unnecessarily, 
since one can see the models, as a rule 
without being told where to look, by the 
same unattractive female whose phy- 
siognomy used to be drawn on the cards 
in an old fashioned game called Old 
Maids. Her raucous voice makes silly 
remarks whose only relation to the 
activities in progress is that the dresses, 
or hats, are even sillier, whenever poss- 
ible. A friend of mine had been drinking 
a little before seeing the last one, and 
immediately swore off the rest of his 
life, on being confronted with a woman 
wearing, he avers, a flower-pot com- 
plete with flowers on her head: 

Sometimes they follow up this fiend 
in human form with a few shots of 
an imbecile named Lew Somebody-or- 
other, who is unable to speak even coher- 
ent English. He is always doing some- 
thing utterly absurd, and is, I think, sup- 
posed to be funny, which is sad. He is not 
nearly so sad, however, as my plight on 
discovering that he is followed cither 
by several views of a royal wedding, 
which differs in no particular from hun- 
dreds of thousands of other royal 



weddings, and is of no particular impor- 
tance anyway, as a rule, or the Musso- 
lini picture, which last is so nauseatingly 
familiar that I shall not make an attempt 
to describe it. It usually concludes the 
program for the evening, and at the 
same time, causes the optomistically 
minded to consider that although it 
couldn't conceivably be worse than it 
is, it could be considerably longer, 
which is anyhow something for which 
to be thankful. 

For the chaps who turn out these 
miserable productions I have devised 
in my mind's eye a sort of infernal 
Trans-Lux which will show a never- 
ending succession of the things I have 
described with certain additional effects, 
which ought to add to the interests 
of the business. When they become 
bored pretty stiff and get up to leave, 
they will find the place labrythine in 
its nature, and so constructed, that no 
matter where they step they will see 
another print of the same reel they have 
just seen. This, in fact, will be the only 
film in the house, but it will be continu- 
ally renewed. I think I will try, how- 
ever, to have the musical effects re- 
moved from the sound track, so that a 
special band assembled from the most 
diabolical friends at my command can 
act as the orchestra, which will play 
the Stars and Stripes for ten thousand 
years at a sitting. They will vary this, 
after a couple of aeons with Pennsyl- 
vania, which ought to remind the boys 
to change the record once in a while if 
they ever get back to earth, which they 
won't. In addition, celebrities whose pho- 
tographs are difficult to obtain will act 
as the ushers and continually bash in 
the skulls of any cameraman who looks 
like he might want to take a picture if 
he had his camera, which of course, will 
be destroyed, as soon as the new regime 
goes into effect ; also a voice from a 
hidden speaker will continually interrupt 
the show with an announcement that 
war has broken out in Peru, radicals 
have just blown up San Francisco, Hit- 
ler is about to be assassinated, and so 
forth. When they attempt to rush to the 
scene of activity they will be stopped by 
Satan himself, who will cut off their 
noses with a pair of red-hot hedge shears 
to remind them of the inadvisability of 
the course of action they are attempting 
to pursue. There will also be certain 
(Continued on page 6, column 1 ) 



Spring 

I HEARD the sudden April breeze 

Make whispered promises to all the 
trees — 

And to the pussy willow by the fields 
I heard her say, "Come out, my dear, 
And show your velvet face 
Among your little shields. 

The winding stream seemed glad to 

meet the road, 
And gurgled its bright greeting as it 
flowed. 

It paused a moment by an elm 

To hear the robin sing, 

Then danced o'er pebbles clean and 

and smooth, 
In honor of the spring. 

The redwing, and the meadow lark, 
The bobolink, and I 
All sang with joy to be alive 
Beneath the smiling sky. 

— Anna Kondah. 



I\THERE was a youg fellow dabed 
Ted, 

Who was by dthe bilde weather bisslead, 

He did't dow a thig 

3out tricky owed Sprig, 

Add dow he has a code id dthe head. 

—Anna Kondah. 



THERE IS NO FRIGATE 



QXE evening as the sun went down in far-off Hindustan', 

A pair of lions laid their plans to catch a travelling man. 
They heard his steps along the path and waited to receive him; 
They hoped to ease his burdened mind, and from his pain relieve him. 
And so they waited, crouching low, their tufted tails a-wagging, 
Until their supper should appear, with footsteps slow and lagging. 
Closer the luscious tidbit came, in earnest meditation— 
The lions licked their dripping chops in great anticipation. 
Their unsuspecting prey advanced, a book beneath his arm- 
He bravely stepped into their midst, and showed no fear of harm. 
The lions circled round their meal like flies around molasses, 
But fearlessly he took his book, and read from Pippa Passes. 
And then he read a chapter from a speech of William Bryan's. 
To end the tale it might be said, He Read Between The Lions. 

— Anna Kondah. 



Wight on a Rool 

By Charon 



"THE stars shine — the moon glows and 
floods all the world with her white 
beauty. The heavens are black and the 
stars twinkle like a myriad of tiny lamps 
lit each night by the angels. Not far 
from the moon, old Luna herself, is the 
"Star of Bethlehem," the most wonder- 
ful star in the heavens. 

If I ever wished to go somewhere, 
sometime to medidate upon the world 
and its strange happenings, I would 
name the place— on the roof; the time — 
midnight. 

Let me use my imagination and tell 
you my idea of heaven on earth. 

Out in the country, far from all city 
noises and disturbances, there is a small 
house. Its roof is flat, with a banister 
around it, so that I may enjoy a cool 
evening on the roof without the danger 
of a sudden fall to the ground. There is 
a deck-chair, placed in such a position 
on the roof, that, when reclining, the 
stars seem to be peering into my eyes as 
though trying to read my mind. 

As the hour of midnight approaches, 
the moon advances until it is directly 
over my head. The silver beauty of the 
moon floods my roof until it is as bright 
as day. The trees around my house are 
outside the silver radiance. The owls 
are softly hooting and the whip-poor- 
wills are gently calling. Down in the 
stream, a frog croaks as the water goes 
murmuring on its serene way. 

I sit deep in my chair, watching the 
stars and the moon. I wonder, as I sit 
there, why the stars do not twinkle and 
the moon does not show its beauty in 
the daytime so that all may see this 
beauty which is as yet unsurpassed. True, 
the stars and the moon need the black 
of the night to set off their beauty; so I 
realize that God knew best when He 
made them to shine in the night. 

I sit there, gazing steadily at the star- 
sprinkled heavens and find myself wish- 
ing to touch the stars and the cool- 
looking moon. This desire grows until 
I find myself floating — floating upward — 
gently floating, and I realize that I am 
falling asleep. 

I reach the stars and fall asleep just 
as I touch one cool and sparkling tip. 
Through the night I sleep, holding tight- 
ly to the star. I wake in the morning 
only to find that my star is gone and the 
sun is brightly shining. I go about my 
day's work, waiting for night to fall 
once more. 



49- 

J SAW the moon in a black coat 

And it shone from a corner at me. 
Do you think — or don't you — 
That the moon could see. 
And did he talk to me? 
Sometimes I think I've heard him 
When the wind knocks on the pane 
And he says, "Can you stop and talk- 
I'm so lonely — 
Or shall I come back again?" 

— Lucy Boltz. 



50. 

'J'HE damp green rocks 

That shine in the sun 
And glisten under the moon 
Are so peaceful ancl still 
When the shade comes on. 
Do they whisper 
Or talk 

Of excursions in the day 

Or do they just sit 

All the time that way? 

— Lucy Boltz. 



Recked In The 

Cradle of The Sheep 



Last night I thought I'd hit the hay, 
To rest my bones from yesterday. 
And thought perhaps that I could sleep, 
With soothing slumber, soft and deep. 
So I removed my coat and vest — 
My shirt, and socks, and all the rest 
That I must shed to be undressed, 
And hied myself to bed. 
But as I lay there in a heap 
T found I couldn't go to sleep, 
And so I started counting sheep, 
And this is what I said : 

"One sheep, two sheep, three sheep, four ; 
Five sheeep, six sheep, — golly day — 
How'd they come in — through the doorr 
Wher'd they come from anyway? 
Seven sheep, eight sheep, nine sheep, ten ; 
What do they think this is— their pen? 
They stand around and stare at me. 
Am I a curiosity?" 

They all maintained a perfect poise, 
They thought they were polite! 
And didn't make a bit of noise. 
They came and snuffed my pillow case, 
And chewed my hair and licked my face, 
And took possession of the place, 
Throughout the live-long night! 

At five o'clock *?his morning, 

Without a word of warning, 

They started to disperse. 

They took their leave so sweetly, 

So calmly and so neatly, 

That I must tell you all about it 

In this simple verse. 

They climbed upon my window sill, 
And out they all did jump. 
I could not see them hit the ground, 
But heard the wooly bump ! 

What they did next I'm not quite sure, 
At least they didn't stay. 
'Cause o'er the campus I could hear 
Them scooting far away. 

Ah what relief! I tossed with joy! 
And tumbled out upon the floor! 
Then I woke up, and never felt 
So sheepish in my life before. 

— Anna Kondah. 



i 



I 



PAGE SIX 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 4, 1937 



Suppi. 



Stone 

| FEEL the warm and gentle breeze 

Sweep over me in waves — 
I smell the scent of tropic seas, 
And far Hawaiian caves. 
The sailing clouds go silently 
Across the endless sky, 
And one by one they beckon me — 
As sailing on that placid sea, 
And drifting through eternity, 
They motionless go by. 

But still the dross that is myself, 

And all things that I own, 

Have kept those seas a dreary waste — 

Have kept me in myself encased, 

A lifeless thing — 

A stone. 

— Anna Kondah. 



it is produced. This low-brow tendency 
is even more pronounced in the rough- 
house doings of Pop-eye, the sailor and 
his droopy goil-friend Olive Oyle, and 
is, I fear, the secret object of emulation, 
and possibly adulation by millions of 
children who very likely have never 
heard of the things they're missing by 
not spending the time in reading Mark 
Twain. In other words, I put forth the 



Triolet 



B 



ECAUSE I asked her for a drink 

heart became much 



My woeful 
lighter. 

Why did she blush? It was, I think 
Because I asked her for a drink. 



But why the smile? And why the wink? 
principle that a nation which expects to Well, anyway, the day seemed brighter. 



Kaleidoscope 



pLOWERS blooming in the sun, 

Fishes swimming in the run, 
Lovers brooding in the shade, 
Life's eternal boy and maid 
Sighing 'cause they've lost the summer. 
Tell me, dear, could things be dumber? 

— Margaret Morton. 



If I Were God 



(Continued from page 5) 



auxiliary tortures which space does not 
permit me to mention here. 

For their cousins, engaged in the pro- 
duction of other short-subjects, a some- 
what similar, though not so gruesome 
fate awaits, because they very occa- 
sionally produce something interesting. 
They will, of course, have to suffer some, 
though, because the large proportion of 
the things they turn out are so patently 
idiotic. I think I shall mete out the 
worst end to the chap who thinks up 
travelogues, whether plain, colored, 
sounding, or soundless. They are all 
equally and eternally boring. In fact, 
I fail to see how they could manufacture 
anything quite so dull, unless it were on 
purpose. It has a close second in the 
juvenile, and musical shorts, which all 
apparently presume that each member of 
the audience has come equipped with a 
complete outfit of rattles, stearick power, 
and diapers. There is a class of short 
subject, however, which must be dealt 
with separately, to wit, the ones that 
try, consciously, to be funny. There is 
really nothing so completely and pite- 
ously devoid of any vestige of humor, 
unless it be the cow-eyed Eddie Can- 
tor, anent whom more later. I have not 
included the cartoons in this class, be- 
cause I rather like them, and shall re- 
quire only minor changes in their sub- 
ject matter, such as the abolition of 
such obviously inane business as Mickey 
Mouse, and Pop-eye the sailor, and the 
substitution of characters taken from the 
cartoons appearing in some of the maga- 
zines which pride themselves on their 
so-called sophistication. Perhaps I am 
merely finicky, but it seems to me that 
there is something essentially low-brow 
about a civilization that enjoys watching 
the highly effeminate activities of a rod- 
ent which displays none of the charac- 
teristics of fine humor save that intan- 
gible brightness which it derives from 
the peculiarity of the medium in which 



endure can not raise its young on a cul- 
ture which has for its basis a vulgar 
swab and a rather silly rodent. To those 
who point to the classics, I can only, say 
that Aesop, certain of the Latin poets, 
and LaFontaine are not always at their 
best. 

But one of the largest changes I shall 
make on taking over the universe will 
be in the production of the feature cine- 
mas, which, as it is carried on at present 
prefers to cater pretty largely to the 
idiot fringe. It happens that there is an 
appreciable proportion of the people who 
are inclined to view whatever is put be- 
fore them with eyes more wondering than 
critical. In no respect is this more true 
than in the attitude they take toward 
the movies; if fifty millions dollars of 
the producer's money says it's good, who, 
the cash customer tends to think, am I 
to disagree? 

For that reason he is forced to tolerate 
what in terms of dramatic evaluation 
amounts to almost absolute zero in a 
large percentage of the pictures that are 
put before him. What is worse, after a 
time he comes to like it, the adaptive 
ability of the human race being what it 
is. Therefore, those of us who cling 
stubbornly to what we have of critical 
discernment are forced to endure the 
spectacle of a nation supposedly com- 
posed of sane adults kowtowing at the 
shrine of a brat with a pretty smile. I 
refer to Miss Shirley Temple who ought 
to be spanked for the disobedient pranks 



Because I asked her for a drink 
My woeful heart became much lighter- 
— Anna Kondah. 



On Seeing The Flood 



On Kissing 



IfISS if you must, but 

Do it nea'tly, do it sweetly, 
Do it seldom and discreetly; 
Some do it passionately, 
Others more sedately. 
I don't advise it, anyway 
It isn't sanitary. 



yHE cold, fast water, 

Darker than the starless night, 
Called out to me, 
"There is forgetfulness here." 
I was afraid and ran away 
To hit my head against the rising sun- 

— Joan. 



To My Dead Canary 



'HE room is still — 

I hear no merry songs. 
The shadow of your empty cage 
Forms prison bars upon the walls. 
My yellow powder puff 
No longer calls. 

— Joan. 



commission a number of the more ar 

". , , „„ r i„ it, „ 1Kn : rps tistic scriveners to construct good pho 

in which she engages under the auspices 1 . 



duce pictures in the incredible volume 
which at present pours in one vast un- 
distinguished stream of mediocrity from 
the fountainheads in Hollywood, Lon- 
don, and New York. Instead I shall 



of Fox-Twentieth Century, as in fact 
she would be if her screen-parents were 
even one-third human. But instead, they 
genuflect all over the place, and seem 
to like it, as the fans certainly do, in 
spite of the fact that it is directly con- 
trary to all reason, and an obvious at- 
tempt to show off little Miss Temple's 
charming smile at the expense of the 
yarn and the people in the cast who are 
old enough to know how to do something 
more by way of amusing the customers 
than to sing out of tune, or tap-dance. 

The subject of tap-dancing brings to 
mind the musical rhows, which I shall 
abolish entirely, because the persons who 
concoct them seem to believe that the 
elixir of entertainment consist of a big, 
clumsy assortment of tap-dancers, bum 
singers, rotten jokes, worse songs, set- 
tings that look like the realization of 
something from the Confessions of an 
English Opium-Eater, a few pretty girls, 
several necking sequences and a general 
lack of sanity on the part of everybody 
concerned with the incongruous monu- 
ment to bad taste. It is my personal be- 
lief that none of these things are either 
amusing or instructive, and therefore I 
shall refuse to tolerate them. As God, 
I think I shall not be accused of an 



toplays at their leisure, for acting by 
actors who will be selected for their 
ability to act, rather than their talent 
for making funny face;;, or other acro- 
batic achievements. 

Of course, the celestial coffers are like- 
ly to suffer somewhat as the result of 
this process, but as God, I think I shall 
be able to afford it. And even though 
Tillie Glutz and her sappy boy-friend 
Joe Bass will not be able to neck in time 
to the mooing of Nelson Eddy in the 
saccharine tinged atmosphere of the Bi- 
jou, like the poetess, I shall not care. 

In doing this it is apparent that God 
is a selfish God, because he changes 
everything around to suit himself, with- 
out consulting the aforementioned Miss 
Glutz and company, who, after all, will 
have to take the consequences of His 
action. If this is the thought that is 
running through your head, please re- 
member that when I am God, I shall be 
omniscent, and therefore, if I deprive 
Tillie of her love stories, I, in my in- 
finite loving-kindness, must be assumed 
to be doing it for her own good. It is 
my opinion that that is exactly what I 
shall be doing, as a matter of fact. In 
other words, it is my opinion that if 
Tillie, and her mother before her, very 



Matrimony by Mail 

By Weltanschauer 

THE long-awaited moment was at hand. 

Silas Adams looked at his watch and 
coughed nervously, observing that in a 
few minutes the train would pull into the 
Union Station at Washington, where his 
own Toots would be at hand to greet 
him warmly. He wondered whether she 
would kiss him right there on the, plat- 
form- He hoped not, for it would be 
embarrassing to be kissed in such a place 
before so many people. Kisses, he 
thought, were sacred things; kissing 
should be reserved for romantic settings. 

Romantic settings? Kisses? Few of 
them he had known during his married 
life with Annie. She was so frigid. Why, 
even during their courtship she had re- 
primanded him for "acting ungentleman- 
ly" when he pecked her cheek as they 
rode to her home in a buggy after at- 
tending vesper services at the Methodist 
Church. She said that only engaged cou- 
ples should kiss, he remembered ; but he 
also remembered that when they were 
engaged, she demanded that they wait 
until they were married. Then, once 
married — well, Annie was too busy rais- 
ing chickens, milking cows and baking 
pies to waste time doing things like 
that. No wonder that he craved a little 
affection now that he was a widower at 
forty-five. 

Well, Toots would be different. Her 
letters had always been so sweet, just 
overflowing with affection. Why, he 
could never forget the pretty words she 
wrote after he sent her the diamond 
necklace along with his photograph. 
She hadn't even written an unkind word 
about his bald head. Oh, Toots was a re- 
markable woman! 

The train was in the depot now. He 
took a last look at his tie to be sure 
that it was neatly clamped to his shirt — 
it was that striped tie Toots had sent 
him for Christmas, and he wanted her to 
see how much care he had taken to pre- 
serve the luster of the red, the green, 
and the other colors in it- She wouldn't 
know that he had never worn it before 
because the boys at the grocery store in 
Frog Hollow would have "teased the 
living daylights out o' him." He stroked 
a few long hairs into place ; their useful- 
ness in helping to make the shining bald 
head less conspicious rendered them one 
of his charming assets, he thought. 
Glancing towards the crowd on the plat- 
form outside, he followed the other pas- 
sengers to the end of the coach when the 
train stopped with a jerk and the con- 
ductor cried out, "Washington ! Wash- 
ington !" Now he must find Toots in the 
crowd. Silas stood on the platform wait- 
ing for his Toots to rush up to him and 
embrace him. Five minutes passed. Ten 
minutes passed, but he saw nobody who 
resembled the photograph his sweetheart 
had sent him. He waited five minutes 
longer, thinking that Toots had been un- 
able to find him in the crowd. But when 
the mob had thinned to the consistency 
of meringue, Silas' spirits, once soaring 
over Mt. Everest, were groveling in the 
sands of Death Valley. He decided that 



«IAUGH! Laugh! It is funny!" 

L "Is it?" 
i see no fun ; I see no sky 
Nor clouds which go awhirling ^ 
For me no sunshine; just the rain 
Until my love comes back again. 
You see a bird; you hear his song. 
I hear it fall ; I see the wrong — 
A sun that scorches, winds that burn 
While down my own dry throat T 
yearn 

To taste the spring, to feel it cool 
My own reflection in the pool. 
And still you say, "Laugh, laugn, be 
gay! 

How could you be another way?" 

— Lucy Bolts, 



attempt at being facetious when I say, | likely, had not been reared in an at- 



"To Hell with the musicals!" Having 
thus disposed of two of the most promi- 
nent types of contemporary movie fare, 
I am left with a few good shows and 
quite a quantity of tripe. This tripe con- 
sist of any picture containing anything 
that looks remotely like that disgustng 
nit-wit, Joe E. Brown, tough-guy Cag- 
ney, Dick Powell, the sap, Mae West, the 
prostitute disgusting, and so on ad in- 
finitum. These gentlemen are provided 
with vehicles for their activities by the 
occupants of Matteawan, by the Home 



mosphere so tinged on all sides with 
the false culture supplied by the movies 
and other similar purveyors of senti- 
mental and other varieties or rot, she 
might prefer to stay at home and read 
Shelley, or Plato, or somebody construc- 
tive like that. In fact she might even 
read me, which is all to the good, since 
it swells the heavenly purse. I realize, 
of course, that Tillie is not likely to go 
in for culture just because I take bum 
movies away from her, but just think 
how I would stand to cash in on her 



Reflection 



Toots had been detained by some matter 
of extraordinary importance, for, having 
received his letter telling her that he 
was coming to Washington on that train, 
nothing less than a Miami hurricane 
could have prevented her being at the 
Union Depot to meet him. 

True, it was that she had not an- 
swered his letter, he thought as he 
glanced at the newspaper stand to his 
right as he walked out of the station 
and stood facing the Columbus memorial 
fountain, but certainly her silence could 
only mean consent. He had not con- 
sidered formalities necessary in such an 
intimate friendship as theirs. 

Friendship? Was it then a mere friend- 
ship ? He had believed that they were in 
love, deeply in love, madly in love. Au- 
tomatically he walked up East Capitol 
Street, when the idea dawned that she 
might have a 'phone in her "darling 
little apartment" — as she had described 
her living quarters. 

He went back to the station to call 
and see whether she was at home. If 
not, then he would wait at the station a 
few minutes more, for certainly she must 
then be on her way. 

There was a 'phone listed. He dialed 
the number with difficulty, having only 
once before — in Boston — used a dialing 
appartus. A voice answered. He asked 
for his Toots. 

"Miss Bogus?" 

"Yes." 

"This is Silas." 
"Silas who?" 

"Why, your Silas, Silas Adams from 
Frog Hollow." 

"Oh, yes, hello Silas. How are you?" 

"Fine, thank you." 

"That's lovely. I'm awfully sorry I 
couldn't get down to the station to meet 
you — " 

"That's perfectly all right-" 

"You see, I was called up to Rockvilk 
last night, and I just got home about a 
half hour ago, and then my boy Wend 
just called up that he was bringing his 
boss up to dinner, so I've just been ga- 
ting that, and it's coming along nicety- 

"Did you get my letter?" 

"Yes. Did you get the birthday gr eet ' 
ing I sent you?" 

"No, not yet." 

"Why, that's funny. I mailed one 
Wednesday night." 

"Oh, it will probably be coming along 
'tomorrow. Oh, Toots— er— Miss Bog 
— er — " 



— M. 



for Indigent Old Maids, and miscellane- 1 daughters, and granddaughters. In time, 
ous moron mills throughout the country, ! I think being God might even become 
so I shall also consign them and their very lucrative. 

writers to the future abode of all good Note: This is one of a series of es- 
politicians and settle back to recon- says by the same author, who is ap- 
struct the cinema along worthwhile lines, parently trying to see how far you can 
I shall not, of course, attempt to pro- [go with civilization. 



J SEARCH myself, but cannot find a 
trace 

Of worthiness in large or small degree. 
I've reached then this conclusion : that 
you see, 

While you are gazing deep into my eyes, 
Reflections of your own sweet modesty. 

— Anna Kondah. 



Limerick 



JN London a traveler from Maine 

Told some gags to the men on a train, 
But as usual, the blokes 
Could not see the jokes, 
So the gags were related in vain. 

— Anna Kondah. 



"I'm so sorry I couldn't get down 



this 

a 111 a<j suiiji x k-uuiuu 1. e> — y 

morning, but some other time when y ^ 
come to Washington, I'll come doWn e; > 
the station. You let me know next ti 
"Yes, but—" iflner 
"I'll have to hang up now, my 
is cooking and I must attend to » • , 



write you another letter in a co 



other 



days. And you let me know son ^ ngton . 
time when you come to Was 

Goodbye -" u A ver 

A clicking sound was heara jf 

wire, and Silas stood a moment^ ^ 

too perplexed to realize where ^ 

Then he started walking toWaf al £*- 

gate marked "New York Federa ^ 

press, 1 p. m." As he walked, e ^ ^ 

bled, "I'm goin' to write a lettd ■ ^ 

dratted matrimonial agency * ^ 

them to take my name off their 



a* 

A 

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a close 
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Paul 
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3 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 4, 1937 



PAGE SEVEN 



be 



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j V. C. Quintet Loses 
f Muhlenberg Mules 

FlN AL SCORE IS 43-41 

v/arsity Five Drops Close De- 
cision In Rough Fray At 
^llentown 



Lebanon Valley's varsity five dropped 
lose decision to the Muhlenberg Mules 
3 r0 ugh contest on the Allentown High 
'"ol court last Saturday night by a 
! 1 score of 43-41- Fisticuffs enlivened 
fray midway in the second half, and 
plying Dutchmen played the closing 
^Yiutes without the services of Captain 
Paul Billett, Raymie Frey, and Clair 
Snell- 

Billett was the first L. V. C. dribbler 
prced to retire from action. Following 

tangle underneath the basket, the Blue 

j White leader came to blows with 
\{cKee, big Muhlenberg center, and only 
the prompt action of the officials pre- 
•ented a general scramble among the 
members of the opposing quintets. Bil- 
let and McKee were each given one foul 
chance and ejected from the fray. Ten 
minutes of play remained at the time. 

pour minutes later Frey committed his 
fourth personal foul and was involun- 
tarily retired to bench duty, and before 
another two minutes had passed Clair 
Snell was called out on personals on a 
screwy decision in which the refs dis- 
agreed. 

With four minutes of play remaining 
the Muhlenbergs led, 41 to 38, and a 
quintet composed of R. Billett and Kress 
at forwards, Aungst at center, and 
Brown and Bachman in the backcourt 
fought valiantly to overcome the three- 
point advantage. Ralph Billett counted 
two points on a nifty one-handed poke 
to slice the margin to a single point, and 
Ed Kress deadlocked the count at 41 -all 
by converting a foul chance. However, 
Tracey sank a long side shot during the 
last thirty seconds of play to give the 
Mules the two-point advantage represent- 
ed by the final figures, 43-4 1 - 

The defeat cost the Valleyites an op- 
portunity to clinch the third spot in the 
league standings, and the Metoxenmen 
will now have to score a win over Al- 
bright's Lions on the home court on 
Saturday night to gain undisputed pos- 
session of third place. 

Paul Billett split the cords on a nifty 
overhead poke to open the scoring after 
tw o minutes of play. Kohler retaliated 
with a two-pointer from in close, and 
p rey and Dietrick traded field goals. An- 
ther basket by Frey on a pass from P. 
Billett, a foul conversion by Ralph Bil- 
K and a shot by the L. V. C. captain 
from underneath the basket gave the 
^ue and White a 9-6 advantage. Brown 
and Frey netted neat one-handed pokes 
and Frey counted a singleton to increase 
L - V. C. total to 14 before Kohler 
COu «ed a foul for Muhlenberg. Two 
{ ° u ' goals by Bob Brown, a charity toss 
0r Kohler, and another neat one-handed 
tw ° Pointers by Brown changed the fig- 
^ to 18-8. McKee's pivot shot was 
^«set by Snell's side shot before the 

u fes staged a rally that brought them 
M Z n one P°l nt °f tying the count. 

pee and Grossman each counted two 
goals and Dietrick counted a foul in 

ls uprising, and Ralph Billett's long 

.. ot gave L. V. C. a 22-19 edge at half- 
"He. 

S0Q ^ ey committed his third personal foul 
^clT ^ e secon< * *=" 0t unc ^ er way > 



■ett 



^ ee converting the chance. R. Bil- 
^ rteat one-handed shot and Paul 

c °u'nt tS P °k C * r ° m ^ e ^° U " ^' ne WCre 
, er "balanced by two-pointers- by 

Md and McKee - Lebanon Valley 

4 a 26-24 lead at this point, and 

ty h ! 8st subbed for Frey in the Blue and 

f 0ul ' te lin eup. Paul Billett converted a 

taj n p 0ss before two field goals by Cap- 

f 0r th r ° ss man gav e Muhlenberg the lead 

Ver ted C ^ rSt ^ me at 2 ^~ 2 '" Tracey con- 
a foul goal and a field chance to 



Freshmen Down Juniors 
In Class Court League 

R. Billet Officiates; Davies 
Sinks Ball In Freshman 
Basket 



The inspired frosh assured themselves 
of at least a tie for second place in the 
Interclass Basketball League by swamp- 
ing the Juniors 38-22 on Monday night. 
The frosh led right from the start. Their 
tight defense held the juniors to one 
field goal in the first half. Scoring honors 
were captured by Howard Peffley, flashy 
frosh forward, with 13 points. The sec- 
ond half was featured by a most unique 
play. Gordon Davies, junior guard, got 
the ball and shot it cleanly through the 
hoop. The only trouble was that it was 
the wrong hoop, thereby being scored as 
a goal for the freshmen. Davies thereby 
becomes an honorary member of the 
freshmen team. No account of the game 
would be complete without a word of ap- 
proval of the job of officiating turned in 
by Ralph Billett. He called numerous 
fouls, but it was easily the cleanest game 
played this season in the league. 



increase the lead to four points as Ray- 
mie Frey returned to action. Paul Bil- 
lett and McKee got into a scrap under 
the basket and both players were ban- 
ished from the game after shooting a 
single foul try. The Lebanon Valley 
captain converted his chance, and a foul 
goal by Ralph Billett cut the Mule ad- 
vantage to 32-29, with ten minutes of 
play remaining. Grossman counted a 
two-pointer and Brown retaliated with 
another sensational one-handed poke. 

Martin registered a single counter and 
Frey brought the figures to 35-33 with 
a beautiful heave from mid-court. Die- 
trick netted a field goal and foul and 
Snell converted two free chances to 
change the figures to 38-35 with six min- 
utes to go. Frey committed his fourth 
personal, Dietrick failing in the single 
charity try- Snell came through with a 
long shot to cut the Mule advantage to 
one point, and Clarence Aungst counted 
a free throw to clase the gap at 38-all. 
Kohler counted for the Muhlenbergers 
on a dribble-in and Snell was forced out 
of action on his fourth foul, Eddie Bach- 
man taking over his guard duties. Tra- 
cey converted the chance to change the 
score to 41-38. Ralph Billett counted a 
nifty one-handed shot and Lebanon Val- 
ley again deadlocked the count when 
Kress converted a foul toss. Tracey 
counted on a long shot from side court 
in the last thirty seconds of play to give 
the Mules a 43 to 41 win. 

The lineups : 

Lebanon Valley 

G. F. T. 

R. Billett F 328 

Kress F 1 1 

Frey C 4 I 9 

Aungst C o 1 1 

P. Billett G, F 328 

Brown G 328 

Snell G 226 

Bachman G 000 

Totals ,~ 15 11 4i 

Muhlenberg 

G. F. T. 

Tracey 226 

Grossman F, G 5 2 12 

Martin F, C 1 1 

McKee C 4 1 9 

Kohler G 3 2 8 

Dietrick G 2 3 7 

Totals 16 11 43 

Referees, Fisher and McQuire. 

Lebanon Valley 21 20—41 

Muhlenberg 19 2 4~ 43 



WOMEN DEBATERS FILL 

VIGOROUS SCHEDULE 



(Continued from page 1) 



Jean Harnish. Dr. Black presided at 
the debate, which was considered unus- 
ually interesting by the audience. 

On Thursday evening Hazel Hemin- 
way and Jean Harnish upheld the affir- 
mative side of the industrial question 
in behalf of Lebanon Valley at Buck- 
nell University, The jdrls represented 
our college exceedingly well on this 
night, speaking with a cool deliberation, 
poise, and intellect which could not be 
matched by their opponents. This also 
was a non-decision debate. The rest of 
the group which visited BuckneU con- 
sisted of Louise Saylor, Lois Harbold, 

Grace Naugle, manager, and Professor 
Stokes, coach. 



NOMINEES FOR Y. M. C. A. 
CABINET FORMALLY CHOSEN 



(Continued from page 1) 



efforts will be the annual May Day 
festival, an affair in which the Y. M. 
C. A. figures very prominently. Probably 
the most important annual task of this 
society is its freshmen week program, 
when a large delegation assists in orient- 
ing the new freshmen in the fall during 
that first hectic week in college. 

The nominees for the new staff are as 
follows : president, Curvin Thompson 
and Daniel Shearer ; vice president, Rob- 
ert Clippinger and Harlin Kinney ; treas- 
urer, Ernest Weirick and John Zettle- 
moyer ; secretary, Paul Horn and Chris- 
tian Walk ; pianist, John Miller. 



Seniors Annex Honors 
In Interclass League 

Kinney Stars As Seniors De- 
feat Sophs, 46-36, T o 
Ci nch Top Spot 



The 1937 Interclass Basketball Cham- 
pionship was captured by the seniors last 
Wednesday night when they outscored 
the last-place sophomore team 46-36. 
The seniors got an early lead and were 
never headed. The halftime score was 
20-12. Sharpshooter Charley Kinney 
took all the scoring honors with 14 points 
each half for a total of 28. The sopho- 
more scoring was well divided among the 
five performers with Roy Weidman's 

10 points making him high man. As a 
result of this victory the seniors ac- 
quired a two-game lead with only one 
game remaining for them to play- Bat- 
tle scars are being carried by both Char- 
ley Kinney and Bob Strayer in the form 

011 bandages over their left eyes. The 
Score : 

Seniors 

G. F. T. 

Kinney F 12 4 28 

Heisch F 102 

Lazin C 3 3 

Loose G 306 

Straub G 3 1 7 

19 8 46 
Sophomores 

G. F. T. 

Dempsey F 215 

Thomas F 237 

Silvers C 237 

Weidman G 5 10 

Strayer G 3 1 7 



LEBANON VALLEY WAA HOST 
TO CO ED FROM COLLEGES 



(Continued from page 1) 



Miss Martenis, of Allentown, has been 
Invited as guest official. Miss Aldworth, 
of West Chester, will observe the activi- 
ties of the day with the intention of lay- 
ing plans for the institution of a Play 
Day on the West Chester campus. The 
following coaches will also be present: 
Miss Haab, of Shippensburg, Miss Keed- 
cr, of Susquehanna, Miss Faist, of Al- 
bright, Miss Landis, of Cedar Crest, and 
Miss Kehfuss, of Dickinson. 



KALOZETEAN'S SHAPE PLANS 
FOR SIXTIETH ANNIVERSARY 



(Continued from page 1) 



unique as well as practical favor for 
the ladies. 

Every sail is set and Kalo is ready to 
make this anniversary, which marks its 
sixth decade of existence, the most prof- 
itable and enjoyable ever. • 

The cast of the anniversary play, "The 
Bishop Misbehaves," is rapidly polishing 
the rough spots in the performance and 
from all indications promise an enter- 
taining evening on March 19. 



14 



36 



PROGAM AND ITINERARY 

OF MEN'S BAND PLANNED 



(Continued from page 1) 



"Grasshopper's Dance" by Ernest Buc- 
calossi which is composed for piano and 
band together. And then we will be 
taken back to our childhood days by "A 
Childhood Fantasy" by Clifford Lillya. 
In this selection we hear everything from 
"Three Blind Mice" to "Chop Sticks." 

So far the band has definite concerts 
engaged in Millersburg and Harrisburg 
and prospective dates in Baltimore, 
Ephrata, Red Lion, York, and Waynes- 
boro. 




GOURD 
CALABASH PIPE 



JUDGE, MY UNCLE SENT ME A 
CALABASH PIPE, OUST LIKE YOURS 
AT FIRST I THOUGHT IT WAS A 
SAXOPHONE AND LOOKED FOR 
AN INSTRUCTION BOOK WITH 
THE SIX EASY LESSONS. 3UST 
WHAT AND WHY 
IS A CALABASH? 




THE WHAT 'OF A CALABASH 
PIPE IS A BOWL OF "THE AFRICAN 
BOTTLE GOURD WITH A MEERSCHAUM 
OR PORCELAIN INNER BOWL 
AND AN AMBER STEM 




THE WHY IS THE WAY THE CALABASH 
BOWL ABSORBS HEAT AND MAKES FOR 
- A COOL SMOKE — BUT, EVEN SO, 
THATS- ONLY HALF 
THE STORY — THE 
TOBACCO THAT GOES 
^^^WTl lNTO IT l<s EVEM 
MORE IMPORTANT 




YOU'RE TELLING ME / BEFORE I GOT L 
NEXT TO PR1NJCE ALBERT, I BLAMED 
MY PIPE FOR THE WAY MY TONGUE 
WAS ALWAYS BITING / CHANGING 
PIPES DIDN'T SOLVE IT BUT CHANGING 
TO MILD, TASTY'BlTELESS'PRlNCE 
ALBERT 
REALLY 
PUT ME 
ON THE 
JOY ROAD 



7y 



WELL,I SEE 
" CANT- 
TEACH YOU 
ANYTHING 
NEW ABOUT 
GOOD SMOK- 
ING 




PRINCE ALBERT 
MONEY-BACK GUARANTEE 
Smokt 20 fragrant pipWuis of 
Prince Albert. If yon don't find It the 
mellowest, tastiest pipe tobaeeo you 
ever smoked, return the pocket tia with 
tbe rest of the tobacco in it to as at any 
time within a month from this data, and 
we will refund full purchase price, plus 
postage. (Signed) R. J. Reynolds To- 
bacco Company, Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Copyright, 1037, R. J. Hajmold* Tobacco Company 



Fringe Albert 



THE NATIONAL 
JOY SMOKE 



4 



PAGE EIGHT 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 4, 1937 



AB 



razen 



Head 



. . . by art 
Which shall unfold strange doubts and 
aphorisms . . . 

— Greene 



Last Thursday the good and learned 
Friar remarked that I was covered witl 
a sort of greenish muck, which, when 
he removed it and analysed its vile 
smelling constituency, he was surprised 
to find consisting of nothing more than 
about a shovelful of the alluvium whicl 
is found in the quagmires of Grub 
iStreet, where all the hack writers are 
wont to gather. It has been found that 
the perpetrator is one ho who set up in 
the columning business last week dur- 
ing my illness, and is, in all appear 
a nee, deceiving himself with the esoteric 
notion that a sheet of foolscap is a prop 
er receptacle for the conveyance of mud 
Now, in sooth, I am learned in a number 
of branches, particularly necromancy 
geomancy, astrology, alchemy, and all 
the secret arts of the arcanum, but in 
none of them did I hear said that the 
product of the quagmire had any power 
either to charm or curse. 

• 

The Lo person of whom I have been 
speaking did me the honor to take up 
one full column in this publication in 
order that, like Heliogabulus, he might 
blacken the memory of his predecessor 
with the venal scribblings of literary 
panderers. I, however, shall not ac 
cord him a like honor, since he is cer 
tainly not worthy even the meager space 
I grant him, and the only effect of hL 
vile scrivenings was a slightly acidulous 
one that served only to brighten my 
brazen surfaces by its removal. 

• 

The Friar, howbeit, yet thinks I should 
speak some malefic thing which would 
silence forever by the awfulness of its 
example the envying pack of tellurium 
tradesmen of whom Villiann and Lo 
how appropriate those names, e'en 
though their owners are ignorant of the 
proper orthography — for being the 
greatest asses are in rerum natara, the 
chiefest representatives. 

• 

On that account, I hereby cast upon 
the puling malpractitioners hereinbefore 
referred to, the curse Borgia in reverse, 
which causes poisoners to swallow their 
own concoctments, the maleditcion tellus 
in ipso, whereby pig s are caused to 
drown in their own wallowing-place, 
and, worst of all, the impetus ad idiot'es 
which drives sane men mad by causing 
them to read their own work, and trans, 
forms such innocuous morons as be these 
into raving maniacs who must be cast 
into chains where only hellish tortures 
will silence their lurid outcries. The 
Friar says that, in sooth, they indeed 
are not now from that condition far 
removed, an observation which may not 
be so pertinent, since men say there 'n 
some little doubt as to whether the vic- 
tims of these curses are able to read; 
howsoever, I would venture it. 

• 

And now let us to pleasanter subjects 
of speculation, such as young Mr. Rob- 
ert Heckman, of whom it is reported 
that, at a recital last week, he success- 
fully introduced into the musick of 
Bach this latterday devising which 1 
believe men call swing. Mr. Heckman, 
it meseemeth, was playing a Bach score 
upon the grand organ, when by some 
misadventure he lost the tune, and pro- 
ceeded for several minutes to extempo- 
rise, until he could remember it again, 
at which time, he recommenced the piece 
and played it to great applause with no 
one being whit the wiser. 

• 

A friend of the Friar who has been 
here for some days now to consult with 
me upon the uses of the astrolabe re- 
marks that it is a strange thing how 
numerous are the faults a man can find 
in women, save only her of whom he is 
enamoured, whereupon I bethink myself 
of what the "drunken Stratford clown' 



deposes on this question, to wit, "For 
love is Llind, and lovers cannot see." 

Yet this leaves some little question in 
the balances, since, for my part, I can 
see no reason why love ought to be 
blind, to which the gentleman replied 
that, of course, you could not expect a 
head of brass to be knowing in such 
matters. This, indeed, may be the truth. 
And yet I know not. 

• 

And parfoy, as the Frenchman says, 
the Brazen Head ought to occupy him- 
self with more serious topics, and yet 
he fears that, like Gargantua under the 
care of the Sophisters, he might grow 
simple and blockish in learning" were 
lie always to occupy his time with such 
"mealy stuff." He is not oblivious, eith- 
er, to the fact that there are those, how- 
ever doltish in other respect, who are 
nevertheless such masters in the ars 
amoris as might make Daphne wish to 
run, though faster than Apollo, yet 
toward him. Fit this whom fit it may. 
• 

In closing I would warn my Grub 
Street contemporaries with the words 
of the poet Martial: 

Nil recitas et vis, namerce, poeta videri. 
Quicquid vis e'sto, dwrnmodo nil recitas 

which can be rendered 

So you wish to seem a poet, tJiough you 

aren't, well you know it? 
Well, you cam fool the public with your 

bluffing, if only you continue to 

write nothing. 



DR. HOWE VISITS CAMPUS 
CONFERS WITH STUDENTS 



(Continued from page 1) 



He insisted also that religion must be 
exposed to the truth, without reluctance 
or hesitation. The discourse was con- 
cluded by Dr. Howe's presentation oi 
what he considered to be the four chiet 
nenehts of true religion: what it ha^ 
uieant for civilization, what it his meant 
for the individauL the light it throws 
on the mysteries of life, and the power 
t gives of the mastery of life. 

Dr. Howe spent the remainder of the 
day in conference with individual stu- 
dents, especially those who are prepar- 
ing for the ministry. His visit to Leba- 
non Valley College was terminated with 
a Life Work Recruit Fellowship Hour, 
at which he was the guest speaker. This 
affair was held in the small dining room 
during the regular evening meal time, 
with the Life Work Recruits present. 
\ string trio, consisting of Dorothy 
Yeakel, Grace Geyer, and John Z,ettle- 
noyer, furnished excellent music for the 
ea.ly part of the dinner. At the conclu- 
sion of the meal, which was served in 
banquet style, El wood Needy, president 
of the organization, assumed charge of 
affairs and presented the various speak- 
ers and performers. Each of the senior 
members of the club — Claire Adams, 
Harold Beamesderfer, William Grosz, 
Louis Straub, and Flora Strayer gave 
hort talks. 

Faculty speakers were Dr. Richie and 
Dr. Butterwick, who elaborated briefly 
on several phases of Christian work. 
Dr. Clyde A. Lynch, in a short address, 
added his welcome of Dr. Howe to those 
previously expressed by the other speak- 
ers, and commented on the work of the 
Life Work Recruits. Dr. Wilt, pastor 
of the College Church, also gave a short 
md brief talk on the Christian chal- 
enge. 

After two musical numbers, a vocal 
solo by Rose Tschopp and a violin selec- 
tion by John Zettlemoyer, Dr. Howe was 
presented as the chief speaker. He em- 
ihasfcsed particularly the necessity of 
Capable students for theological work. 
"The Church," he said, "needs the vcrv 
best. And there is no field more chal- 
lenging than that of the Christian min- 
istry." 



Flying Dutchmen Defeat 
Bears In Listless Fray 

Coach Chief Metoxen's varsity drib- 
blers defeated the Ursinus quintet in a 
listless contest on the home court last 
week by a score of 41 to 38 before a 
small assemblage of fans. 

The Flying Dutchmen assumed a com- 
manding lead early in the fray and coast- 
ed to victory over the league cellar oc- 
cupants. The Bears rallied several times 
during the second half, but every time 
they threatened to take the lead the Val- 
ley passers countered with valuable two- 
pointers and the Hashagen clan never 
managed to close the gap. At one point 
they came within two counters of dead- 
locking the fray, but a revived L. V. C. 
attack again sent the Valleyites into a 
comfortable lead. 

Raymie Frey stole the spotlight with 
some sensational shooting to rack up 
nineteen points for the evening, with 
Kress, the Billett brothers, and Snell 
contributing the other scores for the 
Blue and White. 

Captain Paul Billett played an out- 
standing floor game for the victorious 
Valleyites and his capable guarding pre- 
vented opposing scores on numerous oc- 
casions. Clair Snell and Bob Brown also 
turned in neat floor work in the slow 
contest. 

Costello, husky Ursinus guard, was 
the leader of the passing attack of the 
Collegeville crew, with Gaumer and 
Lauer combining to rack up seventeen 
alien tallies on several sensational pokes 
in the closing half. The lineups : 
Lebanon Valley 

G. F. T. 

P. Billett F, G 2 1 s 

Kress F 3 3 9 

R. Billett F 306 

Frey C 9 1 *9 

Aungst C 000 

Snell G 1 o 2 

Brown G 000 

Totals 18 5 41 

Ursinus 

G. F. T. 

Edwards F 000 

Gaumer F 419 

Powers F 1 3 5 

Vaccaro F 124 

Tworzydlo C 204 

Costello G 146 

Worster G 1 2 

Bodley G 000 

Lauer G 328 

Totals 13 I 2 38 

Lebanon Valley 19 22—41 

Ursinus 13 25—38 



Community Concerts 

On Monday, March 8, the Vienna 
Boys' Choir will present a concert in 
the Lebanon High School auditorium. 

Next week the Barrere Little Sym- 
phony will appear in York. This con- 
cert is scheduled for Thursday, Mar. 
11. Both groups merit a large at- 
tendance of L. V. C. students. 



METOXEN COURT QUINTET 

DOWNED BY ST. JOSEPH 



(Continued from page 1) 



ALUMM NEWS 



Mr. and Mrs. Albert U. Beyerle, of 
Annville, recently announced the engage- 
ment of their daughter, Esther, '27, to 
H. Alonzo Keller, of Philadelphia. Miss 
Beyerle has been teaching in the high 
school in Pleasantville, N. J., since her 

graduation from Lebanon Valley. 

* * * 

William C. Evans, '19, was recently 
elected Superintendent of the Braddock 
public schools, the appointment going 
into effect the first of last month. Mr. 
Evans, who received his Master's Degree 
from (he University of Pittsburgh in 
1932, taught in the Braddock high school 
for ten years, was principal of the 
North Braddock school from 1929 to 
1086, and since that time has been prin- 
cipal of the Braddock high school. 

# « # 

T. Bayard Beatty, '05, who was head 
of the English Department at Lebanon 
Valley before Dr. Wallace, and who is 
now principal of the Radnor High 
School a1 Wayne, Pa., wrote an inter- 
esting article which is published in this 

month's Pennsylvania School Journal en- 
titled "Looking Backward and For- 
ward." In his article Mr. Beatty says 
that "the high school is a sleeping giant 
whose product will surprise the college 
of today." 



in Eastern basketball this year, was 
the center of the Hawk offense and dis- 
played a superb brand of ball-handling 
as the main factor in the fast-working at- 
tack of the St. Joe quintet. Guokas tal- 
lied eleven points to lead the Hawk scor- 
ing, with Captain McMenamin and Don 
Kenney trailing with ten and nine points. 

Captain Paul Billett was the outstand- 
ing performer for the Valleyites with 
seven field goals and one foul for fifteen 
points for the evening, while the whole 
L. V. C. outfit displayed an excellent 
brand of floor play in the fast contest- 

The lineups : 

Lebanon Valley 

G. F. T. 

R. Billett F 1 o 2 

Kress F 306 

Frey C 226 

P. Billett G, F 7 1 15 

Brown G 204 

Snell G 215 

Bachman G 000 

Totals 17 4 38 

St. Joseph's 

G. F. T. 

McMenamin F 5 o 10 

Smale F 306 

Langan F 102 

Guokas C 5 1 11 

D. Kenney G 419 

J. Kenney G 226 

Oakes G 102 

Totals 21 4 46 



The GREEN TERRACE 
Restaurant 

FULL COURSE DINNERS 

85c 

Banquets and Parties Solicited 
Phone Annville — 130 



For School Supplies and 
Books of all Kinds Go To: 

BOLLMAN'S 

628 Cumberland Street 
LEBANON, PA. 




D.L.SAYL0R$ 
SONS 

Contractors 
Lumber and Coal 

ANNVILLE, PENNA 



KREAMER BROS. 

Furniture 
Floor Coverings 
Electric Refrigerators 
Hoover Electric Sweep ers 
Electric Washing Machi neg 

RCA Radios 
FUNERAL DIRECTORS 
Phone 144 ANNVILLE, p A 



John Hirsh Dept. S/ orc 

Men's Leather and Wool Jacket 
Wool Mackinaws 
Weytnberg Shoes 
Phone 145 9-11 W. Main St 

ANNVILLE, PA. 



Sip a Soda 



at 



Diehl's Drug Store 

Why not take advantage of the many 
services we offer. 



Meals Served Daily 

Best Sundaes in Town with 
Home Made Ice Cream 
Sandwiches, Cigarette!, Ctndy 

C. D. BRUNNER 

E. Main St. ANNVILLE, PA 



Complete Your Food 
Supply For That Midnight 
Lunch By Stopping At 

FINK'S BAKERY 



We sell all types of baked pro^ 
at all hours. 



CLOTHING OF Q U A L I T y 

J. S. BASHORE 

Lebanon . 





'Start the day 

In the Modern way. 

Breakfast at the PennW»y 



THE PENNWAY HOTEL 



Vo 

Fa 

D 
In 



T 

of : 

urd; 
tel, 
the 
F 
Eas 
iert 
to t 
esjx 
ins 
relii 
and 
feet 
soci 
tion 
coll 
nan 
ere; 

Cull 

aspi 
terp 
nan 
T 
sess 
pres 
siuii 
Rev 
low 

the 
ley 
higl 
bra 
sigl 
tent 
strc 



V; 

T( 
L 



to 
Sat 
I'er 
six 



'I 

'ftei 

the 
Poo 
* c 

to 



22, 
I 



4 



Senior Dance 
Friday 



Support Benefit 
Movies 



i 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



Vol. xiii 



ANNVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA, THURSDAY, MARCH 11, 1937 



No. 24 



faculty Conference 
Meets At Harrisburg 

d r. LYNCH PRESIDES 

Intercollegiate Religious Acti- 
vities, Chapel vs. The Stu- 
dent Discussed 

The Tenth Annual Faculty Conference 
f Eastern Pennsylvania was held Sat- 
urday, March 6, in the Penn-Harris Ho- 
tel Harrisburg, under the auspices of 
the State Y. • M. C. A. of Pennsylvania. 

Faculty members from colleges of 
Eastern Pennsylvania attended this con- 
ference to endeavor to find an answer 
to the question — "What are the colleges, 
especially their teachers of religion, do- 
ing to meet the demands of students that 
religion be made co-extensive with life, 
and that it be made the dynamic to ef- 
fect the spiritual reconstruction of the 
social order?" In answer to this ques- 
tion the aim of the religious leaders in 
collegiate work was definitely voiced, 
namely, that the college must try to 
create a much needed synthesis that will 
combine the individual and the social 
aspects of the gospel in an adequate in- 
terpretation and expression of the Chris- 
tian message. 

The conference was divided into three 
sessions, over which Dr. Clyde A. Lynch 
presided as chairman. The morning ses- 
sion opened with devotions conducted by 
Rev. Win. C. Wilt, College pastor, fol- 
lowed by an address on "Evangelism and 
the Student" delivered by Dr. E. Stan- 
ley Jones, of India— this talk was the 
high spot of the conference, Dr. Jones' 
broad experience has given him keen in- 
sight into student problems and the con- 
tent and sincerity of his address appealed 
strongly to his audience- This session 
{Continued on Page 2, Column 1) 



Varsity Five Loses 
Court League Final 

T ALBRIGHT'S LIONS 

kV. C. Concludes Session In 
Third Place Tie With Muh- 
lenberg 



the^^ 11011 Valle y' s courtsters dropped 
l Jf' league contest of the season 
|v Wright's Lions on the home court 



IW? 7 night and concluded Easten 
League activity with a mark o; 
i and six losses to deadlock Muh 
f or third place in the final rat 

n le ^ e ( Ll0ns showed marked improve 



lenb 



te t at °[ Cr their P la y in the first encoun- 
th e PN . Cadin S several weeks ago, while 
Poor, 



'e T?i ^ 

>' ln g Dutchmen displayed their 
cIosp t>^°k °^ ^ e 86118011 in dropping 



•est 



^luCf 33 ~ 30 decisi °n to their Red and 
to Ig ° es - Lebanon Valley held an 18 

v the A v ,r tage at 

the halfway mark, 
'ead af lbri ght passers forged into the 

Sec ° n <l liV eVen minutes of Play in tl,e 
Ho plat a 11 was Captain Uill Becker 

^ and !? the Uons in the * ead at 23- 



I 



8^ hereafter the Red 



mil Wliile 



Us K WaS neve r headed 
P' 

.(1 (j » "iitiise ana a goon 

hit e stJ! nSiVely ag!li,,st the Blue and 



is 

Point X Starred fw the victors with 
° r cl f W °. n the "flense and a good 



So Phon u 



Wh"iT ore center ' Uu y ,nie Fre y- 

( ^i«LV° dpht I)oi,,ts durin « the 
med on Page 3, Colwnm 1) 



Lynch' s Hosts To Juniors 

The Juniors were entertained at tea 
at the home of President and Mrs. 
Lynch on Wednesday, March 3, from 
3 :30 until 5 -3° o'clock . The Fresh- 
men, class cousins of the Juniors, en- 
tertained and served. Louise Saylor, 
Kathryn Zwally and Evelyn Seylor 
were those who served, while Mrs. 
Butterwick and Miss Gillespie poured. 
The entertainment included a trom- 
bone solo by Phil Lester, a vocal se- 
lection by Jean Schack, and a violin 
solo by Mary Ann Catroneo. Tea or 
cocoa, cakes and cookies, dainty sand- 
wiches, and candy were served the 
groups of Juniors who arrived from 
time to time. 



Diversified Program 
Planned by Glee Club 

Rutledge Directs Singers In 
Series of Unusual Selec- 
tions 



Ranging all the way from the most 
profound chorale of Bach to the lilting 
melodies of light opera, this year's glee 
club program is outstanding in variety 
and interest. The glee club, under the 
direction of Professor Rutledge, is busy 
putting on the finishing touches for the 
se,i son's concerts, sonic numbers of which 
are reviewed below. 

The Passion Chorale of Bach, "() Sa- 
cred Head, Now Wounded", is presented 
in a new arrangement by F. Melius 
Christiansen, who is the director of the 
school of music at St. Olaf College. The 
superb harmonization of the immortal 
Bach has not been sacrificed, but rather 
enhanced in this work from the pen of 
Christiansen. 

A selection which has been dealt with 
similarly is the hymn, "Praise to the 
Lord", the words of which were written 
in German in 1680 and the tune in 1685. 
Christiansen is also the arranger^f this 
composition. 

Another sacred number of excellence 
is one entitled "As By the Streams of 
Babylon". In this .selection a soprano 
obligato is sung to a humming accom- 
(Continued on Page 2, Column 5) 



Delphians To Sponsor 
Movies At Local Theater 



Delphian Literary Society will spon- 
sor two benefit movies at the Astor 
Theatre four nights of next week- On 
March 15 and 16 "Champagne Waltz" 
will be presented and "Charlie Chan at 
the Opera" on March 17 and 18. 

The background of "Champagne 
Waltz" is Vienna. Miss Swarthout and 
her grandfather (Fritz Lciber), a de- 
scendant of the famous Johann Strauss, 
conduct a waltz palace which is fre- 
quented by the best people. They become 
annoyed when Jack Oakie, the publicity 
agent for Bing, a cafe owner, engages 
I n il MacMurray and his jazz orchestra. 
The jazz orchestra becomes so famous 
that Miss Swarthout and her grand- 
father are forced out of business. She 
goes to the American Consul's office to 
complain. There she meets MacMurray 
and mistaking him for the consul pours 
{Continued on Page 3, Column 3) 



Lebanon Valley Y. W. 
Entertains Mothers 

MORE THAN FIFTY HERE 

Teas, Music, Play Day Pro- 
gram, Provide Entertain- 
ment For Proud* Parents 

Mothers have arrived and left and 
L. V. C. campus has resumed its studious 
week-day atmosphere. The past week-end 
proved a period of general excitement 
for the girls who were entertaining their 
mothers and showing them how their 
daughters live. Some of the mothers ar- 
rived Friday evening and attended the 
Clionian meeting in Clio Hall. An in- 
teresting program, several entertaining 
games, and refreshments were enjoyed 
by mothers and daughters alike. Satur- 
day morning more mothers arrived and 
were taken on tours of inspection of 
the campus, and to watch the basketball 
games which were part of Lebanon Val- 
ley's Play Day program. They returned 
to the dormitory and following dinner 
went to the chapel for moving pictures 
on basketball technique to help them 
better understand the game. The after- 
noon was spent in socializing, meeting 
other mothers, and seeing more of the 
Play Day games. 

A specially planne banquet climaxed 
the day's activities. The tables were 
decorated with green borders, flowers, 
and candles, and there were large sil- 
houettes on the walls representing mo- 
thers and daughters- The meal was de- 
licious and proof of the chef's most en- 
thusiastic endeavors. Entertainment was 
presented by Mary Ann Catroneo who 
played her violin, and Virginia Neissner 
who sang several songs. At the conclu- 
sion of the banquet Gayle Mountz led in 
group singing which everyone enjoyed. 
In the evening the varsity basketball 
game between L. V. and Albright fur- 

(Contiwaed on page 4, Column 3) 



Women Debate Ursinus 



The Ursinus College Women's De- 
bating Association met the Lebanon 
Valley Association in a dual debate 
last Wednesday, March 4. On our 
campus, an affirmative team consisting 
of Katharine Williams and Roberta 
Byron met Theresa Stefan and Belle 
Mulhollen, the Lebanon Valley nega- 
tive team to debate the forensic ques- 
tion. Agnes Morris acted as chair- 
man of the debate, which was held 
in Delphian Hall. 

The affirmative team from Lebanon 
Valley traveled to Ursinus, and from 
there to Norristown High School, 
where the debate was held in the af- 
ternoon before the high school stud- 
ents. Jean Harnish and Hazel Hemin- 
way spoke representing L. V. C. 

Both debates were non-decision. 



] 



unwr Class Plans For 
Bigger and Better Prom 



The Junior class has undertaken the 
task of planning a bigger and better 
Junior Prom on May 14. President Ul- 
rich has appointed the following com- 
mittees: General Committee — Betty 
Bender, Chairman, Ernestine Jagnesak, 
Lucille Maberry, Adolph Capka, David 
Bverly, John Marberger. Program Com- 
mittee' — Lucille Maberry, Chairman, Em- 
ily Kindt, Christine Yoder, Calvin Spit- 
ler, Roger Saylor. Arrangements Com- 
mittee — John Groff, Chairman, Adolph 
Capka, Carolyn Roberts, Sylva Harcle- 
rode, Lena Risser. 

So far Hie class has decided upon a 
maximum of $250 for the orchestra, and 
one dollar per person admission. The 
dance will be held, as precedent has de- 
termined, in the Ilershey Ballroom. In- 
vitations will be mailed to all faculty 
members, some of whom shall be invited 
as chaperons. The admission price is 
less this year than formerly and the 
orchestra will be of the highest caliber 
ever heard at Lebanon Valley College 
affairs. Because no advertising is al- 
lowed, each student will be permitted to 
bring guests. Also, all those who sell 
fifteen tickets will receive an individual 
ticket as bonus. A large turnout is ex- 
pected. 



Wagner College, N. Y. U. 
On Debating Schedule 

Teams Meet Lincoln and Ur- 
sinus In No-decision Con- 
tests 



On Monday night the men's affirma- 
tive team of the Lebanon V alley Debat- 
ing Association, composed of Curvin 
Thompson and William Clark, met the 
Lincoln University negative team on the 
subject of maximum hours and minimum 
wages. Dr. Black was chairman of the 
debate which was carried on in the Ox- 
ford style. As usual, no decision was 
rendered. At the same time, the negative 
team comprising Charles Kinney and 
Carl Ehrhart travelled to Lincoln Uni- 
versity to meet the affirmative team of 
that school. In this debate, in which the 
Oregon style was used, the no-decision 
principle also prevailed. 

Yesterday afternoon the affirmative 
team argued the same question at Col- 
legeville with the negative team of Ursi- 
nus. William Clark and Calvin Spitler 
represented Lebanon Valley in this de- 
bate. 

A negative composed of Boyd Shaffer 
and Charles Kinney left this morning 
for New York on a northern tour. They 
will debate with Wagner Memorial Col- 
lege, Staten Island, tonight. Tomorrow, 
they meet the New York University at 
Washington Square College. 



Christian Reformers 

Discussed by L. W. R. 

Last Monday evening in North Hall 
Parlor the Life Work Recruit organi- 
zation held their weekly meeting. Auclrie 
Fox was in charge of the meeting and 
conducted the devotions. Hose Tschopp 
very inspiringly vocalized "My Task." 
Her accompanist was Dorothy Yeakel. 

The main feature of this meeting was 
an informal discussion on the subject, 
To WhM Extent Should We as Chris- 
tiam Be Reformers? Thomas Guinivan 
and Edith Metzger gave short speeches 
on the topic of the evening with the 
purpose of stimulating the informal dis- 
cussion that followed. After serious con- 
templation on the topic and on the 
thoughts presented by the speakers, the 
members whole-heartedly contributed to 
the animated discussion* of some of the 
most important problems facing the 
Christian youth of this present day. In 
(Continued on Page 3, Column 1) 



First L V. Play Day 
Pronounced Success 

W. A. A. FETES GUESTS 



Fifty-five Women From Four 
Neighboring Colleges Parti- 
cipate In Events 



Last Saturday witnessed the beginning 
of what promises to be a new custom on 
the Lebanon Valley Campus. Under the 
guidance of Miss Esther Henderson, 
coach of women's athletics, the girls of 
Lebanon Valley's, youngest campus or- 
ganization, the Women's Athletic Asso- 
ciation, were hostessees to approximately 
55 basketball players and coaches of 
"our neighboring colleges. 

Shortly after 9:30 the guest coaches 
Mid players beagn to arrive and were 
•onducted to the local high school build- 
ing where the program for the day was 
■entered. Because the team from Al- 
bright did not arrive, Miss Henderson 
was forced to^call out a second L. V. C. 
team at the last minute to round out the 
orogram. 

Three ten minute games were played, 
consisting of two five minute periods. 
For these games opponents were chosen 
by lot. This enabled the coaches to judge 
the relative ability of the teams and thus 
U> cttottse opponents for the full length 
games which were evenly matched in 
ability. 

Lebanon Valley's first team played the 
first short game with Dickinson and de- 
feated them 12-0; Shippensburg and 
Cedar Crest tied their score 5-5 ; and 
Susquehanna defeated L. V.'s second 
team 7-4. 

Before playing the full length games, 
all of the players got together in a round 
table discussion from which coaches 
were excluded. Eleanor Lynch was asked 
to preside, and the girls brought up ques- 
tions of rules which they did not fully 
understand or which they wanted modi- 
fied or changed. Because of the late hour 
the first full length game, which was 
supposed to be played in the morning, 
was postponed until after lunch. 

Blue crepe paper, yellow candles, sweet 
peas and daisies, and college pennants, to- 
gether with the colorful gum-drop bas- 
ketball players which served as favors — 
all of these due to the artistic fingers of 
Louise Stoner and her helpers — trans- 
formed the small dining-room into a 
charming banquet hall. 

After lunch the women went to the 
chapel where movies on "Basketball 
Technique" were shown. 

Returning to the high school, the full 
time games were played. Lebanon Val- 
ley's first team defeated Cedar Crest 40- 
17; and Shippensburg defeated Susque- 
hanna 33~ 21 - Before the last game was 
played Miss Mayer, assisted by Miss 
Gollam (both National officials) gave an 
(Continued on Page 3, Column 5) 



Senior Dance Friday 

The Senior Class will sponsor a 
college dance in the Alumni gymna- 
sium tomorrow night. Ed Schmidt, 
chairman of the dance committee, 
said in an interview today, "We've 
got plenty of the latest transcriptions 
by all of the famous orchestras and 
the best amplifying device obtainable." 

The dance will start at 8:15. Ad- 
mission is twenty-five cents a couple. 



* 



I 



PAGE TWO 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 



937 



ESTABLISHED 1925 
A weekly publication by the Undergraduate S tudents of Lebanon Valley College 

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 
Richard A. Baus, '37 
MANAGING EDITOR ASSOCIATE EDITORS 

Edgar Messersmith, '37 William H. Earnest, '37 

ASSISTANT Louis E . straub, '37 

Boyd Shaffer, '38 

EDITORIAL BOARD 
SPORTS EDITOR FEATURE EDITOR 

William H. Earnest, '37 Louise Stoner, '38 

REPORTORIAL STAFF 

Robert Clippinger, '39 Conskrvatoky 

Duey Unger, '37 - - Kalozetan 

Alice Richie, '39 Delphian 

Kenneth Eastland, '37 Philokosmiax 

Grace Naugle, '37 - -Xuoniak 

Harold Beamesderfer, '37 Ernestine Jagnesak, '38 

Karl Flocken, '37 Wanda Price, '38 

Eleanor Lynch, '37 Calvin Spitler, '38 

Harold Phillips, '37 Theresa Stefan, '38 

Clifford Barnhart, '38 William Clark, '39 

Elizabeth Bender, '38 Thomas Guinivan, '39 

Sylva Harclerode, '38 Robert Long, '39 

Samuel Rutter, '39 

BUSINESS BOARD 
BUSINESS MANAGER CIRCULATION MANAGER 

Robert Kell, '37 Elwood Needy, '37 

ASSISTANT ASSISTANT 
Curvin Dellinger, '38 Ernest Weirick, '39 

Single Copies 5 cents 

Subscription U-UU per year 

Entered at the Annville, Pa., post office as second class matter, under the Act of 
March 3, 1879. . „ , 

Publighed weekly through the school year, except during holiday vacation and 
examination week. 

RK PRC VENTED FOR NATIONAL. AU Vttrt I l«INO BY 

National Advertising Service, Inc. 

College FubHthers Repreunlethe < 
420 Madison Ave. New York. N.Y. 
chicaoo • Boston . ban francisco 
los ansblss • portland • seattle 



Vol. XIII 



THURSDAY, MARCH II, 1937 



No. 24 



DEAD WOOD 



The attitude taken by many students toward campus organizations is in no 
respect what it should be. To many the functions of the various clubs and societies 
mean nothing at all. Of course we can not criticize any individual for such an atti- 
tude if he is not interested in holding membership in a particular organization. 

ihe subject of our brief discourse is that group of students who become mem- 
bers and in some cases even become elected to responsible offices and then forget 
what their duties are. 

The extra-curricular activities, among which the clubs and societies play an 
important part, serve to take the student away from the monotony of text-books 
and lectures, and enable him to expand his mental activity into other fields and to 
widen his knowledge in those things which are not reviewed in the regular college 
course. That was the purpose of establishing a program of extra-curricular acti- 
vities, and it should become the subject of close observation and thought by each 
student. 

Many individuals, in all sincerity, declare their intentions of becoming mem- 
bers of a ecrtain organization. They join and they promise to do all they can to 
further the development of the particular club. However, when they are called 
upon to participate in programs they always have other things to do. As a result 
meetings are postponed indefinitely and in at least two cases, organizations which 
were active up to the present scholastic year have met only once this term- and 
that sole meeting for the purpose of organization and election of officers. 

We regret not a little the demoralization of both the Readers' and Chemistry 
Clubs — these two clubs heretofore representing considerable influence in Lebanon 
Valley's extra-curricular program. 

At present there are at least twelve clubs and organizations on our campus. 
Naturally, one can not hope to participate in all of these and, in fact, it is impos- 
sible since the interests of various organizations are so different. There are, how- 
ever, a number in which one student may be interested and it is here where the 
difficulty arises. Before he decides definitely to become a member in any one or 
more of these clubs, he should first of all see whether he can devote sufficient time 
and effort to that club. 

The great trouble is that many students like to attach a long list of activities 
to their names and then forget what their duties are. This is a wrong attitude and 
tends to lessen the prestige and influence that the organization may exert. 

We sincerely hope that no other campus organizations will go the way of the 
Readers' and Chemistry Clubs. We also wish that these two clubs will be revived 
before Lebanon Valley entirely forgets about them. 



FACULTY CONFERENCE 

MEET AT HARRISBURG 
(Continued from page 1) 



was closed by two periods of discussion, 
the first led by Dr. Hanson, President of 
Gettysburg College, on the topic, "Mak- 
ing the Chapel Service Vital," and the 
second, "Intercollegiate Religious Activi- 
ties", conducted by Pres. Lynch. The 
luncheon period was featured by an in- 
teresting round table discussion under 
the guidance of Dr. Jones. In the after- 



noon Dr. J. Gould Wickey, Washington, 
D. C, chairman of the Board of Church 
Related Colleges and Secretary of the 
Board of Christian Education of the 
Lutheran Church, spoke on the subject, 
"The Proposed Mission to Students." 

The conference was well attended by 
our male faculty members including 
Prof. Gri mm, Drs. Lynch, Stevenson, 
Wallace, St ruble, Black, Derickson, 
Light, Slunk, Stonecipher, Butterwick, 
and Richie, and Rev. Wilt. 



President Lynch' s Activities 

March S Meeting of the Philadel- 
phia Alumni. 

March 6 — Presided at the Annual 
V. M. C. A. Faculty Conference 
at Harrisburg. 

March 7 — Educational Address at 
Silver Spring 1'. B. Church. 

March 16 Will speak in the New- 
burg V. B. Church. 



ALUMNI NOTES 



In the Dec. 31 issue of Copeia was 
printed an article by Earl E. Hoover, 
'34, entitled "Contributions to the Life 
History of the Chinook and Landlocked 
Salmon in New Hampshire." The li- 
brary has recently obtained a copy of 
the article reprinted in pamphlet form. 



* # * 



Blanche Cochran, '30, of Gap, Penna., 
received the Master of Science in Educa- 
tion degree at the University of Penna. 
last month. 

* # * 

On June 25, 1936, Eulalie N. Morton, 
'32, was married to Donald Strawbridge 
of York. Her attendants were Mrs. 
Violet Morton Kehn, ex. '31, and Miss 
Ruth Coble, '33. 

* * * 

Mrs. Althea Fink Merrick, '83, died 
on Feb. 27, 1937, at her home in Coral 
Gables, Florida. After her graduation 
from L. V. C, Mrs. Merrick was placed 
in charge of the department of fine arts 
here for two years- She then married 
Solomon G. Merrick, '83, a minister, and 
in a few years they had to move to 
Florida for Mr. Merrick's health. Mr. 
and Mrs. Merrick founded Coral Gables, 
and their son, George E. Merrick, de- 
veloped it into a model city which com- 
manded international attention as such 
and became, financially, one of the great- 
est real estate developments of history. 
Mrs. Merrick was largely instrumental 

in founding the University of Miami. 

* » • 

Approximately sixty alumni and guests 
were present at the meeting and dinner of 
L. V. C. Alumni of Philadelphia and 
vicinity which was held in the dining- 
room of the North Broad Street Sta- 
tion of the Reading Railroad last Fri- 
day night. Drs. Lynch and Shenk rep- 
resented the college, and conservatory 
students presented a musical program. 

At the business meeting the following 
officers were elected: Faber E. Stengle, 
'15, President; Ellen Moyer Garber, 
'17, Vice President; Mary Rank Hain, 
'30, Treasurer; Cawley Stine, '20, Sec- 
retary; and Dr. Ruben Williams, '17, 
member of the Alumni Council. 

Miss Emma Madciff, '27, of the fa- 
culty of Pfeiffer Junior College at Meis- 
enheimer, N. C, and Newton M. Burg- 
ner, '32, of the Lebanon High School 
faculty, received their A. M. degrees 
from the University of Pennsylvania 
this month. 

* * * 

Mr. Harry F. Stauffer, '05, of New- 
ark, N. J., died last week. Mr. Stauffer 
was principal of the South Annville 
High School from 1886 to 1890 and 
later he was principal of the Franklin 
School in Newark, from which position, 
however, he was retired before his death. 

* * * 

Carroll Dougherty, '21, now professor 
of economics of the University of Pitts- 
burgh, is co-author of a research work 
released Monday in respect to the rela- 
tion of employers and employees in the 
steel industry. The work recommends 
vertical industrial unionization of work- 
ers, collective bargaining on a rational 
basis, and a federal Inquiry of the steel 
business. Co-authors with Dr. Dougherty 
were Dr. Melvin (i. de Chazeau, associ- 
ate professor of commerce, University 
of Virginia, and Dr. Samuel S. Strat- 
ton, associate professor of business eco- 
nomics, Harvard University. The re- 
search work was conducted under the 
auspices of the Bureau of Business Re- 
search of the University of Pittsburgh. 



Student Theme 

LET S SWING IT 

By JANE EBY 

Sensation-crazy, young America has 
crashed through to the front again! Af- 
ter careening through a brief, bewil- 
dering seige of "knock-knocks", "ban- 
dies", animated cartoons, and other typ- 
ical American innovations, we have 
landed right side up and have been diz- 
zily and point-blank confronted by our 
newest and but lately recognized brain- 
child, Swing. 

At present most of us, having found 
our tongues, are demanding, "Just what 
is swing? Where did it originate? Is it 
here to stay?" And snapped right back 
from seasoned lovers of Brahms and 
Beethoven is the indignant reply that 
it is low and vulgar, the invention and 
plaything of lunatic intellects, and can- 
not possibly survive in decent society. 

Perhaps the first inkling the general 
public has had of a transition in popu- 
lar music from the choppy jazz of the 
twenties to something smooth and subtle, 
came around Christmas, 1935, with the 
advent of a new song called "The Music 
Goes 'Round and Around." It had 
"something different with a something 
new", to quote "Papa Tree Top Tall", 
that was irresistably inducive to hum- 
ming or beating out the melody at odd 
times, in addition to a capacity for ad- 
mitting improvisation, at which the am- 
ateur swingster would become vastly 
pleased with himself. This improvisa- 
tion is the main element in swing. 

But this was only the beginning of 
the popular awareness and acceptance 
of a new and distinctive style launched 
by a cult of band men back around 1905. 
Their tempo was ragtime and they at- 
tacked and, incidentally, made immortal, 
such swing classics as "Livery Stable 
Blues", "Dark Town Strutters' Ball", 
"Tiger Rag", and "Some of These 
Days." Chief among these early expo- 
nents of swing were the renowned five 
who called themselves "The Original 
Dixieland Jazz Band." Armed with 
trumpet, clarinet, trombone, drums, and 
piano they flashed in a subdued blaze 
of rhythm from New Orleans to Boston 
and finally died out in the Bohemian 
section of Paris whence they had been 
lured by promise of rich pecuniary re- 
gard, which was, however, not forth- 
coming. In deepest reverence to their 
memory, someone recently composed a 
s.ving number unnamed but expressively 
beginning, "\Ja Ever Hear the Story 
of the Dixieland Band?" 

Unfortunately for America, with the 
advent of the "Flaming Youth" and 
"Flapper" Era after the Great War, 
came jazz, today as offensive and out- 
moded as the short skirts and boy bobs 
that accompanied that period. Sob sis- 
ters and gigolos wailed blues songs to 
the skies, and Jolson inspired women 
to tears with his vitaphone recordings 
of "mammy" songs. But this was not 
swing. 

Then out of a clear sky hurtled 
"'Hound and Around." Its effect was 
e'ectric. People, particularly those who 
danced, declared, "It's got something 
there!" And assured was the future of 
the style begun by the Dixielanders and 
never discontinued by the boys in Har- 
lem. That rhythm-mad dark town be- 
came the mecca for all swingsters, and 
out of it radiated such steps as the 
"Lindy Hop" and "Trucking," incidental 
with the low and hot rhythms of 
"Stomping at the Savoy", "Mr. Ghost 
Goes to Town", "Organ Grinder's 
Swing", "Chritsopher Columbus", and 
"Swing, Swing, Dear Mother-in-Law." 

As above slated, these typical swing 
songs have one element in common: they 
are "low and hot." True swing bands 
play them in a subdued tone, insinuating 
the rhythm by a certain artistic synco- 
pation rather than blaring it out. And, 
more important, they can be improvised 
upon, which is the distinctive feature 



any good swing band can take auy 
tage of. "Stock arrangements" are atu 
Swing men play from memory 

n 

Ing harmoniously in a sort of tel 



Out, 

a note of music, instinctively imp ro °!^ 



„ e Path y 

In their jargon they remember a . 
lick and play around with it." ^ °* 
swing tunes have encouraged new ^ 
steps because they must be felt by 
body, not heard by the ear, as was 
That mercifully deceased rhythm 
was it rhythm?) could be played 
audiences in auditoriums by niaest/" 
Bernie, Whiteman, and Lopez, who ° S 
cou raged technical flights which 
too disciplined and mechanized, but in ^ 
gine swing in any other place than 
smoke-hazy night club or sophistics * 
hotel ballroom infused with the shuffl. 
of dancing feet. 

Artists who swing for the amusement 
they can derive personally, sometim 
gather in an unknown dive for a "j aill 
session." There they play without 
sheet of music all the hottest tunes, one 
man assuming the lead, the others a' 
companying him. Never do they pi ay 
one number exactly the same twice 
Their "mugging light," or playing SO ft| 
staccato swing, and "mugging heavy 
or the same with a heavier - beat, pop u 
larized a novel swing song, "I'se a-Mug- 
ging", although few laymen who howled 
lustily through its "boom da-de-a-da" 
realized they were dabbling in the vo- 
cabulary of swing masters. 

An explanation of swing would be in- 
complete without mention of its re. 
nowned maestros, so here's to Benny 
Goodman and his clariet, Cab Callo- 
and his hi-de-hi, Fletcher Henderson 
and his "mazzy" arrangements, Louie 
Armstrong and his trumpet, Tommy 
Dorsey, Hal Kemp, and "Stuff" Smith. 
And success to Swing, the infant enter- 
prise of our streamline era. 



nee 



L. V. C. Chem Department 
Presented With ExHUt 



The Kendall Refining Company of 
Bradford, Pennsylvania, recently pre- 
sented to the Chemistry Department an 
exhibit consisting of a framed blue 
print 28 x 30 inches showing the oper- 
ations in producing the numerous prod- 
ucts obtained from petroleum. Over 50 
specimens are included in the exhibit, 
which is similar to one placed in the 
State Museum at Harrisburg by the 
same company. 

The Department of Geology of the 
State of Georgia also made a gift of W 
specimens of ores and minerals repre- 
senting all deposits of economic and geo- 
logical importance in that state. 



DIVERSIFIED PROGRAM 

PLANNED BY GLEE CLUB 



(Continued from page 1) 



paniment by the chorus. The text 
this number was taken from Caoipi* 118 
' First Book of Ayres" written in l fil3. 
An unusual number is a Cossack lu^' 
by. The copy bears the notation that e 
voice, leading was derived from the 
sian guitar and balalaika accomp an 
ment. 

One of the choice bits on the pr°S ra " 



is a selection "Two Kings 



in 



hich 

words of sixteenth century origin 

The ch° r ' 

set to music by Joseph Clokey. a 

-th fa' lfa 

us parts are interspersed witn ^ 

figures played by two trumpets an 

trombones. ^ 

In more modern vein is t" e a. 

Herb ert 

Street Song" from Victor 

"Naughty Marietta". Other seleC rfivC 

which will undoubtedly pr° ve 3 ^ 

are "All in the April Evening"' bJ f 
„ . the sty le , 
erton, "Dark Water", in tne a „o 

, ..Tjii ]iin ieS ' 
the negro spiritual, by « 111 kIl0 \Vi> 



best 



jstle 

point 
ok« 



cut tl 
field 



and 

of ft 
13-10 
chant 
the fi 
rena" 
but I 
anon 
Billet 
1 tw< 
long 
15 as 
Su< 
llalpl 
inand 
sumei 
eight 
at 28 
a Ion 
off 01 
on ai 
regist 
shot, 
at 23- 



utes 1 
byT< 
brouj! 
Brow 



perso 
argue 
score 
jo. E 
to gr 
thirty 
two-p 
score 
The 



It. B 
Prey, 

Brow 
T 



becke 
B onn ( 
T «id 

Comb 
Knox, 
% 

k 



T 

% 



s 



number by one of the ^ 



American composers, 



Felix 



X 



entitled "Winter and Spring- 



4 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 11, 1937 



11 Apr '3? 

PAGE THREE 



nent 
inies 
jam 
it a 
one 
ae- 
play 
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„ t tY FIVE LOSES' 
VA^ COURT LEAGUE FINAL 

(Continued from page 1) 

The play °f the Valleyites was 
^"'"k throughout most of the game, 
ul 13iH ett particularly displayed 
y ic type of play far below his 
*' [s tandard. 

(f"* p r0 wn opened the scoring with a 

^{rom tlie fifteen-foot line, and long 
r b y Clair Snell and Raymie Frey 
r the Valleyites a live-point advan- 
2" ve . t j, e opening moments of play, 
on a follow-up and Knox on a 
* ne-bflnded shot from side-court 
] e;lt i to one point, but Snell again 

s the cords on a long shot to bring 
V unt to 7-4- Ri ffle " nd Kress traded 

"id goals, Les Knox counting a pivot 
" f . to bring the score to 9-8. Brown 
''Toslisl° each netted long set shots 
a " p re y followed a shot from the hands 
Jflalph Billett to change the count to 
jq Brown converted one of two foul 
,^es, and Tony Troisi counted from 
J* field after a quick dribble. De Lo- 
renzo scored a singleton for Albright, 
tat Frey counted from in close as Leb- 

non Valley assumed a 16-13 lead. Ralph 
Billett dribbled away from his man for 

two-pointer, Treida retaliating with a 
Jong field goal to bring the tally to 18- 
,3 as the half ended. 

Successive field goals by Paul and 
Halph Billett sent L. V. C. into a com- 
nanding 22-15 lead as action was re- 
ined, but Albright rallied to score 
eieht straight points and assume the lead 
at 23-22. Oslislo opened the rally with 
, long floor shot, Riffle converted a pair 
of foul chances, Knox counted two points 
on another pivot play, and Bill Becker 
registered a field goal on a follow-up 
shot. Raymie Frey deadlocked the count 
at 23-all on a single free toss, and Knox 
registered a long field goal as the Lions 
again went into the van, with eight min- 
utes of play remaining. Two floor pokes 
by Tony Troisi and a foul goal by Frey 
brought the score to 29-24. Oslislo and 
Brown counted from the field as the 
timekeepers reported four minutes of 
play remaining. Paul Billett counted a 
personal foul and a technical called on 
argumentative Tony Troisi, and the 
score stood at 31-28 with two minutes to 
go. Becker and Knox counted foul goals 
to give Albright a five-point edge with 
thirty seconds to go, and Paul Biilett's 
two-pointer from sidecourt brought the 
score to 33-30, the final figures. 

The lineups: 

LEBANON VALLEY 

O. F. T. 

p . Billett, f 2 2 

Kr «8s, f. _ i o 2 

1 Billett, f 2 4 

Fre )-. c 3 2 8 

■Hg 2 4 

Bro *n, g 2 2 6 

T °tals 12 6 30 

ALBRIGHT 

t*».f 2°' 1 5 

f o o o 

Sf I 2 

SJU 3 6 

Sf 

J 10 '*- 3 6 

Wen *o, g o 1 1 

ie J° tals 14 8 33 

Vall °y i« l2 - 30 

'** 15 18—33 

Pli " — — 

IS TIAN REFORMERS 

DISCUSSED BY L. W. R. 

(Continued from page 1) 

'act, t , 

'%t e e ^"ssion period did not ter- 
Ss u l ,' ntl1 8 °' ( ' Io < ,k . after which John 
Vs ^ m ari «ed the topic of the cven- 
Sl re J CUssion on the basis of Scrip- 
Ntai n eren( ' es - The "'eeting was highly 
Nns el U,R ' p rofi table, educational, and 
?' V er y e "''°. Vecl by all members prcs- 
%o K n ° n Rogers offered the bene- 



Flash Guard 




CLAIR SNELL 
Senior guard, who concluded his 
collegiate career last night at 
Lewisburg when the Valleyites 
met the Bisons in a non-league 
contest. Snell has been a member 
o£ the varsity squad for three sea- 
sons and has seen plenty of ser- 
vice in his final year at L. V. C. 
An excellent, consistent defensive 
man, this dribbler frequently re- 
gained the ball off the defensive 
bankboard to start the Flying 
Dutchmen on surges down the 
floor for valuable points. 



Frosh Counters Lose 

Final Contest to Lions 



Lebanon Valley's Frosh basketeers 
lost their final game of the season to 
the Albright Frosh last Saturday night 
by a 46 to 16 score. Doremus, husky 
forward, starred for the Lions with thir- 
teen points in the one-sided victory. The 
Blue and White Frosh trailed by a 7-5 
count at the end of the first period, and 
the Albright dribblers continued to in- 
crease their advantage throughout the 
rest of the contest. Bob Art/, was the 
only Valleyite to hit the mark consist- 
ently, counting nine points on three field 
goals and three folds. 

The lineups: 

LEBANON VALLEY 

O, F. T. 

Art/, f 3 3 9 

Grimm f 1 1 

Sei veiling f <> 

Geesey c 1 1 3 

Schaeffer g 

Whitman g 1 1 3 

Belmer g 

Totals » (i 1(i 

ALBRIGHT 

0. F. T. 

Doremus f 5 8 13 

\ t 2 4 

A/.man f * 

Schwartz f 1 1 

Thorpe C 1 1 3 

Hydock c 1 1 

Hess g 8 1 11 

Lcvanduskv g " 

o 1 r ) 

C aikawski g »..*'<.• 

Soja g » 

*i '2 8 
McCrann g ¥ 

Totals 1« 10 40 

/, V C. Freshmen 5 4 5 2—16 

Albright Frosh 7 15 9 15-46 



DELPHIANS TO SPONSOR 
MOVIES AT LOCAL THEATRE 

{Continued from page 1) 



out her tale of woe. As is customary 
in Vienna, acquaintance turns into love. 
MacMurray does not let her know his 
true identity and when she finds out 
that her lover is the man she hates most 
in Vienna she denounces him. MacMur- 
ray returns to New York. Oakie finally 
brings Miss Swarthoul and her grand- 
father to New York where they arc 
starred in a night club. Miss Swarthout is 
unhappy until she finally meets Mac- 
Murray. Then all is forgiven and a plan 
is made to unite jazz and waltz music 
"Charlie Chan at the Opera" main- 
tains the high standard set by the other 
Charlie Chan pictures. Music and melo- 
drama are combined. An opera house 
furnishes the background. Murders are 
committed during the performance. Key 
Luke, as Chan's son, tries to solve the 
mystery. His efforts are as comical as 
usual. 

Boris Karloff, an inmate in an asylum, 
shows a love of operatic music. He reads 
in the papers of the arrival of a famous 
soprano (Margaret Irving) and recalls 
that she was his wife. She and her lover 
plan to murder Karloff by locking 
him in his dressing room and setting fire 
to it. They leave him for dead. 

Karloff escapes from the asylum and 
goes to the opera house. Margaret and 
her lover are killed. Karloff receives the 
blame for the murder. Warner Oland 
comes to Karloff's aid and solves the 
mystery and the solution is guaranteed 
to be a surprise. 



Leading L. V. C. Scorer 



Student : "What is the definition for a 
lie ?" 

Prof. Richie : "Read the text of Roose- 
velt's latest fireside chat." 




Juniors Defeat Seniors 

After losing two previous tilts to the 
Senior live, the Juniors finally broke 
the ice and scored a 47-40 triumph Tues- 
day night. After a free scoring first half, 
at the end of which the losers held a 
29-27 lead, the defenses tightened and 
only Frey and Keller could rack up more 
than one two-pointer. Individual scoring 
honors went to Marshall Frey with 17. 
Johnny Trego scored 16 for the seniors. 
I he score : — 

Seniors 

G. F. Pts. 

Ungcr, F 2 1 5 

Donmoyer, F 5 o 10 

Trego, C 7 2 16 

Straub, G 1 1 3 

Loose, G 306 



RAYMIE FREY 
Sophomore center, who has con- 
tinued the fine form displayed as a 
member of last year's sensational 
freshman quintet in his first year 
of varsity competition. Counting 
133 points in league competition, 
Frey placed second in individual 
scoring standings for the season, 
his total representing an average 
of slightly better than eleven 
points per game. 



18 

J uniors 
G. 

Keller, F 5 

Capka, F 5 

Frey, C 8 

Davies, G 3 

Gongloff, G 1 



40 



F. 



Pts 



10 
10 
17 



47 



FIRST L. V. PLAY DAY 

PRONOUNCED SUCCESS 



(Continued from page 1) 



interesting demonstration on the ques- 
tions which the players had brought up 
in the morning round table. In the last 
same. Dickinson defeated Lebanon Val- 
ley's second team 48-11. 

After the game the local W. A. A. 
girls served cocoa and cookies to their 
guests before their return to their re- 
spective schools. 





4 



PAGE FOUR 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, MARCH II, 1937 



What They Say 

Question — What extra-curricular 
activities are over-empliasized or neg- 
lected at Lebanon Valley College? 



DUEY LINGER, Senior — Dramatics 
arc decidedly over-emphasized. The 
"Wig and Buckle" is superfluous, being 
anotlier brain-child (as was the Men's 
Day-Student Council.) Not enough stress 
is placed upon intra-mural athletics tor 
men. With two men in the college ath- 
letic department, a vigorous intra-murai 
athletic program for men should exist on 
the campus. 

• * # 

CURV1N THOMPSON. Junior - 
Track, wrestling, swimming, and tum- 
bling are neglected. 

* • * 

DOROTHY KRAMER, Junior — 1 
think that sports for women are not 
over-emphasized — we have the right 
amount to keep us busy and happy; 1 
am satisfied with the extra-curricular 
activites as they now exist on the cam- 
pus. 

* • • 

BURRITT LLTTON, Senior — I think 
that some sports, such as football, oc- 
cupy too important a position in an in- 
stitution of learning. More intellectual 
competition in the fields of debating and 

research of various types is necessary. 

• • » 

JOHN GROFF. Junior— I do not 
think that sports are emphasized enough 

by the students as a body. 

* * • 

JACOB UMBERGElt, Sophomore— 
Inter-class sports are neglected. Coin 
petition would have beneficial effects. 
None of the activities with which 1 ai 

connected are over-emphasized. 

• • # 

JANE CLARK, Freshman— I think 
that the extra-curricular activities such 
as dramatic clubs and intra-murai sports 
are very beneficial, but not over-empha 
sized. The addition of a French Clul 
would stimulate interest in language 
study. 

• » • 

THEODORE LOOSE, Senior — 1 think 
that intra-mural games should be stress- 
ed more. There should be activities like 
boxing and wrestling. The students as 
a whole do not get benefits from the 

commercialized athletics. 

* » * 

HENRY SCHOTT, Junior — I do not 
think any of the activities are over-em- 
phasized. The debating team does not 
get enough support from the students. 
A good, active organization for scienti- 
fic students is needed. 



Clio Entertains Mothers 



Clio girls and those mothers who 
had already arrived for the week-end 
assembled last Friday night for the 
first program meeting of the new se- 
mester. The meeting was opened by 
President Lois Harbold, who wel- 
comed the mothers and then conduct- 
ed the necessary business. 

Louise Stoner, vice-president, then 
announced the program which her 
committee had arranged. Amy Mein- 
hardt played an attractive modern 
piano solo. Minerva Hoffman then 
sang a most delightful group of solos, 
accompanied by Mary Ann Cetroned. 
Then Sylva Harclerode, in her inimit- 
able manner, read some selected gems 
from The Green Blotter. 

Following the program, several 
group games were played. The girls 
and mothers then gathered in groups 
to play cards or chat and be served 
with lemonade, cookies, and candy. 



Plan Athletic Rally 

Last Saturday Miss Landis, of Ce- 
dar Crest, and Miss Henderson, co- 
chairmen of the National Amateur 
Athletic Federation of Pennsylvania, 
took advantage of the fact that there 
were eight members of the state com- 
mit tee on the campus for Play Day. 
They were : Miss Mayer, a national 
official, Miss Martenis, of Allentown, 
Miss Aldworth, of West Chester, 
Miss Kaab, of Shippensburg, Miss 
Reeder, of Susquehanna, and Miss 
Rehfuss, of Dickinson. 

They called a meeting at which they 
planned a rally of the Pennsylvania 
N. A. A. F. members, which rally is 
to be held April 10 at the West Ches- 
ter State Teachers' College under the 
leadership of Miss Aldworth of that 
school. At that time Miss Gates from 
the national headquarters will bring 
information as to the procedure in 
advancing the N. A. A. F. standards 
in Pennsylvania. Special emphasis 
will be made' on helping WPA groups, 
small high schools, and recreational 
groups. 

The N. A. A. F. poster which four 
Lebanon Valley women made last 
year will be sent to the State Rally 
at West Chester and then to the Na- 
tional Physical Education Convention 
which will be held in New York 
April 21-24. 



Notes On Books 

In Sherston's Progress, a semi-auto- 
biographical story by Sassoon, we are 
carried through the dark, final days 01 
the war, with their disillusionment, 
tnrough shell-shock, asylums, through 
gr._e.i irish hunting fields, Egyptian en- 
campments, the futde muddy terror Oi 
French trenches, to a final understand- 
ing of the world within as molded b) 
exiernal circumstance. This is, by high 
c.it.cal canons, a great book, .vs enter- 
tainment it is superb, but as a.i analy- 
sis of a mind reacting under nerve- 
shattering stress, unsparing, tieepl) 
probing, it has an importance far tran- 
scending its entertainment value. It is 
rich in thought, beautiful in us writing; 
,i b-)ok engrossing to read, inspiring to 
know, carrying on the high tradition 
Sassoon has already set in modern liter- 
ature. 

» # * 

Church Schools of Today, by Hugli 
Hartshorne and E. V. Ehrhart, 1* a 
nook which should attract L. V. C. stu 
dents as members of one of the "church 
schools of today." Dealing with the con- 
crete realities of the present situation 
rather than primarily with theory, this 
book helps to fill a large gap in the lit- 
erature of religious education. What arc 
church schools doing today? What are 
their major problems and how do they 
go about meeting them? The authors 
report the facts for ten Outstanding 
church schools, giving a complete pic- 
ture of one and summarizing similar 
studies of nine others. The techniques 
used in securing the data are described 
in full, so that churches desiring to make 
similar studies of their own work can 
readily do so. Problems of social back- 
ground, of the religious influence of 
homes, of the present needs of the chil- 
dren, of the way in which the work is 
organized, of costs and wastes, of the 
processes of study, worship, recreation 
and social service are all included, to- 
gether with a careful appraisal of dis- 
covered processes in terms of their ade- 
quacy in meeting the needs revealed. 
This is the third in a series of four vol- 
umes that report a study of trends In 
religious education sponsored by the In- 
stitute of Social and Religious Research. 



CONSERVE DOINGS 



On Tuesday, March Hi, the following 
students will journey to Newberg to 
participate in the College Night pro- 
gram: Dorothy Zeiters, 'cellist; Mildred 
Gangwer, vocalist; and Dorothy Yea- 
kel, pianist and accompanist. 



Frosh Interclass Outfit 
Downs Sophomore Quintet 

The Freshmen completed their Inter- 
class Basketball League schedule la»t 
Thursday by defeating the hapless soph- 
omores for the third straight time. It 
gave the frosh a record of (i victories 
and 3 defeats for the season and also 
marked their fifth consecutive triumph. 
The game started with the sophs taking 
the lead and holding it until the second 
period. Then the flashy yearlings start- 
ed rolling up the points. Munday tossed 
them in over his head, Peffley flipped 
them in while travelling at full speed 
and Walk swished set shots neatly 
through the hoop. The frosh had a 20- 
13 advantage at half time and continued 
to add to that lead in the second half. 
The sophs found themselves on the short 
end of a 45-27 count when the final whis- 
tle blasted. The highlight of the sophs' 
attack was the expert shooting of Carl 
Dempsey from the side-court. 

The score: 

SOPHOMORES 

0. P. TOT. 

Rae/.er, f 10 2 

Cmberger, f 1 j. 

Weidman, f 113 

Dempsey, c r> 10 

Strayer, g ;{ (i 

Smith, g. 

Silvers, g ,. 1 3 5 

1 1 5 27 

FRESHMEN 

<i. p. TOT. 

He nperly, f I 2 

Walk, f .J. 3 11 

Peffley, f 4 8 

Baker, f 

Munday, c 7 14 

Bender, c 2 15 

Moller, g :. 1 ] 3 

Lynch, g 1 2 



•_'(> 



5 45 



MOTHER'S WEEK-END 

AT L. V. HUGE SUCCESS 



(Continued from page 1) 



Other Colleges 

llaverford College reports damages to 
college property for the last three 
months only $28.10. There were four 
fines of $2.00 each for throwing food in 
the dining room. 

# * * 

In a move to do away with traditional 
commencement exercises, the Traveler, 
University of Arkansas student news- 
paper, published an editorial proposing 
to "abolish in one sweep the expense, 
nuisance, and nonsense of Graduation 
week." 

"Of all the claptrap and useless fix- 
tures of college life, Commencement is 
one of the principal absurdities," said 
Editor J v ohn I lutchison. 

'How many seniors want to sit 
through a baccalaureate sermon com- 
prising little else but hollow platitudes 
and faulty philosophy?" the editorial 
asks. "How many seniors have any de- 
sire to endure a funeral exercise fea- 
turing boresome introductions, political 
oombast and mediocre music?" 

# * * 

And beer flowed from the water pump 
on the Harvard University campus, so 
the story goes. 

An undergraduate Aladdin who never 
even rubbed on a Harvard Lampoon to 
transform an old-fashioned pump into a 
beer-spouier had his plan to keep the 
Lank idled with enough beer to last 24 
iiours — spoiled by the alarm of a pass- 
ing student. 

Innocently the discoverer jerked the 
handle up and tlown and stepped back 
in amazement when amber litpiid gushed 
from the mouth and foamed in the 
trough. "Beer," he yelled, and 30 quick- 
ly gathered around, plying the handle 
and guzzling until they had exhausted 
the tank. 

"1 figured it would last a whole day," 
wailed the perpetrator when he heard 
of the waste. "\\ ell," he added, after 
having taken an inventory of his liquor 
closet. "I'm going to fill it with cham- 
pagne tomorrow so that people won't 
t ike exams so seriously." 

* # # 

A member of the Sophomore Class of 
Lehigh University was arrested recent- 
ly by Federal agents and charged with 
being the owner of an illicit still secret- 
ed on an old Ambler estate. A 722 gal- 
lon still, 250 gallons of illegal liquor, 
1,200 gallons of mash, and an automo- 
bile containing 13 bags of sugar were 
confiscated by the agents. 

* * * 

A University of Oregon professor of 
public speaking has invented a "sit- 
down" light with which he signals speak- 
ers to stop talking. This is preferable, 
of course, to the sounding of the gong, 
which would awaken the other students. 



dished exciting entertainment with its 
close score and thrilling moments. Af- 
ter the game everyone returned to the 
dorms and indulged in the traditional 
Saturday night feeds. 

Following Sunday School, Church, and 
dinner on Sunday, the mothers and daugh- 
ters gathered on North Hall steps and 
a group picture was taken. They were 
then taken on a tour of the Men's Dor- 
mitory to see how the other half of 
L. V. students live. At the tea given by 
the Y. W. C. A., the Irish motif of St. 
Patrick predominated in shamrock nap- 
kins, green plates, mints and decora- 
tions. The refreshments were served 
buffet style while Mrs. Lynch and Mrs. 
Stonccipher poured. 

Both mothers and daughters participat- 
ed in the program. Helen Butterwick 
played several violin selections, Jean 
Marberger gave two vocal solos, Mrs. 
Harnish sang, and Mrs. Bender played 
several piano numbers. 

More than 50 mothers attended at least 
part of the program. More than half 
this number were the guests of ' the col- 
lege for both days. 

After meeting one another, and com- 
paring daughters, the mothers left the 
campus Sunday evening. 



DI NUNZI0 
SHOE SHOP 

"Our Motto is to Please" 
A Trial Will Convince You 
9 E. Main St., ANNVILLE, PA. 



For School Supplies and 
Books of all Kinds Go To : 

BOLLMAN'S 

628 Cumberland Street 
LEBANON, PA. 




D. L. SAYL0R& 
SONS 

Contractors 

Lumber and Coal 

ANNVILLE, PENNA 



KREAMER BROS. 

Furniture 
Floor Coverings 
Electric Refrigerators 
Hoover Electric Sweep ers 
Electric Washing Machines 

RCA Radios 
FUNERAL .DIRECTORS 
Phone 144 ANNVILLE, p A 



John Hirsh Dept. Store 

Men's Leather and Wool Jackets 
Wool Mackinaws 
Weyenberg Shoes 
Phone 145 9-1 1 W . Main St 

ANNVILLE, PA. 

PEGGY'S BEAUTY 
SHOP 

Special on Frederick Permanent 
Waves 

$4.00 $6.00 

2 blocks West on Sheridan Avenue 



The GREEN TERRACE 
Restaurant 

FULL COURSE DINNERS 

85c 

Banquets and Parties Solicited 
Phone Annville — 130 



Meals Served Daily 

Best Sundaes in Town with 
Home Made Ice Cream 
Sandwiches, Cigarettes, Candy 

C. D. BRUNNER 

E. Main St. ANNVILLE, P A ' 



Complete Your Food 
Supply For That Midnight 
Lunch By Stopping At 

FINK'S BAKERY 



We sell all types of baked P«"° 
at all hours. 



iduct» 




'Start the day 

In the Modern way. 

Breakfast at the Penr.w« 



THE PENNWAY 




Vc 



SI 
"T 



In 

row 
phiai 
will 
Foll< 
Kale 
forff 
whei 
nish 

Sa 
the 
roon 
nual 
delic 
escoi 
they 
even 
Shir 

Fi 
sary 
man; 
their 
of t 
have 
Delp 
dresi 

A< 
pecti 
durii 
man; 
press 
thes< 

Tt 
Smel 
this 
alum 
danc 
thing 
enjo; 
Kale 

NE 



At 

15, t: 

in tr 
Tr 

Vert 

Katr 
An 

by B 
Tt 

Grie; 

'V 

"I 
Gold 

k 1 

Tr 
*as 
Pla y( 
^t' 
\\ 

M; 

by j 
K 

Ch 

tive). 

S 
Hec] 



4 



fcalo-Annhersary 
Dance 




It m\mmt 



j Kalo-Delphian i 



PI 



ay 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



Vol- 



xin 



ANNVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA, THURSDAY, MARCH 18, 1937 



No. 25 



play, Dinner to Mark 
Kalo's Anniversary 

SI XTIETH BIRTHDAY 

(ifhe Bishop Misbehaves," 
Comedy, Produced Jointly 
By Kalo And Delphian 

In the play. "The Bishop Misbehaves", 
hich is to be presented jointly tomor- 
row night at 8 o'clock by Kalo and Del- 



phian 



Literary Societies, Kappa Sigma 



ff ill celebrate its Sixtieth Anniversary. 
Following this choice bit of comedy the 
Kalos and their guests will attend an in- 
formal dance in the Alumni Gymnasium 
where Bill Black's Orchestra will fur- 
nish the rhythm. 

Saturday evening, promptly at 7=30, 
the dinner will be served in the dining 
room of the Hotel Hershey and the an- 
nual dinner will be under way- After a 
delicious turkey dinner the Kalos will 
escort their guests to the ballroom where 
they will spend the remainder of the 
evening dancing to the music of Al 
Shirey's Orchestra. 

Final arrangements for the anniver- 
sary program have been completed and 
many of the committees have extended 
their efforts to contribute to the success 
of the program. Tickets for the play 
have been distributed by bolh Kalo and 
Delphian and the cast is finishing its 
dress rehearsal tonight. 

As reports indicate the society ex- 
pects to entertain many of its alumni 
during the anniversary week-end, and 
many of the recent graduates have ex- 
pressed their intention of returning for 
these events. 

The anniversary president, George 
Smeltzer, has informed the reporter that 
this anniversary will see more members, 
alumni and friends of Kalo at the dinner- 
"knee than ever before and that every- 
thing points to the most successful and 
enjoyable anniversary ever held by 
Kalo. 



Women Day Students 
Postpone Date of Party 

St. Patrick was not honored yesterday 
by the women day students as previously 
intended. Since Dr. and Mrs. Lynch had 
planned to entertain the freshmen at tea 
on the same date, it was considered ad- 
visable to postpone the day student party, 
in order that the freshmen might enjoy 
both functions. 

The party will therefore be held on 
Monday, March 21, and, being a little 
too late to do St. Patrick justice, the 
Easter spirit will influence the nature of 
the affair. 

Mary Zartman, president of the. wo- 
men day students, has appointed com- 
mittees to plan the event with Gail 
Spangler and Barbara Sloane as chair- 
men of the refreshment and program 
committees respectively. 



Freshman Tea Closes 
Series of Season's Teas 



Class Cousins Serve and Pro- 
vide Entertainment for 
Guests of The Lynchs 



NEW TALENT HEARD 
IN STUDIO RECITALS 



At a studio recital on Monday, March 
} the following program was presented 
,n *e conservatory : 

v The ev ening began with "Song of the 
er mland", a Swedish air, played by 
Ying st) violinist. 

by J na Morrison sang "Take Joy Home" 
Th ass ett, and "Minnelied" by Kramer, 

G r j , ° rgan number was taken from 

V L Gynt Suitc — " In the Morn - 
' ucille Mayberry was at the organ. 

Goi de Ve W f; s W >th Me Yesterday" by 
by ^ a and " Hc y Ho for the Morning" 

sun g b u' 1 WCre the two com I )0sitioils 
T ne c L>len Himmelberger, soprano. 
Was j fSt I)iano group of the evening 
Pla yed ^ ed °y Jeanne Schock. She 

Hoven « T ndaUte ' 0p - *4' Na 2 of 
asl) anl'-p a Sunken Garden" by 
W rlin EP'togue" by Kramer. 
by t>el r- ' tenor > sa "g "Homing" 
j%i d g le S°. "With Haste My Songs 

H "Tii T g " b ^ Hahn » and De- 

Sin , rILove Her So -" 
Si L and Brah ™ compositions con- 

N the ^ rograni - They were respec- 
Stz Z0 > de -Op. , , No. 8 and "In- 
^\ an ° Flat Major." Robert 

Acc °mpan aS ^ pianist 
^ Gon timill ng the soloi sts were Sara 
ed °n Page 4, Column 2) 



The Freshman tea on Wednesday, 
March 17, marked the close of the series 
of class teas that Pres. and Mrs. Clyde 
A. Lynch have presented this spring. The 
well-planned program was presented by 
Mrs. Mary C. Green. The girls' trio, Isa- 
bel Cox, Lucille Maberry, and Arlene 
Hoffman, harmonized beautifully in sev- 
eral vocal selections; Helen Bulterwick, 
accompanied by Rita Mosher, presented 
a violin selection; a clever and entertain- 
ing reading was given by Mary Zartman, 
and a French horn selection was played 
by Isabel Cox. The junior girls on the 
program also served their class cousins, 
and Mrs. Bender and Mrs. Grimm 
poured. 

At the sophomore tea the preceding 
Wednesday the program included three 
vocal solos by Gayle Mountz, a violin 
selection by Russell Hatz, and two vocal 
solos by Rose Tschopp. Mrs. Richie and 
Miss Henderson poured, while Ruth 
Buck, Gayle Mountz, and Rose Tschopp 
served. The teas were continuous from 
three-thirty to five-thirty o'clock and 
the guests entertained themselves by 
numerous games and past issues of the 
year book. Now that they are ended, the 
students will look toward *o the series 
of spring teas next year. 



Men s Debating Team 
Travels to New York 

MEETS WAGNER, N. Y. U. 

Kinney and Shaffer Compose 
Negative Team on Extend- 
ed Tour 

On what was the Only extended tour of 
the season, the Lebanon Valley College 
men's debating team, composed of 
Charles Kinney and Boyd Shaffer, up- 
held the negative side of the current ques- 
tion against similar organizations at 
Wagner Memorial- College and New 
York University. The tour lasted for 
three days . beginnins; Thursday, March 

n. ' ■"' '' 

Although a two to one decision was 
rendered against the local team at Wag- 
ner, their visit marked the innovation 
of the Oregon system of debate at the 
Staten Island school and provided a 
large audience with the entertainment 
that the keen fire of cross questioning 
the Oregon system affords. The debate, 
which was held Thursday night, also 
marked the opening of forensic relations 
between the two schools, and it is hoped 
that these relations will be profitably con- 
tinued in the future. The Wagner nega- 
tive team will complete their first visit 
tq the Annvillo r- nous tonight when 
they meet the Valley affirmative team on 
the same question. This debate is one oi 
several included in their Pennsylvania 
tour. 

Remaining at Wagner overnight, the 
local team crossed over to New York 
City the following morning where they 
met the New York University affirma- 
tive at Washington Square Friday after- 
noon. As in the case of the first debate, 
this event also initiated relations between 
the two schools. Due to the large num- 
ber of home debates on its schedule, the 
University has consistently used the no- 

(Continued on Page 3, Column 4) 



Philo Selects York Hotel 
As Anniversary Dance Site 



Phi Lambda Sigma held an interesting 
meeting on Tuesday, March 16, at one 
o'clock. There were fifty members pres- 
ent to decide on the location of the place 
where their dinner-dance will be held 
lhe group voted unanimously for the 
Vorktown Hotel located in York, Penn 
sylvania. This hotel has served the so- 
ciety in the past, and it has always been 
found acceptable. Many who attended 
last year/s dance at this hotel were 
pleased with this year's selection. Re- 
ports were heard from the various com- 
mittees and each of the chairmen re- 
ported that their committees were active 
and progressing. It was evident that th 
groups were intensely interested in a suc- 
cess I ul anniversary. The play committee 
(Continued on Page 2, Column 3) 



Hedgerows to Present 
Twelfth Night/ Farce 

AT LEBANON VALLEY 



I. R. C. Elects New 

Cabinet Members 



Four new cabinet members of the 
International Relations Club were 
chosen this week. Helen Bartlett, 
Pauline Leininger,, Theresa Stefan, 
and doe Thomas were added to com- 
plete the cabinet of twelve members. 
It was also announced that the club 
will send several delegates to a con- 
ference on government at Harrisburg 
during the week-end of April 9. 



Campus Diamond Fans 
See Heads Up Baseball 

Scout Ira Thomas of Athletics 
Explains Films, Amuses 
Enthusiastic Gathering 



Class Visits Training School 



Those students who have enrolled in 
the course in criminology this second 
semester were further initiated into the 
mysteries of crime detection and police 
technique last Thursday afternoon when 
they visited the State Police training 
school at Hershey, Pa. The entire class, 
under the leadership of Professor Ging- 
rich, left in a body, arriving at the 
training school at about 3:00 p. m. They 
were there met and welcomed by Cap- 
tain W. F. Martin, a veteran state po- 
liceman who is now serving as an in- 
structor to the recruit troopers. Cap- 
tain Martin is a tall, commanding man 
with a striking personality. After he 



had directed the visitors into a large 
assembly hall, which serves as a class- 
room, he called attention to numerous 
exhibits which were displayed in show 
cases ranging the walls of the room. 
These exhibits contained many articles 
of interest to students of criminology, 
such as various tools and devices which 
had been used in actual crimes, besides 
numerous implements devised for the de- 
led ion of crime. Among the latter was 
the celebrated machine known as the He 
detector. 

In a lecture which lasted about three- 
quarters of an hour Captain Martin re- 
(Contiimed on Page 4, Column 1) 



Last Thursday afternoon the baseball 
players and fans of Lebanon Valley 
were privileged to hear two hours of 
instructive and interesting discourse on 
the various phases of baseball. Chief 
Metoxen first introduced Scout Ira 
Thomas of the Philadelphia Athletics to 
the large gathering which included sev- 
eral girls and faculty members. Mr. 
Thomas entertained for a few minutes 
by telling a number of humorous sto- 
ries about baseball incidents. He had 
several words to say about his Athletics 
who are now training in Mexico City. 
He looks for them to be a greatly im- 
proved outfit principally because of in- 
creased pitching strength. Among the 
statements he made was one that right 
here on our own campus we have a 
pitcher of great promise. 

Following the talk, a movie entitled 
"Heads Up Baseball" was shown. This 
picture is jointly sponsored by General 
Motors and the American League of 
Professional Baseball Clubs. It first 
showed the art of batting as performed 
by various major league stars. Slow mo- 
tion demonstrated the details. Various 
other phases of the game were also pre- 
sented, such as bunting, pivot plays, and 
pitching tricks. The second reel pictured 
the World's Series and various difficult 
umpiring problems. After the picture 
Mr. Thomas was questioned concerning 
the Athletics by several of the men pres- 
ent. Mr. Thomas claimed that the two 
major reasons that some pitchers, in 
particular, failed to make the big- 
leagues were, first, lack of natural abil- 
ity; and second, the lack of self-confi- 
deriee, including the wildness that fre- 
quently accompanies it. Those who at- 
tended I his gathering deeply appreciate 
lhe Athletic Department's thoughtf ill- 
ness in providing such an interesting 
and accomplished speaker as Mr. Thom- 
as. 



Shakesper.'an Comedy Pro- 
mises To Be Extraordinary 
Attraction By Famous 
Players 



The Hedgerow Theatre, the only self- 
sustaining repertory company in the 
country, whose play house and workshop 
is located in beautiful Moylan-Rose Val- 
ley, Pennsylvania, will journey to the 
Lebanon Valley campus Wednesday, 
April 7, for a presentation of Shakes- 
peare's immortal farce "Twelfth Night" 
in Engle Hall at 8 :oo p. m. Jasper Deet- 
ers' company will long be remembered 
for their very vivid and delightful in- 
terpretation of "Inheritors" that was pre- 
sented on the campus two years ago arid 
'he coming stage attraction promises to 
'"»e even more elaborate and entertaining. 

Shakespeare's most balanced comedy, 
"Twelfth Night" combines farce and ro- 
mance into a skillful poetic whole, which 
the Hedgerow group presents in an uncut 
version. Under the astute direction of 
Jasper Deeter, the Bard's farce of mis- 
taken identity, in the mythical kingdom 
of Illyria, is brought to full stature. It 
is the most popular of the five Shakes - 
perian productions in the Hedgerovv'r, re- 
pertory. 

In "Twelfth Night" Shakespeare has 
introduced some of his most beloved co- 
medy characters in a string of mirth pro- 
voking scenes. The prudish Malvolio, the 
inspired Sir Anthony Augecheek, the lust 
Sir Toby Belch, the merry clown, Feste, 
and the waggish Maria form an unfor- 
getable tapestry of foolery. In counter- 
point to the farce, runs the poetic ro- 
mance of Orsino pursuing "the marble- 
breasted" Olivia through his messenger 
Viola, whom he believes to be a boy and 
who is only masquerading as such. 

The Hedgerow's interpretation is much 
like the original Shakesperian one, not 
in the Victorian tradition. It is depend- 
ent upon the entire company, and as the 
Bard wrote the play for his company, 
this is historically correct. The produc- 
tion is not burdened by elaborate scenic 
effects, but flows rapidly against a rich 
background, making prominent the cos- 
tumes by Raymond Sovey, and the 
Shakesperian lines. 

The Philadelphia Records' critic hailed 
(Continued on Page 2, Column 4) 



Senate and L Club 

Furnish Joint Clubroom 

The long-protracted arrangements for 
the outfitting of a joint Senate and I, 
Cub room in the basement of the men's 
dormitory have finally culminated in 
some very definite results. It seems that 
Louis Straub, the one delegated as the 
official purchaser of furnishings, has fi- 
nally decided that choosing some furni- 
ture would stand him in good stead by 
way of experience, so he negotiated with 
Kreamer Bros, for the purchase of an 
assorted lot of chairs, couches, lamps, 
etc., which now adorn the Senate-L Club 
room, which is situated in the west end 
of the basement of the men's dorm. The 
room is to serve as a club room for mem- 
bers of either of the two organizations, 
and as a place of meeting for the clubs 
in the transaction of their business. 



PAGE TWO 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 18, 1937 



ESTABLISHED 1925 
A weekly publication by the Undergraduate Students of Lebanon Valley College 

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 
Richard A. Baus, '37 

MANAGING EDITOR ASSOCIATE EDITORS 

Edgar Messersmith, '37 William H. Earnest, '37 

ASSISTANT Louis E straub( » 87 
Boyd Shaffer, '38 

EDITORIAL BOARD 
SPORTS EDITOR FEATURE EDITOR 

William H. Earnest, '37 Louise Stoner, '38 

REPORTORIAL STAFF 

Robert Clippinger, '39 Conservatouy 

Duey linger, '37 _ ...Kalozeta^ 

Alice Richie, '39 - , Delphian 

Kenneth Eastland, '37 _ - Philoko»mia> 

Grace Naugle, '87 _ __Clionian 

Harold Beamesderfer, '37 Ernestine Jagnesak, '38 

Karl Flocken, '37 Wanda Price, '38 

Eleanor Lynch, '37 Calvin Spitler, '88 

Harold Phillips, '37 Theresa Stefan, '38 

Clifford Barnhart, '88 William Clark, '39 

Elizabeth Bender, '38 Thomas Guinivan, '39 

Sylva Harclerode, '38 Robert Long, '89 

Samuel Rutter, '89 

BUSINESS BOARD 
BUSINESS MANAGER CIRCULATION MANAGER 

Robert Kell, '37 Elwood Needy, '87 

ASSISTANT ASSISTANT 
Curvin Dellinger, '38 Ernest Weirick, '39 

Single Copies 5 cents 

Subscription $1.00 per year 

Entered at the Annville, Pa., post office as second class matter, under the Act oi 
March 3, 1879. 

Published weekly through the school year, except during holiday vacation and 
examination week. 

REPRESENTED FOR NATIONAL ADVERTISING BY 

National Advertising Service, Inc. 

Colltft Pmbliiktri Rtpmtntath* «. 

420 Madison Ave. Nkw York, N. Y. 
chicaso . boston . can Francisco 
Lot anocuis • Portland • ■iattlb 

Vol. XIII THURSDAY, MARCH 18. 1937 No. 25 



PHILO SELECTS YORK HOTEL 
AS ANNIVERSARY DANCE SITE 



(Continued from page 1) 



reported that they had selected a pla y 
which in their estimation would he 
something new to the campus. It is a 
comedy called "Thsee Cornered Moon'' 
by Gertrude Tonkonogy. In addition to 
the plans for the anniversary, the society 
planned to start the dancing classes as 
arranged in the previous meeting. Each 
member who was interested in joining 
this class was asked to hand his schedule 
to Roger Saylor to have a time for the 
class aranged. '1 his will be done before 
the vacation. The casting for the play 
took place Wednesday night under the 
direction of Dr. P. A. W. Wallace, who 
is assisting in the casting and Harold 
Phillips, who is this year's director. 
Realizing the amount of work that Har- 
old Phillips has done to advance drama- 
tics on campus, Phi Lambda Sigma feels 
fortunate in being able to secure the serv- 
ices of Phillips. 



WHO SHALL RULE? 

Monday a week ago the congress of the United States began hearings on the 
president's proposal to reform the federal judiciary, or more simply, his plan to 
retire six of the nine old men. With the main body of his proposal there is little 
opposition. The 70 years retirement age, the increase in the number of judges 111 
the lower courts, the speeding up of government cases are recognized as worthy 
and needed reforms. 

But with the part of his plan in which he askes power to appoint as many as 
six new judges to the Supreme Court to fill in for justices over 70, the president 
unleashed a savage horde of opposition- 
Let's stop for a moment and consider the proposal. Throw out of consideration 
the talk of new appointments being made to aid the already over-burdened court. 
The issue is simply whether or not six old men shall continue to have the power 
to over-ride the acts of the administration. It is whether six retired, non-elective, 
lawyers appointed by a party that has been rebuked by the people in the last two 
elections shall continue to stand above the president and the congress of the United 
States. 

The constitution never meant that they should. A diligent perusal of the text 
fails to reveal a single line expressing or implying that the Supreme court has 
the power to declare acts of congress unconstitutional. That power has been 
gradually assumed and traditionally upheld by the Supreme court ever since the 
time of John Marshall. Thomas Jefferson objected to their use of the veto over the 
executive and legislative branch of the government; so did Andrew Jackson, Abra- 
ham Lincoln, and Theodore Roosevelt. But none of these men were able to break 
the power of the court. And what opponent of the administration today would 
call them "usurpers of power" because they tried? 

The case against the court is a heavy one. Forgetting for the moment of a 
Supreme court which years ago declared that a man by the name of Dred Scott 
was not entitled to any rights under the law simply because he was born with a 
black skin, let's think of the court which declared within the past year that neither 
states nor Federal government have the power to set minimum wages or maximum 
working ijijours ; of the court that forbid the government to aid stricken farmers. 

In 1932 the American people by an overwhelming vote kicked reaction out of 
the executive chambers of governmnt and told Franklin Roosevelt to go to work- 
And all the nation, republican and democrat, co-operated loyally — except six old 
men. And they have so construed the laws before them as to cripple and harass the 
entire progress of the New Deal. They have challenged its right to operate, its 
right to seek a better day for the average American. They have challenged Am- 
erica's right to "seek a more abundant life" for itself. 

Again in 1936 by an even more enormous majority the people reaffirmed their 
faith in the New Deal. But the court still says the New Deal and its objectives 
must be scrapped. What will be the result? 

Are six old men going to rule, or do the American people still have the right 
through the ballot box to point the way that the nation shall go? 



Religious Activities 

On Sunday morning a group of Life 
Work Recruits motored to Campbell- 
town to conduct the morning service in 
the United Brelhern Church of which 
Rev. Ezra Ranck. an alumnus of L. V. 
C, is pastor. Ethel Houtz was in charge 
of the service and presented the speaker 
of the morning, Paul Horn, whose sub- 
ject was "Our Whole Heart in Chris- 
tian Work." Musical numbers included 
Dorothy Zeiters, cello, with Dorothy 
Ye.ikel, accompanist, and Virginia Nics- 
ner, vocalist, with Irene Ranck, accom- 
panist. 

» ♦ * 

Another group presented a program 
in the New Cumberland United Breth- 
ren Church, Sunday evening. Audrie Fox 
presided. Representing the Conserva- 
tory were Dorothy Zeiters and Dorothy 
Yeakel, who presented musical numbers 
and Daniel Shea ret who sang a solo. 
Paul Myers, the speaker of the evening, 
spoke on the subject, 'Sinking Amer- 
ica." 

* * * 

Under the direction of President Ell- 
wood Needy, the prog; am committee has 
arranged interesting meetings each week. 
Audrie Fox, chairlady, was in charge of 
the meeting on Monday evening. Rev. 
Grosz presented the, topic for discussion, 
"Is Religion a Reality or Merely a Con- 
formity to Custom,?" An interesting 
discussion ensued, followed by a vocal 
solo, "The End of a Perfect Day," by 
Daniel Shearer, accompanied by Rose 
Tschopp at the piano. The meeting end- 
ed with quiet meditations as Rose 
Tschopp played softly the hymn, "Lead 
Kindly Light." 

# # » 

Following is a list of Life Work Re- 
cruit deputations tor the coming Sun- 
days: 

April 4 Hershty U. B. Church. 
April 11 — Harrisburg State Street U. 

B. Church. 
April 18— Li lit/. U. B. Church. 
April 18 — Martinsburg 1st U. B. Church 

—A. M. 

April 18 — Martinsburg 2nd U. B. 

Church— P. M. 
April 25 — Greenmont, Maryland, U. B 

Church. 

AprU 25 — Manchester, Maryland, U. B. 

Church. 
AprU 25 — Millersvillc, t'enna. 
May 2 Schuylkill Haven U. B 

Church. 

May !) Jefferson] York County, U. B 
Church. 

May 23 Dallastown, Pa., U. B 
Church. 




CATHERINE RIESER 



Who is one of the most talented 
actresses in the Hedgerow Thea- 
tre. No young American actress 
has had the variety of roles that 
this young Bryn Mawr graduate 
has so successfully portrayed. 
"Kate," as she is affectionately 
called, is a slender, graceful 
young woman and a polished ac- 
tress of great range. She has ap- 
peared at Hedgerow in most all of 
O'Neill and Shaw's plays. Cath- 
erine Rieser is the zestful, youth- 
ful MARIA in "Twelfth Night." 



HEDGEROW TO PRESENT 

'TWELFTH NIGHT,' FARCE 



(Contiimed from page 1) 



the presentation as "a boon from the dra- 
matic heavens," and continued to say "It 
in the twinkle, the zest and the natural- 
ness that the excellence of Mr. Deeter's 
new production principally rests. Youth 
is shot through it. It gleams in its stride, 
which is precisely what "Twelfth Night" 
always seems to be wanting to do. Mr. 
Deeter has seen to it that the obvious 
simple charm with which the comedy 
overflows is stated unabashedly in its own 
terms. Thereby does he gain an air of 
spontantiety. It is a delight to the eye and 
a treat to the ear." 

The clowns receive as much attention 
in the Pennsylvania company's produc- 
tion as do the romantic figures. And 



Deeter has blended the two 

Of 

e atrj 
far 



conudy and romance into a fine ft 
pudding, rich in its poetry atl( j 



ical 



and served with a sauce of 
and lightness. 

The magnificent costumes by R a 
Sovey, the strikingly simple st^ %i 



)f Adrienne Bancker all contrih 

measure to the success of Hed er ' 

"Twelfth Night," and its succes 

been astounding. Despite the f* . 

act Hi; 



:e 

'oy, 

s K 

the presentation will seem unconventfof! 
:o those who have followed the infu 

the 



ury traditions of English actor 



day has been put on over sixty tii 
he past two years and is destined ^ 
nain a living pulsating interpretation 



her than a historic document fit t R 

for 1 

museum. 1 

The English Department of Leb 
Valley College through a special 
■nent with the Hedgerow Theatre T" 
made it possible for all students to 
ness the play at the lowest possible co" 
Reserved seats will be available at fit 
cents and general admission at thir/ 
five cents- The same seats for pers J" 
other than students will be seventy-fj^ 
and fifty cents. To obtain this unusual), 
low price scale it was necessary f 0r th 
English Department to practically guar . 
antee the players a capacity crowd. 

CAST OF CHARACTERS 
Orsino, Duke of Illyria— Ned Young' 
Sebastian, brother to Viola — Jay Davis • 
Antonia, a sea captain, friend to Sebas- 
tian — Hugh Graham; a sta captain, 
friend to Viola — Patrick Madden; Vol- 
entitle and Curio, gentlemen attending of 
the Duke — Mary Esherick and Paul Met- 
calf; Sir Toby Belch, uncle to Olivia- 
Harry Shephard; Sir Andrew Ague- 
cheek — Henry Jones ; Malvolio, steward 
to Olivia — Alfred Rowe; Fabian and 
Festc, a clown, servants to Olivia— David 
Metcalf and Ferd Nofer; Olivia— Mi- 
iam Phillips; Viola — Cele McLaughlin; 
Maria, Olivia's woman — Catherine Ries- 
er ; A priest — Patrick Madden. 



ALUMNI NOTES 



Past week a baby girl was born to 

Alma Binner Wise, '31, of Cornwall. 
• ♦ * 

T. Bayard Beatty, '05, who is Prind- 
pal of the Radnor Township High 
School at Wayne, was chairman of a 
panel discussion group at the School- 
men s Week program which was held at 
the University of Pennsylvania last 
week. The topic for Mr. Beatty's panel 
was "School and College Relations." 




" . . and whatever you do, don't 
forget that Long Distance rates 
are reduced ALL DA Y SUNDA Y 
and after seven every night." 

• When you make a team, win & 
game or pass an exam, tell the 
folks back home by telephone. 

THE BELL TELEPHONE COMPANY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



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LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 18, 1937 



PAGE THREE 



Nation 
rrange. 

tre has 
to wit. 
'k cost, 

at fifty 

thirty. 
Persons 
nty-five 
'usually 
for the 
Y guar- 
d. 

S 

Young; 

Davis; 

Sebas- 
captak, 
i; Vai- 
iding of 
ul Met- 
Dlivia- 

Ague- 
steward 
m and 
-David 
ia— Mi- 
.ughlin ; 
e Ries- 



□ 

born to 
wall. 



Prind- 
, High 
m of a 
School- 
held at 
ia last 
's panel 
jns. 



gports Shots 

Lebanon Valley quintet's con- 
I** { the Bucknell Bisons in the final 
jr r of the season provided a pleas- 



i for the wounds suffered by the 



(in* 



the distasteful 



, White tans in 
W . x t the hands of the Muhlenberg 
nd the Albright Lions in the ft. 
. g am es of the basketball sea- 



leag 



son. 



jjje zone defense employed by the 



Dutchmen caughl I he Bisons off 
Wf ,nd the Blue and White court 



pi* 
jters 



turn 



e( l in a neat exhibition to hand 
gucknellians their first defeat on 
floor in two seasons. 



their 



home 



^. ne Valleyites closed their 
chedule with a record of eight 
^ins and eight losses and landed 

deadlock for third place in the 
league with six wins and six de- 
feats. Lebanon Valley sports vic- 
tories over each of the clubs in 
the league except F. & M., with 
tw0 wins over Ursinus balancing 
the losses suffered at the hands 
f the champions. In extra- 
league competition the Flying 
Dutchmen accounted for two 
wins over the Bucknell Bisons 
and dropped decisions to Dickjin- 

son and St. Joseph's. 

» * * 

Raynrie Frey captured team high scor- 
ing honors with a record of 78 two- 
pointers and 2G singletons for a total of 
lg2 points, or approximately 11.5 per 
game. Captain Paul Billett trailed the 
sophomore center with a mark of 153 
points on 61 field goals and 31 fouls. 
Eddie Kress was third in the individual 
scoring with 76 tallies on 31 field goals 
and 14 foul tosses. The scoring records 
of other Lebanon Valley courtsters in- 
cluded: Ralph Billett, 26-10-62; Clair 
Snell, 19-7-45; Tony Rozman, 20-4-44; 
Bob Brown, 17-9-43; Hal Kroske, 4-3- 
11; John Speg, 2-0-4; Clarence Aungst, 
0-1-1; Ed Bachman, 0-0-0. The quintet 
totaled 621 points during the season, 
38.94 points per game. 

» ♦ # 

Stew Snodgrass, F. and M. 
forward, annexed individual 
scoring honors in league com- 
petition with a total of 162 
points, according to the figures 
released by W. J. Stevens, of 
Drexel, league secretary-trea- 
surer. Frey and Billett of the L. 
V. C. outfit were in second and 
third places with records of 131 
and 122 points. 

The first five high scorers in- 
cluded: 

Player g. Fid. Foul Pts. 

Snodgrass, F. & M. 12 69 24 162 
£rey, L. V. 12 55 21 131 

Billett, L. V. 12 48 26 122 
^Ponaugle, F. & M. 10 49 19 117 
u onaldson, Drexel 12 43 30 116 
# * * 

With the basketball season now his- 
}> the Lebanon Valley sports spot- 
JPl win turn tQ tennig and baseball 

l a 6 Sn °wstorm of the past week-end de- 
2 C(1 tlle first call for diamond candi- 
H { \ bUt C ° ach " Chief " Metoxen should 
flit, ^ S °P enin tf workouts in the near 
f 6 ^ as eball competition will again 
^ Ur e the league battles. According to 
coin** 1 indications the league will be 
Posed of Alhright, Juniata, Ursinus, 



Lebanon Valley Five 
Trims Bucknell, 40-35 

Zone Defense Thwarts Bison 
Attack As L. V. C. Quintet 
Lands Eighth Win 



Present 
""Posed 

C. ^ '.Gettysburg, Bucknell, and L. V. 
'ted the comin g season, with the 

tu tn . an White Lion aggregation re- 
adtij^ t0 membe rship in the league. In 
by « n ' t,le schedule released this week 
ext ra J athletic department includes five 
S «sq Ue ^ gUe c °ntests, with Albright, 
^ Mt an " a ' Moravian - Muhlenberg, 
• St - Mary's as the opposition. 
T * » * 

^atch" 18 activel y includes fifteen 
thi s 3S liste d elsewhere in 

c °nte s S t Ue ' Cight ° £ them t0 be 
A tri on tne home courts. 

te atn »5 f m embers of last year's 
ber ge r ° nm °y er ' Shenk and Um- 
^Wly Wl11 be relied upon 
to be the outstanding 



The 1 1. V. C. quintet concluded the 

cage season with their second win of the 
year over Bucknell, rousing themselves 
after three successive setbacks to play 
one of their best games of the schedule 
and conclude activity with a record of 
eight wins and eight losses. The seine 
in the final contest, in which the Bisons 
sustained their first defeat on the home 
court in two years, favored the Flying 
l )utchmen, 40-35. 

Playing without the services of Cap- 
tain Paul Billett, the Valleyites pre- 
sented a smooth-working combination 
with Ed Kress and Ralph Billett at the 
forward posts, ltaymie Frey at center, 
and acting Captain Clair Snell and Bob 
Brown in the backcourt. The Blue and 
White five surprised the proteges of 
Coach Mai Musser by employing a three- 
and-two zone defense, thereby effectively 
breaking up the blocking and checking 
attack of the Bucknellians. 

During the opening minutes of play 
the Bisons were utterly unable to pene- 
trate the L. V. C. defense, and through- 
out the contest the Lewisburgers relied 
on their sharpshooting from a distance 
to keep them in the ball game. 

Lebanon Valley stepped away to a 
20-11 lead at the halfway mark as the 
Blue and White attack and defense both 
functioned in high gear, but the Buck- 
nell dribblers rallied at the start of the 
second half to rack up five straight two- 
pointers and assume a 21-20 advantage. 
However, the Valleyites came right back 
to again take the lead, and the Bisons 
never again were in the van. 

The Bucknell quintet drew up to with- 
in one point of the Lebanon Valley pass- 
ers at 30-35 with two minutes to go, but 
a pair of Valleyite field goals in the 
closing moments of play enabled the 
Metoxenmen to land the contest by a 
five-point margin. 

The Blue and White starting five saw 
action throughout the entire game, Ray- 
mie Frey leading the scoring with six- 
teen points on seven field goals and a 
pair of foul goals. Ed Kress was close 
at Frey's heels for the evening with six 
two-pointers and one charity chance. 
Monahan split the cords for seven field 
goals to lead the Bucknell attack with 
fourteen points. 

The lineups: 

LEBANON VALLEY 

G. F. T. 

Kress f — 6 1 13 

R. Billett f - 2 15 

Frey c • 7 2 16 

Snell g 2 4 

Brown g — 



1 







Totals 



18 4 40 



BUCKNELL 



Monahan f. — 

Sager f 

Deegan f 

Foltz c 

Summers c 

Filer g 

Smith g 1 ' 

Carpenter g 



o. P. T. 

7 14 

1 2 
4 19 
1 1 

2 2 6 




1 



Final Interclass Standings 



Points 
W. L. Pet. For Ag. 
Seniors 7 2 .778 443 327 

Freshmen ... <> 3 .<i(>'7 xru ;}r>H 

Juniors 4 4 .500 287 282 

Sophomores 8 .000 253 373 



Totals 15 5 35 

Lebanon Valley 20 20—40 

Bucknell - U 24r~ 35 



netmen on this year's outfit, and 
the racquetmen will have to whip 
themselves into shape in a hurry 
following the Easter vacation in 
order to be prepared for the in- 
vasion by Elizabethtown on 
April 20. 



Seniors In Top Berth As 
Basketball Season Ends 

The 1936-37 Interclass Basketball 
League was undoubtedly the best ever 
run in this school. The Athletic Com- 
mittee of the Men's Senate, John Trego, 
chairman, had complete charge, select- 
ing scorers and referees. The first place 
honors were won by the experienced 
team representing the Senior Class. They 
did not lose a game until they were as- 
sured of at least a tie for the top spot. 
The offensive play of Charley Kinney 
and John Trego featured their games. 
Second place was captured by the flashy 
freshmen who came back to win five 
straight games after a slow start. How- 
ard Peffley and Dave Foreman were the 
offensive stars of ihis outfit; Jack Moi- 
ler the defensive star. The hard-fighting 
juniors finished third, bogging down al- 
ter a fine start. In last place was the 
hapless sophomore quintet which tried 
hard, but went down to defeat in ail 
its games. 

Of the 18 games scheduled, only one 
was not played on the scheduled night 
and that game never was played. Charles 
Kinney with 119, and John Trego with 108 
points were the only players to pass the 
century mark in scoring. Kinney too'j 
foul shooting honors, sinking 21 out of 
31. Only three other regulars, Trego, 
Frey, and Munday, succeeded in sinking 
more than half of their fouls. It may be 
of interest to note that a total of 55 men 
participated in these games, 17 of thein 
being day - students and 38 dorm students. 



Varsity Net Schedule 
Lists Fifteen Matches 



Donmoyer Releases Schedule 
For Coming Season; Eight 
Matches At Home 



Fifteen matches are included in the 
15)37 varsity tennis schedule as released 
recently by Captain Manager Homer 
Donmoyer. This list of matches includes 
meetings with court teams from twelve 
schools, eight of them scheduled for the 
home courts and seven on foreign soil. 

Albright, Franklin and Marshall, and 
Juniata, traditional net rivals, will be 
contested twice, according to the pres- 
ent listings, and single matches are 
scheduled with Elizabethtown, Ursinus, 
Lutheran Theological Seminary, Susque- 
hanna, Bucknell, Drexe!, Muhlenberg, 
Moravian, and Dickinson. 

Donmoyer, ace No. 1 man of the Blue, 
and White team, and Eugene Shenk and 
'Make'' I'mbergrr, also members of last 
year's team, will form the nucleus of 
the 1.937 lineup, and the net candidates 
should be able to commence racquet 
workouts shortly after the Easter vaca- 
tion. 



MEN'S DEBATING TEAM 

TRAVELS TO NEW YORK 



(Continued from page 1) 



decision plan. Dr. Shenk of the College 
Faculty was present to hear the team 
which he has coached. 

The University accorded the debaters 
twenty-four hour hospitality at the 
Sloane House, and after a thoroughly 
enjoyable trip, the team returned home 
Saturday afternoon. 

On Tuesday evening, March 15, the Ge- 
neva College affirmative team visited 
Lebanon Valley College and debated the 
same question. 



CONSERVE DOINGS 



At a students' recital next Tuesday 
evening, March 23, the following stu- 
dents will appear: Piano, Beatrice Fink, 
Rita Mosher, and Amy Meinhardt; voice, 
Mildred Gangwer and Eugene Savior; 
violin, Helen Butterwick; organ, Robert 
smith. Russell Hatz and John Zettle- 
moyer will also play two violin duets. 



* * * 



CONCERTS 
Gladys Swarthout, mezzo-soprano of 
the Metropolitan Opera Company, is ap- 
pearing as recitalist in the Wednesday 
Club Series in Harrisburg, Monday, 
April 5. 

Paid Althouse will appear in York 
sponsored by the Community Concert 
Series also on April 5. 



Tennis Schedule 



Tuesday, April 20 — Elizabethtown, 
at home. 

Thursday, April 22 — Ursinus, at Col- 
legeville. 

Monday, April 26 — Lutheran Theo- 
logical, at home. 

Tuesday, April 27 — Albright, at 
Reading. 

Wednesday, April 28 — Susquehanna, 
at home. 

Thursday, April 29 — Bucknell, at 
Lewisburg. 

Tuesday, May 4 — Juniata, at Hunt- 
ingdon. 

Thursday, May (i — Drexel, at home. 

Friday, May 7 — Juniata, at home. 

Monday, May 10— Franklin and Mar- 
shall, at home. 

Wednesday, May 12 — Muhlenberg, at 
home. 

Thursday, May 13 — Moravian, at 

Bethlehem. 
Saturday, May 15 — Dickinson, at 

Carlisle. 

Monday, May 17— F. & M., at Lan- 
caster. 

Monday, May 31— Albright, at home. 




what's the 

MATTER, 
TOMMY- 
LOSE YOUR 
PIPE? 




NO, JUDGE, I'M JUST 
GIVING MY TONGUE 
A REST 




THAT'S ODD -ALL THE yEARS 
I'VE BEEN SMOKING, I NEVER 
RAN INTO THAT' I'LL BET 
IT'S DOLLARS TO DOUGHNUTS 

yOU'RE NOT SMOKING » > 

PRINCE ALBERT 




WELL, SON, THAT'S JUST HORSE - SENSE • 
PRINCE AL8ERT DOESN'T BITE THE 
TONGUE -EVER - BECAUSE THE 
S BITE' IS TAKEN OUT BV A 
SPECIAL v NO - BITE'PROCESS 




TRY PRINCE ALBERT AND 
YOU'LL WONDER WHY YOU 
DIDN'T GET ABOARD THIS 
RICH,FLAVORY TOBACCO 
SOONER. IT'S 'CRIMP CUT^ 

TO PACK RIGHT AND 
DRAW COOL. THE 'NO-BITE' 
PROCESS MAKES IT 
MILD AND MELLOW. 
TRY PRINCE ALBERT.' 



-AS FOR REAL COOL 
SMOKIN— PRINCE 
ALBERTS SCIENTIFIC 
'CRIMP CUT'TAKES 
CARE OF THAT 




JUDGE, THESE FIRST 
FEW PUFFS OF 
PA. TELL ME ALL 
THAT— AND 
MORE 



PRINCE ALBERT 
MONEY-BACK 
GUARANTEE 



50 



pipefuls of fragrant tobacco in 
every 2-oz. tin of Prince Albert 



Smoke 20 fragrant pipefuls of 
Prince Albert. If you don't find 
it the mellowest, tastiest pipe 
tobacco you ever smoked, re- 
turn the pocket tin with the 
rest of the tobacco in it to us at 
any time within a month from 
this date, and we will refund 
full purchase price, plus post- 
age. ( Signed ) R. J. Reynolds 
Tobacco Company, Winston- 
Salem, North Carolina. 



OUR 




Prince Albert ™ 



PAGE FOUR 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, MARCH 18, 1937 



Feste 




FRED NOFER 
Who is one of the most experi- 
enced actors with the Hedgerow, 
where he has played since 1924. 
He has enacted everything from 
budding juveniles to difficult char- 
acter roles. He is also considered 
an authority on the rotating-re- 
pertory plan which plan has 
helped make Hedgerow famous. 



CLASS VISITS 

TRAINING SCHOOL 



(Continued from page 1) 

viewed the history of the Pennsylvania 
State Police Force, and cited numerous 
incidents which demonstrated their abil- 
ity and efficiency, both in the detection 
and prevention of crime. He called to 
mind a number of specific cases of 
prominence in which state troopers were 
called upon to exercise unusual ingen- 
uity to gain their objectives. The evo- 
lution of the technique of detection was 
also brought to light. 

The qualifications of applicants to the 
Pennsylvania State Police are very high, 
both physically and otherwise. Those 
who are accepted go on the pay roll as 
soon as their training commences. This 
training consists of a six month period 
of intense conditioning, including police 
strategy, procedure, physical training, 
marksmanship, close order infantrj 
drill, and riding. During this time the 
embryo troopers are given practical ex- 
perience by being sent to assist on cases 
which may arise from time to time. 



President Lynch' s Activities 



March 21 — Will address the Lancas- 
ter Y. M. C. A. at 2:30 p. m. 

March 22— Will address the Leba- 
non County Minlsterium. 

March 23 — Will attend the meeting 
of the business committee of the 
State Y. M. C. A. at 1 larrisburg. 

March 2G — Good Friday Sermon at 
the Salem U. B. Church in Leba- 
non at 3:00 p. m. 

March 28 — Easter Sunrise Serviee in 
the Coleman Memorial Park, un- 
der the auspices of the Lebanon 
County Christian Endeavor Un- 
ion, at 6:00 a. m. 



NEW TALENT MARKS 

STUDIO RECITALS 



{Continued from page 1) 



Light, Ruth Buck, Ruth Goyne and Rita 
Mosher. 

An audience small in numbers but 
large in interest heard the studio recital 
which was presented last Wednesday 
evening, March io. A number of stud- 
ents made their premier appearan?s fron. 
the conserve stage at that time. 

Irene Ranck opened the program with 
three songs, "My Mother Bids Me Bind 
My Hair" by Haydn, "Slumber Song" 
by Gretchaninoff, and "The Lass Wit'i 
the Delicate Air" by Arne. 

Gerald Hasbrouck, better known to us 
as a clarinetist, played three short 
though delightful compositions in olden 
style. They were "Gavotte and Musette," 
an old French melody, "Old French Air," 
and "Gigue," by Corelli. 

Robert Brecn, a special student, played 
Herbert Clarke's "Artemis Polka." 

Jeanne Schock also sang three selec 
tions — "Joy of the Morning" by Ware, 
"O Sleep, Why Dost Thou Leave Me?" 
by Handel, and Del Riego's "Happy- 
Song." 

The violinist of the evening was Eu- 
gene Savior. He played "Minuet" by 
Rameau, ararnged by Lifschey. 

Cordelia Shaeffer brought the evening 
to a delightful close as she played as an 
organ solo "Dreams" by McAmis. 

Accompanists were Ruth Buck, Rita 
Mosher, Amy Meinhardt, and Robert 
Clippinger. 



The New Books 

If there be any among you who are 
unduly perplexed as to just what to do 
with your excess funds, consult Dr. F. 
I. Shaffner in The Problem of Invest- 
ment. This able and brilliant economist 
offers a comprehensive and well balanced 
discussion of the various phases of the 
investment problem, in language that 
the layman can understand. Recent leg- 
islation has changed the market status 
of many securities; it is, therefore, es- 
sential to be familiar with the provis- 
ions of these laws aad their effect upon 
present and future values in the stock 
market if you are to interpret correctlj 
today's security prices and trends. 

Is There Enough a (Ad' asks Charles 
O. Hardy in one of his late books. 'I his 
question was on many lips before the 
general abandonment of the gold stan- 
dard in 1931-33, and especially before 
the onset of the depression, when there 
were widespraed fears that the gold 
mines of the world were facing early 
exhaustion, while the demand for mone- 
tary gold was steadily increasing and 
other uses were showing no signs of fall- 
ing off. This volume analyzes the situa- 
tion as it stood at that time and dis- 
cusses the sources of the present in- 
creased supply and the probability that 
a high level of output will continue af- 
ter the depression ends. Concluding that 
the problem of the immediate future is 
how to deal with a surplus, not a short- 
age, it offers some concrete suggestions 
as to the way in which monetary insti- 



Compliments of 

A. & P. STORE 

C. H. SHEARER, Mgr. 



Sir Toby Belch 




HARRY SHEPPARD 

Who is Hedgerow's oldest actor 
in years and certainly in experi- 
ence. One of the founders of the 
Hedgerow Theatre, he has en- 
acted many roles with the Phila- 
delphia troupe. Wednesday next 
Lebanon Valley will see him as 
Sir Toby Belch in "Twelfth 
Night." 



tutions may be modified to gua-U against 
an over-expansion of money on the basis 
of expanded reserves. There is includ- 
ed in the volume a revised form of ''The 
Warren-Pearson Price Theory." 

Investment Hanking, by H. Parker 
Willis and Jules I. Bogen, deals with 
all the major factors which affect se- 
curity market conditions, and presents 
a critical apprai al of various types of 
investing institutions. An enormous 
mass of data is included, and the recent 
Securities Acts and pertinent regula- 
tions of the Federal Reserve Board of 
Governors are appended. In view of the 
fact that the banking situation in the 
United States has undergone so many 
and such vital changes in the past three 
or four years, the authors have carefully 
and completely revised their pioneer 
textbook in the field of investment bank- 
ing, creating this authoritative and up- 
to-date edition. 



Sip a Soda 



at 



DiehPs Drug Store 

Why not take advantage of the many 
services we offer. 



KAL0 

A MASSAGE 
FOR 

SATURDAY EVENING 

Will < iive You Thai 
Additional Something 

35c AND 50c 

at 

Karl's Shop 



What They Say 



Question What do you think of 
World Peace? 



ODELL WHITE — Freshman : It is an 
ideal to be striven for. If we can unite 
for the purpose of wars, we should be 

able to unite for the purpose of peace. 

* # ♦ 

ALFRED SAYLOR — Junior : There 
always have been contrary people, and 
as long as there are contrary people there 

cannot be peace. 

■ * * * 

CLAIRE ADAMS — Senior: I don't 
think it's possible, not with present eco- 
nomic conditions. I am very much in 
favor of World peace, but we cannot 
have it. 

» ♦ * 

AL HEILMAN — Freshman : If we 
live up to our neutrality legislation, we 
will contribute greatly to world peace. 

# * * 

MARY E. ZARTMAN — Junior : It is 

only possible when men forget petty 

jealousies and self-interests. 

.* # * 

WARREN STRICKLER — Junior: 
Ever since 1919 we've been having peace 
conferences and today we are as near 
peace as in 1914. Universal peace is just 

a beautiful dream. 

• # # 

VIOLETTE HOERNER — Junior: 
Another world war might annihilate 
mankind from off the earth. To insure 
world peace we must substitute interna- 
tionalism for a selfish nationalism. 



RENU SHOP 

One Day Service 
Dry Cleaning, Pressing, Repairing 
11 E. Main St. ANNVILLE, PA. 



John Hirsh Dept. Store 

Men's Leather and Wool Jackets 
Wool Mackinaws 
Weyenberg Shoes 
Phone 145 9-11 W. Main St. 

ANNVILLE, PA. 



DI NUNZI0 
SHOE SHOP 

"Our Motto is to Please" 
A Trial Will Convince You 
9 E. Main St., ANNVILLE, PA. 



For School Supplies and 
Books of all Kinds Go To: 

BOLLMAN'S 

628 Cumberland Street 
LEBANON, PA. 



D.L. SAYLOR $ 
SONS 

Contractors 

Lumber and Coal 

ANNVILLE, PENNA 



KREAMER BROS. 

Furniture 
Floor Coverings 
Electric Refrigerators 
Hoover Electric Sweep ers 
Electric Washing Machines 

RCA Radios 
FUNERAL DIRECTORS 
Phone 144 ANNVILLE, p A 



PEGGY'S BEAUTY 
SHOP 

Special on Frederick Permanent 
Waves 

$4.00 $600 

2 blocks West on Sheridan Aveno, 



The GREEN TERRACE 
Restaurant 

FULL COURSE DINNERS 

85c 

Banquets and Parties Solicited 
Phone Annville — 130 



Meals Served Daily 

Best Sundaes in Town with 
Home Made Ice Cream 
Sandwiches, Cigarettes, Candy 

C. D. BRUNNER 

E. Main St. ANNVILLE, PA. 



Complete Your Food 
Supply For That Midnight 
Lunch By Stopping At 

FINK'S BAKERY 

• 

We sell all types of baked product* 
at all hours. 



CLOTHINGOF QUALITY 

J. S. BASHORE 

Lebanon , 



pa. 




'Start the day 

In the Modern way. 

Breakfast at the PennW*? 



THE PENNWAY 



H0TEI 



Vol 



Pt. 

ill 



CH 

Noi 
t 
t 

Th 
rises 
held 
o'cloi 
year 
!he ! 
be ft 
tier 1 

Th 
accoi 
to pi 
men 
the t 
fields 
fesso 
L'niv 
uate 
past- 
burg, 
recei 
(lam. 
hono 
and 
gree 
laws 

office 
Chen 
Arts 
the . 
Ame 
ten 1 
istry 
hie 
Dr. 
lar 
subj« 
C00M1 
inter 
Th 
on tl 
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ler, 
of J 
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°Qi\ 
"on 

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'nth 
the, 
r <>ut ( 

'» S] 

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K 



to , 



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4 m 



gay Tickets for 
Music Festival 




Wit Colkgieitnt 



Hail to the 
iVeu) Chief 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 




ANNVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA, THURSDAY, APRIL 8, 1937 



No. 26 



Dr. Bancroft To Speak 
Hi 67th Commencement 

CHEMISTRY PROFESSOR 

Noted Cornell Man To Fea- 
ture Exercises; Rev. Miller 
baccalaureate Speaker 

The Sixty-eighth Commencement exer- 
cises of Lebanon Valley College will be 
held Monday morning, June 7, at 10 
o'clock. This culmination of the four- 
ear period of instruction from whence 
Ihe Seniors straggle forth into life will 
he featured by an address by Dr. Wil- 
der D. Bancroft 

The appearance of Dr. Bancroft is in 
accord with the administration's policy 
to present at the yearly commencement 
men from varied pursuits representing 
the best men in a number of specialized 
fields. Dr. Bancroft is at present pro- 
fessor of physical chemistry at Cornell 
University. He received his undergrad- 
uate training at Harvard and later took 
post-graduate work at Harvard, Strass- 
hurg, Leipzig — from which University he 
received his Ph.D., Berlin, and Amster- 
dam. Lafayette honored him with an 
honorary doctor of science degree in 1919 
and Cauilbridge conferred the same de- 
gree in 1923. He also holds a doctor of 
laws degree from the University of 
Beutiiem California. Dr. Bancroft holds 
dices in the International Union of 
Chemistry, and American Academy of 
Arts and Sciences, is also a member of 
the American Chemical Society and the 
American Physics Society, and has writ- 
ten numerous articles on physical chem- 
istry including two books — The Phase 
Me, and Applied Colloid Chemistry. 
Dr. Bancroft is one of the most popu- 
lar of present day lecturers on scientific 
objects and should strike a new note in 
commencement speaking — be genuinely 
interesting. 

Ihe Baccalaureate Service will be held 
on the preceding Sunday morning, June 
J at 10:30 o'clock. Rev. Harry E. Mil- 
ler > A.B., B.D., A.M., D.D., the pastor 
of Salem United Brethren in Christ 
C1 »iu-h in Lebanon, where he has faith- 

{Continued on Page 3, Column 2) 



^ D. Lehman, '34 
Killed in Plane Crash 



Local 



"nil 



People reading the newspapers 



at, ch 26 were shocked to learn that 



f red n t i 

"on v lman ' a graduate of Leba- 
F V alley College of the class of '34., 

'ithT 10116 number who were killed 
the hiOl^* 11 * crash near Pittsburgh on 



fout 



""grit j> r , 



evious. Mr. Lehman was en 



t ^ t0 Chic ago, where he had planned 
I. \v an faster vacation when the 
se n ' ^" ^ ner in which he was a pas 



•gh led iuto a hillside near Pitts- 
b e > J brin ging death to the entire num- 

et and 1S surviveo - by nis m °th- 

-Mr-s sister s: Ruth Lehn 

• VJftl 



tan 



and 

ciner Beam, of Ardmore. 
On t1 • L,ehm an will be remember- 
S Ua 15 Car »pus by those who knew 

th, 



ch ee f 01811 wi th a ready smile and 



Part- • lvities in w,lich hc chose 
?So r tC Was marked throughout 

f ° f sever T d a high idealisnu 1Ie served 
^1U. J" al years as drum major of the 

Da,1( l» was active in 



manner. His conduct in all 



^ l P , 0siti °n on the Y 



ra 'iketl 



dramatics, 
M. C. A. staff, 



MABERRY APPOINTS 
NEW Y.W.C.A, STAFF 



Following chapel Thursday morning, 
April i, the re-election was held for of- 
ficers of the Y. W. C. A. The first elec- 
tion was disqualified because the ballot 
was extended overtime. Lucille Maberry, 
former vice president, was elected presi- 
dent; she then appointed the committee 
chairmen. They are: Edith Metzger, 
program chairman ; Louise Saylor, as- 
sistant program chairman; Ella Mason, 
prayer meeting chairman ; Barbara Bow- 
man, assistant praytr meeting chairman; 
Audrie Fox, world fellowship chairman; 
Agnes Morris, social chairman; Lena 
Risser, assistant social chairman; and 
Ruth Rupperberger, librarian. The re- 
maining officers are Helen Bartlett, 
vice president ; Helen Netherwood, cor- 
responding secretary ; Amy Montieth, re- 
cording secretary; Hazel Heminway, 
treasurer ; Dorothy Yeakel, pianist ; and 
Mildred Haas, day student representa- 
tive. The advisers are Mrs. Wallace, 
Miss Henderson, and Miss Gillespie. The 
installation of the cabinet will be held 
in chapel next week. 



Dr. Light Reelected 
As Science Secretary 

FOR THIRD TERM 



Derickson and Light Present 
Papers Before Pennsylva- 
nia Academy of Science 



The regular Spring meeting of the 
Pennsylvania Academy of Science was 
held on Friday and Saturday, March 26 
and 27, at Franklin and Marshall Col- 
lege, Lancaster, Pa. Lebanon Valley 
College was unusually well represented 
by a group consisting of Drs. Derickson 
and Light and Profes:or Grimm together 
with Norman Lazin, Donald Shay, Rich- 
ard Baus, Boyd Shaffer, and Clarence 
Lehman. Among the alumni that at- 
tended were Robert Cassel, Anna Erd- 
mann, Henry Grimm, and Professor W. 
N. Martin of Wyomissing High School. 

The sessions of the academy were in 
charge of the President, Dr. Cope of the 
Univer ity of Pennsylvania, at which 
time the various papers were presented 
by the members. Among these were il- 
lustrated addresses by Dr. Derickson on 
The Relation of Flexion and Twisting of 
Heart in Chick Embryo and Longitudin- 
al Fission in Hydra. A case history of a 
rare disease was presented by Dr. Light 
in his study of The Inheritance of Pseu- 
dohypertrophic Muscular Paralysis. A 

{Continued on Page 3, Column 2) 



Shaffer Appointed 
Editorjf La Vie 

DELLINGER PROMOTED 

New Staff Will Be Announced 
In Forthcoming Issue Of 
Weekly 

The destinies of La Vie Collegiemie 
for the year 1937-38 vill lie in the hands 
of Boyd Shaffer, of Harrisburg, Pa., 
who recently was appointed editor-in- 
chief of the student publication. Curvin 
Dellinger was appointed to serve as 
head of the busineJS staff. These ap- 
pointments were appi o'ved by the faculty 
after La Vie Collegiemie committee, com- 
posed of Dr. V. Earl Light, chairman, 
Prof. M. L. Stokes, Dr. George G. Stru- 
ble, and Dr. P. A. W. Wallace, studied 
the recommendations of the present 
editor. 

Shaffer, due to his past experience, is 
well qualified for the job that has em- 
bodied in it such a great responsibility. 
Serving as assistant to the managing 
editor for the past year, Shaffer worked 
diligently and faithfully despite the fact 
his time was taken up with the 1938 
Quittapahilla, of which he is the busi- 
ness manager. 

Curvin Dellinger has been assistant 
business manager of the paper for this 
last year, and his trai ing under the pres- 
ent incumbent, Robert Kell, will stand 
him in good stead. The contacts he has 
made will be a great asset during his 
next year's work. 

The remainder of the staff will be an- 
nounced by the new editor in the next 
edition of La Vie which will appear 
next week. 

This spring term offers to the new 
staff a splendid opportunity to secure 
a definite hold on the work, for in these 
six issues before the summer vacation a 
readjustment can be made and many 
minor problems can be solved before the 
{Continued on Page '6, Column 5) 



Conserve Dinner-Dance 



The annual formal dinner dance 
sponsored by the faculty and students 
of the conservatory will be held on 
Friday evening, April 9, at Hotel Her- 
shey. Dinner will be served at 6 :4s, 
and dancing will follow the dinner 
from 9:00 until 12:00. Bob Noll and 
his orchestra from Reading has been 
secured for the occasion. 

The committee which has been in 
charge of the arrangements is com- 
posed of Gayle Mountz, Homer Barth- 
old, Robert Heckman, Alfred Heil- 
man, Robert Johns, and Lucille May- 
berry. 



L V. C- Students at Conference 



During the Easter vacation period 
Jean Harnisch and Edgar Messersmith 
represented the International Relations 
Club and Lebanon Valley College at a 
national conference on government in 
Washington, D. C. It was sponsored by 
the National Institute of Public Affairs 
for the purpose of acquainting seniors in 
American colleges with the national 
government. They were in Washington 
from Sunday, March 28 until Saturday, 
April 3. More than a hundred delegates 
from states as far as Wisconsin and 



hi g% as a tennis player. 1 Georgia attended the sessions. 



Delegates were given cards which ad- 
mitted them to all buildings and were 
equivalent to letters of introduction. One 
of the local delegates used the card to 
gain admittance to rooms in the White 
House from which ordinary visitors are 
excluded. 

The group was entertained the first 
day at a luncheon at which an editor of 
the Washington Post was the speaker. 
After the luncheon the delegates went to 
the Department of Agriculture building 
and heard Henry Wallace, of a "stern and 
{Continued on Page 2, Column 2) 



THOMPSON ELECTED 
HEAD OF Y.M.C.A 



A combination preacher and wrestler 
has been chosen to head the new Y. M. 
C. A. staff. He is none other' than the 
one and only Curvin Livingstone Thomp- 
son, the lad of the rotund ponderosity. 
He will be remembered by present se- 
niors, faculty members, and cooks as an 
athlete of no mean ambition, especially 
in the capacity of coach and trainer of 
the Annville All-star Wrestlers. Mr. 
Thompson with his good judgment, his 
likeable manner, and his inveterate good 
humor, bids fair to be a capable man for 
the position. 

The remainder of the staff are com- 
posed of : Robert Clippinger, vice presi- 
dent ; Ernest Weirick, treasurer ; Paul 
Horn, secretary, and John Miller, pian- 
ist. Committee Chairmen will be appoint- 
ed soon by the president elect. The work 
of the new cabinet begins upon installa- 
tion, which will take place in Chapel 
some day next week. 



Kalo-Delphian Play 
Proves Great Success 

SPOHN, STRUBLE DIRECT 



Aungst and Raab Outstand- 
ing: Fine Backing Given 
Cast 



By Dr. Alvin H. M. Stonecipher 

On Friday evening, March 19, the Ka- 
lozetean and Dephian societies treated 
the college community to a very pleas- 
ant entertainment in the form of a play 
entitled "The Bishop Misbehaves." 

The play might be said to be a cross 
between an old-fashioned melodrama 
and a detective thriller. The title is 
sufficient to arouse the imagination as to 
possibilities, and the play itself brings 
no disappointment. 

The action centers around an ecclesi- 
astic, the Bishop of Broadminster, pos- 
sessed of an easy conscience and a keen 
flair for criminal investigation. He feels 
somewhat restive in his holy office and 
compensates himself for the restraints 
of his episcopal position by indulging 
vicariously his streak of criminality by 
reading detective stories. Closely asso- 
ciated with him is his prim maiden sis- 
ter, who also confessed to a long-felt 
pirate instinct and takes genuine pleas- 
ure in an evening's contact with the 
seamy side of life. 

The action is furnished by one Donald 
Meadows in his defense of his fiancee, 
Hester, who is being cheated out of her 
patrimony by the prosperous but un- 
scrupulous Mr. Waller. Not having suf- 
ficient evidence to warrant legal re- 
course, Donald Meadows conceives the 
idea of robbing Mr. Waller of his mon- 
ey and other valuables and Mrs. Waller 
of her abundant jewelry and thus re- 
storing to Hester what rightfully be- 
longs to her. 

The play opens with a scene in a Lon- 
don "p u D"> the proprietor of which, Red 
Eagan, has been secured as a confeder- 
ate by Meadows. The Wallers are to 
pass by on their way to meet a social 
engagement, and so a trap is laid to 
puncture a tire of their car and thus 
force them to stop at the taproom. As 
{Continued on Page 2, Column 4) 



Lois Harbold Chosen 
May Queen For 1937 

RUTH BUCK HONORED 



Physical Education Depart- 
ment Commences Prepara- 
tions for May Day 



Spring is here! At least we have one 
infallible sign of its presence. May Day 
preparations are under way, and how ! 
The May Queen and her court have been 
selected, too. The chief honor has fallen 
to Lois Harbold, who will rule over the 
May Day proceedings. Her maid of 
honor is to be Ruth Buck, while the fol- 
lowing girls will compose the court: 
Gayle Mountz, Grace Naugle, Sara 
Katherine Meckley, Eleanor Lynch, M'ar- 
jorie Smith, and Romaine Stiles. 

The plans for May Day have been 
completed and practice for the various 
dancing groups has already begun. If the 
weather permits May Day will be held 
on May 8. The motif for this year's cele- 
bration is that of a carnival, and in 
carrying out this plan there will be 
clowns, a ball dance, and a hoop dance. 
Besides this there will be fairies, soldiers, 
pirates, cowboys, and cowgirls all ap- 
propriately dressed in costumes already 
in the making. 

Several changes are being made fiom 
the traditional May Day on this campus. 
There will be two May Poles, the 
streamers being of light pastel shades to 
give a rainbow effect. The queen and 
her court will be seated under a canopy 
of blue, green, and gold. The members 
of the court will be dressed in gowns of 
various soft shades to further carry out 
the rainbow idea. The throne, seats of 
honor, and the platform will be of a 
shade of green to blend with that of the 
grass. 

The plans for May Day have been 
carefully worked out, but it is necessary 
to have the full cooperation of all the 
student body. The Physical Education 
Departments have already selected their 
groups and practice is under way- Sched- 
ules are to be posted on the main bul- 
letin board. 



Five L V. C. Students 
Listed in Whos Who 



Duey Unger, Paul Billett, Francis 
MacMullen, Boyd Shaffer, and Richard 
Baus are the five Lebanon Valley Col- 
lege students whose biographies are 
listed in the 1936-37 edition of Who's 
Who Among Students in American Uni- 
versities and Colleges which recently 
came off the press. 

This publication, consisting of the bi- 
ographies of approximately 2300 students 
representing 394 colleges and universities, 
is enjoining its third year as an authori- 
tative source of information concerning 
the outstanding students of American 
colleges and universities. This book is 
subscribed to by graduate schools, busi- 
ness, and industry. 

The biographies, aside from the rout- 
ine biographical information, list also the 
extra-curricular activities, societies, hon- 
ors, hobbies, and vocations planned by 
the students. One section of the book 
lists separately the universities and col- 
leges represented together with the names 
of the students whose biographies are 
published. 



I 



PAGE TWO 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, APRIL 8, 1937 



ESTABLISHED 1925 



A weekly publication by the Undergraduate Students of Lebanon Valley College 



EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 

Richard A. Baus, '37 



MANAGING EDITOR 

Edgar Messersmith, '37 
ASSISTANT 

Boyd Shaffer, '38 



ASSOCIATE EDITORS 

William H. Earnest, '37 
Louis E. Straub, '87 



EDITORIAL BOARD 
SPORTS EDITOR FEATURE EDITOR 

William H. Earnest, '37 Louise Stoner, '38 

REPORTORIAL STAFF 

con servatoky 

_ _ Kalozetan 

_ Delphian 

_ philok08mian 

Clionian 



Robert Clippinger, '39 

Duey Unger, '37 

Alice Richie, '39 

Kenneth Eastland, '37 

Grace Naugle, '37 

Harold Beamesderfer, '37 
Karl Flocken, '37 
Eleanor Lynch, '37 
Harold Phillips, '37 
Clifford Barnhart, '88 
Elizabeth Bender, '38 
Sylva Harclerode, '38 
Samuel Rutter, '89 



Ernestine Jagnesak, '38 
Wanda Price, '38 
Calvin Spitler, '88 
Theresa Stefan, '38 
William Clark, '39 
Thomas Guinivan, 
Robert Long, '88 



'39 



BUSINESS BOARD 
BUSINESS MANAGER CIRCULATION MANAGER 

Robert Kell, '37 Elwood Needy, '37 

ASSISTANT . ASSISTANT 

Curvin Dellinger, '38 Ernest Weirick, '39 



Slng-1* Copies. 
Subscription. . 



5 cents 

.$1.00 per year 



Entered at the Annvllle, Pa., post office as second class matter, under the Act of 
March 3. 1879. . WJ 

Published weekly through the school year, except during holiday vacation and 
examination week. 



REPRESENTED FOR NATIONAL ADVERTISING BY 

National Advertising Service, Inc. 

Colli f Fmblithtrt Rtprestntaltvl * 
420 Madison Ave. New York. N.Y. 
Chicago - Boston • ban Francisco 
Los anoeuss • Portland - Seattle 



Vol. XIII 



THURSDAY, APRIL 8, 1937 



No. 26 



YOUR COOPERATION 



Within just one month Lebanon Valley will observe its annual May Day. Al- 
ways one of the high spots on the college's program, it has assumed an increasing 
magnitude as the years have passed, until at present it represents an outlay of 
time and expense and a quantity of planning and labor that are truly astounding. 
The program of dancing and pageantry for this year promises to compare very 
favorably with those that have gone before. All that is necessary in addition is a 
body of willing participants, who do not mind spending a little time to perfect an 
entertainment that gives pleasure to many and not a little credit to Lebanon Val- 
ley. This day brings back to the campus more alumni than does Homecoming, 
Alumni Day, or any other event on the college calendar. Traditionally, May Day 
is the day all loyal alumni return to Lebanon Valley to renew college friendships 
and to be entertained by the present commorants. 

The women who take part in May Day, who are the ones who have helped to 
plan it and who probably derive the most enjoyment from it, certainly are willing 
to extend themselves that the spring pageant may be a success. But there always 
has been a murmur of discontent among the necessary male participants, which 
has little, if any, justification. The men can do their part, and derive an appre- 
ciable amount of pleasure by appearing regularly and on time for the practices. 
It is an honor to participate in the May Day program, an honor which appears 
in the year books under the participants' names. So, during this next month, let 
the men do their little part toward making one of Lebanon Valley's good tradi- 
tions a success. 



THE RETIRING STAFF SAYS 



With this issue of La Vie the senior members of the staff relinquish their 
jobs to the present incumbents. Our association with La Yii: has been most en- 
joyable. Here was an excellent opportunity to learn something about journalism 
of which we believe we have profitably availed ourselves. 

It has generally been the custom of the outgoing editor to blow the horns 
and beat the drums, usually to the tune of a recapitulation of the progress made 
by the paper during his term. We are going to be a little different this year. We 
do not intend to bore you with long lists of statistics concerning column Inches 
and number of news articles appearing on the front page as compared to those 
appearing elsewhere in the paper. 

Nevertheless, during our regime we never forgot one outstanding principle! 
To make the paper interesting. In order to gain this end we have subjected the 
paper to m.any inovations: New type, headline experiments, front page layouts, 
feature articles and column work, various student polls and questionnaires, and 
lastly, a style hook which we bequeath to the incoming staff. In so doing we have 
acted only in accordance with a general La Vie policy of contributing a little to 
journalistic perfection. 

Finally we wish our successors the same measure of enjoyment that we, the 
retiring staff, have derived from our work. We also encourage our readers to 
continue to give the same constructive Criticisms and serious attention that La 
Vie has received in the past. 



May Queen 




KALO-DELPHIAN play 

PROVES GREAT SUCCESS 



I 

LOIS HARBOLD 

Lebanon Valley senior who re- 
cently was elected Queen of the 
May. Lois' home is in Dallastown, 
Pa. She has been active in extra- 
curricular activities during her 
four years at college. 



L. V. C STUDENTS 

AT CONFERENCE 



(Continued from fag* 1) 



forbidding countenance", outline the aims 
of his department. The Civil Service 
Commission was also visited, where 
tentative reforms were discussed. Sec- 
retary of Commerce Roper and Attorney 
General Cummings also outlined the du- 
ties of their departments. Both dele- 
gates stated that they were surprised at 
the favorable impressions these men 
made, and felt that they were really com- 
petent men. 

The delegates personally met Chief 
Justice Hughes, as he said, in the "inner 
sanctum" of the Court. A case con- 
cerning public utilises was being debated 
at the time. No ordinary visitors are 
allowed in this room. Hughes was de- 
scribed as a "genial old gentleman." 
Hearings before the Judiciary Committee 
on the Supreme Court issue were heard. 
The delegates also met the administrators 
of the R.E.A. and the P.W.A. Both rep- 
resentatives concluded that the "New 
Deal" administration was more efficient 
than had been supposed. Maybe. 



ALUMNI NOTES 



Martha I'lrich Kreider, '34, of Bowl 

ing Green, Media, and Casimir George 

ttudiniki, '34, of Wilkes-Barre, were 

married Sunday, March 28. They will 

live in New Haven, Conn. 

» HP - ■ m 

Ruth Strubhar, '29, and William E. 
T. Hitter were married in November 
Mrs. Hitter has been teaching English 

in the Ambler High School. 

# # # 

Last Saturday Mary March, '35, and 
William Speg, '33, were married. They 
will live at 1'axtang. 

• • • 

Two new poems by Norman C. Schlich- 
ter, '97' of Annville, have just been 
published in London, England. They 
appear in the March issue of Poetry of 
Today, the quarterly publication of the 
Poetry Society of London, just out in 
London and New York. One of the po- 
ems is called "Lament for Two Kings: 
George V and Kipling," and makes a 
special appeal to lovers of Kipling and 
to Britishers generally. The other poem 
is in praise of the Bible and is entitled, 
"Down the Wind." 

Recognition by this society is the high- 
est that conies to present day poets. 



In behalf of the faculty and 
student body, La Vik wishes to 
express its sincere sympathy to 
Audrie Fox and Miss Ella 
Moyer whose mothers passed 
away recently. 



(Continued from page 1) 



W aller's chauffeur is a friend and con- 
ieueraie of Meadows, the seneme works 
and the \v allers enter the tavern. Mead- 
ows also enters shortly, holus them up, 
and, with the assistance ox Red, the 
oarnian, relieves them oi the*r valuables, 
iliese he deposits in a mug on tiie man- 
tle to oe collected la<.er by Frenchy, an- 
other tnenu, wnile the Vv allers will be 
lying bound and gagged in a back room. 

uut at tins point the arrival oi the 
bishop witn his keen scent lor mystery 
uegiiKi to spoil the well-laid scheme, tie 
nas Happened to stop to make a tele- 
phone call and finds the place deserted 
and pervaded with an air of mystery, 
ne and his sister, Lady Emily Lyons, 
finally discover ihe Vv alters and Red in 
the back room and release them. Amid 
the events that follow the bishop be- 
comes suspicious of Red, discovers the 
swag, removes it, and leaves his calling 
card in its stead. 

This soon transfers the scene to the 
episcopal palace Where the bishop in a 
series of surprising and exciting moves, 
ably assisted by his sLter, outwits the 
robbers, wins their commence, and gains 
much valuable information as to the 
cause of the deed. The vv allers also ar- 
rive, and by means of the information 
gained the bishop forces Waller to re- 
store the money due to Hester, lhus ali 
ends happily, and ail are happy except 
Waller. 

Though "The Bishop Misbehaves" is 
not great drama, it is good entertain- 
ment. It pictures human nature with its 
failures and foibles and shows the com- 
mon clay in ail, whether bishop or bar- 
tender. The action moves swiftly, there 
are abundant surprises, and there is not 
a dull moment in the whole play. 

The characterization on the part of 
the cast was in general excellent. Good 
judgment was shown in the selection of 
individuals for the various roles. Dean 
Aungst as the Bishop of Broadminster 
was a decided success. His clerical ap 
pearance was convincing and his care- 
tree manner well portrayed the church 
man, conscious of his latent abilities, 
bent on an evening of adventure. 

Anna Morrison gave a satisfying por 
trayal of Lady Emily Lyons, the bish- 
op's spinster sister. She revealed the 
manner of a lady long accustomed to a 
life molded by the rules of refined so- 
ciety and the restraints of a churchly 
environment, through which gleamed 
from time to time the smouldering fires 
of a more primitive nature. Her efl'ec 
tiveness, however, was somewhat spoiled 
by an indistinct enunciation induced by 
a not very successful attempt to affect 
British articulation. Many of her lines 
were lost even to one who had read the 
play. 

Richard Smith's role as Donald Mead- 
ows, the young man of good social stand- 
ing turned bandit, was commendable, 
though his habitually good-natured fa- 
cial expression did not always convinc- 
ingly register the stern and frightful 
possibilities of some of the situations. 

The part of Hester, Meadows' fian- 
cee, was well taken by Mildred Haas. 
She convincingly portrayed the worried 
anxiety of a girl reluctantly consenting 
to her fiancee's desperate and danger- 
ous scheme to right the wrong done her. 

The Waller couple was well represent- 
ed by Edgar Messersuiith and Barbara 
Bowman. Messersuiith was quite suc- 
cessful in bringing out the characteris- 
tics of the blunt, uncultured, successful 
business man, domineering but knowing 
when to retreat before the menacing fin- 
ger of his better half. His acting was 
somewhat stiff and lacking in natural- 
ness, but generally effective. Miss Bow- 
man's role as .Mrs. Waller was excel- 
lent. She well represented the woman 
of fine sensibilities who is conscious of 
her power over her coarse, blustering 
mate. , 

Harlan Kinney, Arthur Heisch, and 
John Spcg took the parts of Bed Fagan, 
Collins, and Frenchy, Meadows' confed- 



Kalo's Acoustics Improve 

Conservatory students were Iquh • 
i • r a [ n 

their praises ot a new improve^ 

to the facilities of the co user vat i 

when they attended their first instr^ 

mental classes after the return f r( U ~ 

vacation. 

Kak> hall had been treated 

new acoustic material on the ceilin 

,o that whereas the period of reve ^' 

Deration had been formerly Ue " 

five seconds, it has now been redu Ce ^ 

to practically nothing- The materia 

is approximately three-eighths of 



Oftl 

With a 



nailed 
space 
was 



inch in thickness, an it was not 
directly to the ceiling, but an air 
of about three-quarters of an inch 
allowed between the material and the 
ceiling of the room. 

1 hrough the installation of this ma 
terial, the hall has been made the most 
acoustically satisfactory room on the 
campus for music auditions. 



erates in the holdup. Kinney as Red, the 
gangster barman, was none too success- 
ful in his attempt to look "tough," but 
otherwise he took his part well. Heisch 
and Speg played their parts quite satis- 
factorily. 

Charles Itaab as Mr. Brooke, the el- 
derly secretary to the bishop, did good 
work. The appearance of age was lack- 
ing, however, except in movement and 
action. His portrayal of the extreme ti. 
midity and physical cowardice of Mr, 
Brooke was highly successful. 

The criticism offered above in refer- 
ence to indistinct enuniciation might 
have been made of other characters also. 
The chief defects of the performance 
were low voices and indistinct enuncia- 
tion. 

Much credit is due to those who cared 
for the physical equipment: to Robert 
Spohn, Lloyd Beamesderfer, John Bro- 
sius, Gerald Clymer, and John Beames- 
derfer for their effective stage construc- 
tion, marred only by an unruly window 
casement which was so sensitive to the 
movement of the door that it insisted 
on falling into the room whenever the 
door was opened; to James Miller, Ella 
Mason, Greta Heiland, William Scher- 
fel, Sarah MacEwen, and Agnes Morris 
for their provision of appropriate prop- 
erties; and to Ed. Schmidt and Allen 
Rutherford for the successful lighting 
effects. To Harold Philips also is due 
much credit for his very effective make- 
up work. 

And. finally we wish to express our 
commendation and appreciation of 1 
able work of Dr. George G. Struble fl? 
Mr. Robert Spohn in directing the P' 
duction of the play. To them is 
vote of thanks. 



due l 



Cameron Beck Speaks 
On Leadership 



the 



'Leadership for Tomorrow'' vV ^^ 
Beck's a , 



subject of Mr. Cameron 



to the student body in Chapel on > ^ 

•2.'3. In this inspirational s P ee ^ 

Beck drew from his wide ' 

ciiiiip 1 



many helpful suggestions and eS ^ 
He stressed the need of ^ 
leaders who possess original"-;* ^jj 
punctuality, courtesy, and a wl 
to work hard. fie* 
Mr. Beck, a director of ^ ^ 
York Stock Exchange Institute, ^ 
tive of Pennsylvania. Springi 11 ^ Jfljt 
the South Side of Pittsburgh* ^ ^0 
his father and was obliged to g° ^ 
when he was fifteen. Then M sU ch 



wage was only three dollars- ^ ^ 



Fro" 1 i0 



an humble beginning Mr. ^ 
a connection with the New £ll rs 



tv y 

Exchange that has lasted '^f^d <f 
During these years he has ad ^ P> 
proximately twenty mffliO n 1 {Ql t!^ 
twenty-four states, opening «P f rjf* 
"a few pages from the B° ' 



Si* 



sp rl 
ci 



by 

t >fh 
the ca 
their ] 
posit* 
and ti 

„iei» b( 

lost b; 

„ietho« 

easily 

Indica 

point 

raent. 

young 

assign 

Billert 

season 

pected 

Metox 

sters ; 

m I 

right-! 

Beli 
Eddie 
ing ai 
unsett 
picked 
Davie; 
first 
outsta 
outfiel 
probal 
berths 

Chie 
his m 
April 
pitche 
tnust 
must 
By th 
these' 
smootl 



actr 

MA 
Shirle 

movie 

CO] 
West. 
1 gue 

DM 

G£ 
John 

^ ta 
jealou 
e ve ry1 

El: 

Ray e 
their 
Parts 

Ha 

but t, 



l> 



i, ti 



Ul; 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, APRIL 8, 1937 



PAGE THREE 



in 
eat 

fil- 



er- 
rl, 
*d 
rial 
an 
led 
ice 

* 
ost 
the 



cess- 
but 
eisch 
satis- 

ie el- 
good 
lack- 

and 
ie ti. 

Mr. 

'efer- 
night 
also, 
mnce 
incia- 

cared 
obert 
Bro- 
iraes- 
itruc- 
ndow 
a the 
iisted 
r the 
Ella 
idier- 
lorris 
prop- 
Allen 
;hting 
5 due 
nake- 

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f the 
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pro- 
flue a 



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s tl' e 
Idress 

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„ple» 
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, lost 

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BaS eballers Warm Up 
For Coming Season 

. players Vie For Pitching 
^ posts. First Game April 16 

. „. i s in the air once again, anil 

fipfl"B 

t ] ie baseballs batted and thrown 
ipf Metoxen's diamond warriors, 
fternoon since the Easter recess 
da ti s have been going through 
in an effort to win regular 
According to the enthusiasm 



r>' h 8 , 
eandi 



ces 



the 

U,eir P a 
aS itii>" s - 

1 i cobber of the hopefuls, Lebanon 



should once again be a strong 

tender for the League title. Several 

C ° n u , c of the 1936 outfit have been 
,iiei« berb 

either graduation or some other 



lost by 

, u .a but capable replacements should 
lueti^"' 

., u e found among the newcomers. 

Indications are that the team's strong 

• t will again be the mound depart- 

f No less than six strong arined^ 
nient- 

voung » ien are 8 unnin 8 for the P itcnin S 
' assign ments. The only veteran is Paul 
Billed, ace right-hander for the past two 
easons. His speed and control are ex- 
pected, to go a long way toward making 
Metoxen's nine a winner. Other slab- 
jters are Marshall Frey, Wilbur Gibble, 
Bill Scherfel, and George Catchmer, 
right-handers, and Lenker, a southpaw. 

Behind the bat we will probably find 
Eddie Kress, with James Whitman act- 
ing as a reserve. The infield is quite 
unsettled as yet, but no doubt it will be 
picked from Poloniak, Capka, It. Billett, 
Davies, Seiverling, and W. Brown. The 
first four are veterans; the last two 
outstanding freshmen prospects. The 
outfield is even more unsettled and will 
probably remain so until the other 
berths are filled. 

Chief has plenty of work to do with 
his men before the opening game on 
April 16 against the Palmyra A. A. The 
pitchers must find the plate. The batters 
tnust tune up their eyes and the fielders 
must adjust their sights to the fly balls. 
By the time the league season opens all 
these departments should be functioning 
smoothly. 



What They Say 

Question — What movie actor or 
Mtns s do you dislike most? Why? 



MARY TOUCHSTONE, Freshmanr- 
*j% Temple. She's cute, and she 
Ws d. They spoil too many good 

" K)Vles to give her a chance to show off. 

• • • 

COUA GRABY, Sophomore — Mae 
• -ane puts on too many airs, but 
guess it i s probably all in the game 
ut '"ovie-acting. 

• • • 

j j^HALDlNE BOYEll, Sophomore— 

k 1 " J^rymore. In most of his movies, 

akes the part of someone who is 

e We always wants to be first in 
Wang. 

• • * 

Ha E ye EAN ° H LYNCH » Senior— Martha 
their ° r JameS Ca S ne y- 1 J ust don ' 1 like 
Parte ^ Cti()ns > their personalities, or the 
s th ey take. 
. * * * 

r e i ^° LD LIGHT, Sophomore— Lau- 
b ut th H »rdy. They try to be funny, 
e y are boring to me. 
Wrv * * * 

lii o^n, Dl ! OW HIMMELWRIGHT, Be. 

*ble. I don't like to sec 



1937 Baseball Schedule 



Wednesday, April 21 — Albright 
Away. 

Wednesday, April 28— Susquehanna 
Home. 

Tuesday, May 4— 'Gettysburg 
Home. 

Friday, May 7 — *Ursinus 
Home. 

Saturday, May 8— 'Albright 
Home. 

Wednesday, May 12 — Moravian 
Home. 

Saturday, May 15— Muhlenberg 
Away. 

Wednesday, May 19 — 'Bucknell 
Away. 

Saturday, May 22— Mt. St. Mary's 
Away. 

Wednesday, May 26 — *Drexel 
Away. 

Saturday, May 29 — * Juniata 
Away. 

* Denotes collegiate league games. 



DR. LIGHT REELECTED 

AS SCIENCE SECRETARY 



(Continued from page 1) 



„^Clark Ga 



,: 't ( . 



a picture in which he wears a 
suit. 



Ha * * * 

>Vu °£ D t PHILL1 PS, Senior— Dick 

'* know whv - The Syrupy 
Just plain gripes me! 
Dft • * * 

P r*nch ?? EV:E,N SON, professor of 



-Charles 



Farrell. I thought his 



Vr artificially sweet and that 
ea depth. 



paper on parasitic isopods completed Dr. 
Light's contribution to the meeting. Mr. 
Cassel, a graduate student at Johns Hop- 
kins University read a paper on Spiral- 
ling in Paramecium, while Miss Erd- 
mann, a teacher at the Hershey Industrial 
School discussed The Formation of 
Stoma in Brophyllum Calycinum. 

The Pennsylvania Academy of Science 
is composed of some five hundred scient- 
ists of the state and a few from sur- 
rounding regions. Professors and re- 
search workers in schools and colleges 
constitute the greater part of this num- 
ber, although not a few lawyers, doc- 
tors, and industrial leaders are included. 

At the business meeting of the Aca- 
demy, Dr. Light was reelected to a third 
term as Secretary of the organization. 
Dr. George Ashley, the State Geologist, 
was elected president to succeed Dr. 
Cope. 

The next meeting of the academy will 
be held at Coudersport, Pa., during the 
last week in August. 



DR. BANCROFT TO SPEAK 

AT 67TH COMMENCEMENT 



(Continued from page 1) 



fully served for 33 years, will deUver 
the sermon. Rev. Miller is an alumnus 
of L. V. C. and Bonebrake Seminary 
and through his wide experience in the 
ministry has acquired an enviable repu- 
tation as a speaker and counsellor of 
youth. His address promises to be re- 
ally edifying and helpful. 



STUDENT THEME 

My Criminal Career 

By Stewart Shapiro 



"Oh, if I had the wings of an angel" 
Many's the time I have heard that tune 
in my life. In fact the prisoner's song 
has become one of my favorite melodies, 
partly because of its sweet "swing" and 
partly because of the fact that it applies 
so suitably to my ignoble criminal ca- 
reer. Yes, it's true. I'm a big, bad, 
bold criminal. If you don't lock your 
doors tightly tonight, I might become 
obsessed with my mania to (shall I say?) 
lift something. 

My terrible criminal tendencies have 
dominated my youthful career. But lately 
they have diminished somewhat, and my 
criminal life has become somewhat nebu- 
lous. But I, a person brought up in 
enviable surroundings, have adventured 
on a malicious path (one which our high 
school "Pof D." bok said could only 
end in hopeless destitution.) 

Although I indulged in many petty 
misdoings in my childhood, I shall not 
bore the reader with their recital. I 
shall rather relate the incidents of one of 
my more atrocious crimes. It was this 
crime which culminated a career that had 
been growing like that "pet" boil, and 
was ripe and juicy, ready to come to a 
head. 

Ah me, would that I could forget it ! 
Well, it happened in high school. It was 
a rainy afternoon when I, with an insol- 
ent grin on my grotesque countenance, 
stole up to the high school "chem" lab- 
oratory. It was just like taking candy 
from a baby. It happened that our idiotic 
chemistry teacher had, as usual, with his 
characteristic negligence, left unprotect- 



ed, uncovered, an helpless, a poor little 
bottle of my pet chemical, sodium. There 
stood little "Na", helpless and alone 
against a cruel world. "Na's" only pro- 
tection was the kerosene under which it 
was submerged, to protect it from the 
moisture of the atmosphere. Contact of 
sodium with water, as you know, pro- 
duces a violent reaction. Glancing hur- 
riedly around, I, the heartless criminal, 
spotted my objective. With "nary" a 
sound I stealthily crept up to the bottle 
of "Na," and with practiced hand I 
iezed a few pieces and stowed them care- 
fully and furtively in my hip pocket be- 
fore making one of my famous lightning- 
flash get-aways. 

» » ■ 

If you were around L. H. S. a few 
days after this little incident, you might 
have heard a buzzing about a certain 
male student. Let's listen in on the con- 
versation of the school gossip. 

"Hey Jake, did ya hear about that 
dumb duck ones? (one of my many alias 
cognomens.) Yeah, he snatched some 
sodium from the 'lab' the other day, and 
d'ya know what happened? Well, it 
seems that he went out in the rain, and 
the stuff caught fire, and burned him in 
the seat. . . . Yah, it serves him right. 
I bet old 'Pud' will be sore when he finds 
half his sodium gone. Well, so long. 
There goes 'Screwy', and I'm just "ach- 
in' " to tell 'Screwy' because he hates the 
sap as much as I do." 

Well, gentle reader, you may surmise 
what happened to me. I was caught and 
promptly scandalized for my sin. After 
that episode, I ceased to be an addict to 
the ways of Satan. In fact, I reformed 
(partly)- But to this day I carry that 
mark of iniquity on one of the more 
delicate parts of my anatomy. That 
mark is a burn scar, and upon the in- 
quiry of my friends I say, "That? Oh, 
that's a birthmark." 



President Lynch* s Activities 



April 4— Rally Day Address at the 

Mechanicsburg United Brethren 

Sunday School. 
April 9— Will address the Lebanon 

High School Assembly. 
April n— Rally Day Address in the 

West Lebanon United Brethren 

Church. 

April 12— Will address the adult dis- 
trict rally at the Palmyra Second 
United Brethren Church. 

April i 3 _Will address the Steelton 
Parent Teachers Association on 
"Intelligence Tests." 

April 14— Will address the American 
Business Men's Club at Hotel 
Traylor in Allentown. 

April 15— Will address the Lebanon 
Business Men's Association at their 
34th Annual banquet in the Weimer 
Hotel. 



SHAFFER APPOINTED 

EDITOR OF LA VIE 

(Continued from page 1) 



busy fall season taxes their time. It is 
one of Lebanon Valley's customs to in- 
stall the new members at this season, 
which is filled with many news items. 



Rev. C. Willard Fetter, '35, of Mays- 
ville, W. Va., and Grace Hockley, of 
Lebanon, were married Thursday, March 
25, at Martinsburg, W. Va. They will 
reside in MaysviUe where Rev. Fetter 
is a United Brethren minister. 




WHATS THE 
MATTER, 
"TOMMY- 
LOSE YOUR . 

PIPE? yj 




NO, JUDGE, I'M JUST. 
SIVING MV TONGUE 
A REST 




THATS ODD— ALL. THE YEARS 
I'VE BEEN SMOKING, I NEVER 
RAN INTO THAT.' I'LL BET 
IT'S DOLLARS TO DOUGHNUTS 

YOU'RE NOT SMOKING , ' 

PRINCE ALBERT 




Band Plays at Millersburg 

On Monday, April 5, the L. V. C. 
band journeyed to Millersburg to pre- 
sent a concert in the Millersburg High 
School auditorium. It will be remem- 
bered that Jack Schuler of the class 
of '36 is now supervisor of music in 
the Millersburg school. 

Next week, two engagements await 
the band. On Tuesday evening the 
boys journey to Ephrata, and on Fri- 
day is the home concert to be pre- 
sented from the conservatory stage 
as a part of the annual spring music 
festival to be held on that day. 

The trip to Red Lion, which had 
been scheduled for Thursday, April 
IS, has been postponed until a later 
date. 



WELL, SON, THAT'S JUST HORSE -SENSE- 
PRINCE ALBERT DOESN'T BITE THE 
TONGUE -EVER - BECAUSE THE 
1 * BITE" IS TAKEN OUT BY A 
SPECIAI_ X NO-BITE'PROCESS 



7" 



-AS FOR REAL COOL 
SMOKlN— PRINCE 
ALBERTS SCIENTIFIC 
'CRIMP CUT'TAKES 
CARE OF THAT 




JUDGE, THESE FIRST 
FEW PUFFS OF 
RA. TELL ME ALL 
THAT— AND 
MORE 



50 



TRY PRINCE ALBERT AND 
YOU'LL WONDER WHY YOU 
DIDN'T GET ABOARD THIS 
RICH,FLAVORY TOBACCO 
SOONER. ITS 'CRIMP CUT' v 

TO PACK RIGHT AND 
DRAW COOL. THE 'NO-BITE' 
PROCESS MAKES IT 
MILD AND MELLOW. 
TRY PRINCE ALBERT/ 



pipefuls of fragrant tobacco in 
every 2-oz. tin of Prince Albert 



PRINCE ALBERT 
MONEY-BACK 
GUARANTEE 

Smoke 20 fragrant pipefuls of 
Prince Albert. If you don't find 
it the mellowest, tastiest pipe 
tobacco you ever smoked, re- 
turn the pocket tin with the 
rest of the tobacco in it to us at 
any time within a month from 
this date, and we will refund 
full purchase price, plus post- 
age. ( Signed ) R. J. Reynolds 
Tobacco Company, Winston- 
Salem, North Carolina. 




am 




Nnce Albert- 



4 



I 



PAGE FOUR 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, APRIL 8, 1937 



Conservatory To Hold 
Fifth Music Festival 



Band and Glee Club to Give 
Two Performances. De- 
lightful Program Planned 

On next Friday afternoon and evening, 
the conservatory of music will present 
its fifth annual music festival. This year's 
fete promises to be outstanding in va- 
riety and interest. 

Two delightful concerts will be given. 
In the afternoon the glee club will offer 
a program of sacred and secular music 
at four o'clock. In the evening at eight 
o'clock, the college band will present the 
program which is attracting such favor- 
able comments on the tours the band has 
made to neighboring communities. 

On the afternoon program are three 
groups of three numbers to be sung by 
the full chgrus of voices of the glee club. 

The first group of numbers consists of 
the choral adaptations of "O Sacred 
Head," "Praise to the Lord," and a light- 
er number, "Winter and Spring." Mari- 
anne Treo will then play Von Goen's 
"Romance," and Popper's "Gavotte-" 
Mildred Gangwer will also sing "My 
Heart at Thy Sweet Voice" by Saint- 
Saens. 

The second group of numbers contains 
"As by the Streams of Babylon," "Dark 
Water," and the "Italian Street Song" 
from "Naughty Marietta." This group 
is followed by marimba solos played by 
Emily Kindt. They are "Melodie" by 
Charpentier and "Cossack Revel" by 
Tschakoff. Donald Worley will also sing 
"The Green Eyed Dragon" by Charles 
and" When I Think Upon the Maidens" 
by Head. 

The concluding group of the glee club 
will be "Two Kings," "All in the April 
Evening" and the "Hallelujah Chorus" 
from the "Messiah." 

Accompanists are Sara Light and 
Anita Patschke. 

The band concert opens with a march, 
"His Honor" by Fillmore to be followed 
by the overture, "Tannhauser." 

Earl Unger will then play as a trumpet 
solo "The Bride of the Waves" by 
Clarke. This is followed by a Rimsky- 
Korsakoff medley of excerpts from his 
operas. 

Next to appear is "A Childhood Fan- 
tasy" by Lillya. This is succeeded by the 
favorite of last year's concerts, "Mili- 
tary Escort in Five Ways-" 

Following intermission is the march, 
"Colonel Bogey" by Alford. A clarinet 
ensemble will then play a well-known 
theme, "Funiculi, Funicula." 

Then is a paraphrase of a waltz song 
from the show "The Chocolate Soldier." 
It is "My Hero." 

"The Grasshopper's Dance," a number 
arranged for piano and band, will follow 
with Robert Clippinger at the piano. 

Concluding the program is a modern 
rhapsody, "Deep Purple," by Peter de 
Rose. 

Professor Rutledge says we may be 
assured of a good concert, for the band 
possesses better balance than formerly, 
it present a more interesting program, 
and, all in all, will present the numbers 
in a way which will appeal to the popular 
mind. 

Tickets may be secured for twenty- 
five cents per concert or forty cents for 
both performances. 



FACULTY NOTES 



Dr. and Mrs. O. E, Reynolds spent 
their Easter Vacation visiting their par- 
ents, who live near Bloomington, 111. 

* # # 

Saturday, April 3, Mrs. Andrew Ben- 
der directed "An Act of Up to Date 
Grand Opera" which was presented at 

the Lebanon Woman's Club. 

# # • 

Dr. L. L. Lietzau, who is president 
of the local organization of university 
women, attended tffie meeting of the 
American Association of University Wo- 
men which was held in Georgia, March 
15 to 19. 



It Isn't Done 



It's probably just our morbid curios- 
ity that brings us out again, but we had 
to be in at the finale. The 1M tells us 
that this is the last issue to be officially 
cranked out by the present staff; and we 
decided to be found with our feet up on 
the desk after our successors had quiet- 
ly applied the chloroform. Ergo, along 
with the Spring breezes and the raw- 
weed, Villiann again rears his ugly pan 
just long enough to croak a swan-song. 
Then we'll tramp back to our two-room 
(all modern conveniences) light-house- 
keeping telephone booth. 

• 

The guy Who said that he went to 
Hershey on Monday to harangue the 
strikers on the rights of the proletariat 
didn't harangue one whit. He just stood 
by very quietly and watched people sit 
on roofs while the American sweet-tooth 
turned sour. And he did not receive, as 
a matter of fact, a telegram from J . L. 
Lewis asking him to address the sit- 
downers. Had he done so, his father 
(the guy's) would have muidered him ! 
Boiled-down: the fellow wrote to Big- 
Wig Lewis, but the latter ignored him. 
(Just ring Men's Dorm for our handy 
Uebunking Service.) 

• 

The Wig and Buckle Knock-Down- 
And-Drag-Out Crew did the lighting at 
the Lebanon Community Concert last 
Friday night. Carola Gitana (Miss) 
turned out to be a very regular fella, in 
spite of her mother's warning that, "My 
daughter, she goes crazy — she knocks 
over props — when she is on the stage!" 

Schmidt remained near his chair at 
the switchboard all evening, ready to 
collapse into it at the drop of a fan; — 
in her last recital La Gitana, after a 
fast exit, landed in an electrician's lap. 
No luck. 

Which prompts us to dust off a note 
jotted on a cue-sheet at Carola (no re- 
lation) Goya's recital last year. That 
lady displayed the ultimate in cast-iron 
nonchalance when, in the middle of a 
number, she discovered that her — sliall 
we say pamtalons? — had parLetl from 
their moorings and were heading South. 
The boys had to be wheeled home ! 

P. S. — Before your curosity has you 
setting lire to the furniture, we'll add 
that the lady clutched one hip firmly 
and finished out the dance with very 
few of the audience any the wiser as the 
castanets clanked on. 

• 

The Column's Congrats to Ruth Buck 
upon her election as Mayday Maid of 
Honor. Ditto, and nice work, Lois, upon 
your getting the Queenship. No such 
word as "Queenship?" So what? So you 
get the idea. (Aside to the Waiter 
Force: How're we doin', boys?) 

• 

Someone asked Raymie Smith what he 
thought of the Hershey sitdown. Piped 
Raymie, "The C. I. O. will probably go 
out like the Yo-Yo." Nice phrase-turn- 
ing, boy! 

• 

Before leaving you definitely, (cheers 
from the Gallery) we give you, dear cli- 
ents, a riddle such as will CAUSe the La 
Vie press to strip its gears. Is there a 
clear path to the door? Okay, hang onto 
your hats ! 

"A train driven by a Norwegian engi- 
neer leaves Harrislburg and is headed 
for Lebanon. On the very same track a 
train, driven by a drunken engineer 
leaves Lebanon and is headed for Ilar- 
risburg. The two trains never collide. 
Why?" Before you can bark your usual 
"wiio cares?!", we'll tell you that: 
"Norse is Norse and souse is souse, and 
never the twain shall meet.'" And we're 
leaving town. 

• 

It was fun while it lasted. 
It is done. . . . 

Pilliawn (or AimoUXe transposed, with- 
out the "e"). 



Kalo's Dinner Dance 
Is Complete Success 

Hershey Hotel Is Scene of 
Gala Celebration of 60th 
Anniversary 

The recent Dinner Dance of Kappa 
Lambda Sigma was definitely the most 
successful that the society has ever held. 
On Saturday evening, March 20, in Ho- 
tel Hershey, the finest modern hotel in 
the Last, Kalo and their guests dined 
and danced in the luxurious Spanish at- 
mosphere which the hotel offers. At eight 
o'clock the dinner, with choice Hershey 
Farms Milk Fed Turkey as the main 
course, was served, and during the meal 
the diners enjoyed the music of the 
orchestra of Al Shirey. After the last 
course had been served the group pro- 
ceeded to the ballroom and the dancing 
of the evening was under way. Only 
favorable comments were heard concern- 
ing the brand of music furnished by 
Al Shirey, whose orchestra featured a 
splendid vocalist and an electric guitar. 

Each lady received a Chase Binnacle 
lamp as a favor, a charming yet practi- 
cal article, and the dance programs were 
made of a mother-of-pearl cover under 
which was a gold-leaf background upon 
which was impressed the crest of the so- 
ciety. 

Kalos greeted many of their Alumni 
brothers at the dance and all the alumni 
congratulated the society members for 
their most successful efforts in further- 
ing the splendid reputation which the so- 
ciety enjoys for its annual Dinner- 
Dance. Midnight ended the best of all 
Kalo Anniversaries. 

The Alumni present were: — Dr. Rus- 
sell Morgan, Boyd Sponaugle, Robert 
Carrell, William Kirkpatriek, Frederick 
Gruber, Harry Gruber, Mike Kanoff, 
Lelloy Miller, John Loos, Charles 
Hauck, Anthony Jagnesak, Carl 1/ong, 
David Yake, Paul Hershey, Robert Ed- 
wards, and Albert Anderson. 



Women Debaters Travel 
To Penn State College 

Last Thursday two members of the 
negative team of the women's debating 
association represented Lebanon Valley 
College in a debate with the Pennsylva- 
nia State College women. Mrs. Stokes 
and Grace Naugle, manager of women's 
debating, accompanied the team to State 
College. The women who debated were 
Belle Mulhollcn and Louise Saylor. Since 
most of the home debaters at State Col- 
lege are held as extension debates off 
campus, the debaters drove to Osceola 
Mills, where the debate was held in the 
town high school. An appreciative au- 
dience of approximately a hundred per- 
sons — mostly high school students — re- 
ceived all the speakers very well. 

Tonight the last debate of the season 
will be held. Lebanon Valley women 
will meet Kutztown State Teachers Col- 
lege women in Annville and in Kutztown 
to discuss the minimum wage question. 
The L. V. C. negative team, consisting 
of Belle Mulhollen and Theresa Stefan 
will debate here in Delphian Hall at 
7 :45 P- m. 

The women debaters have been judged 
twice this season — once by a critic judge 
and once by three judges. The occa- 
sions of these decisions were debates 
against Elizabethtown, and in both cases 
the decisions were given to Lebanon Val- 
ley. 



For Sale 




ONE MANDOLIN— good 


as new 


— Forced to sell. One 


lesson 


given free. Also book 


of in- 


structions. 




LOUIS E. STRAUB 




Room 308 




Men's Dorm 





The New Books 

A Romany Life should appeal to Hie 
gipsy in all of us. It is the life story 
of the author, Gipsy l'etulengro, told 
in his own words. It tells of his Spartan 
early days, of peddling and •"dukkerin, ' 
of spells good and evil, of his life on 
the ro>ad, anion};' American negroes and 
in shops — and linally of ins return to 
freedom. This book is filled with strange 
and interesting information about the 
gipsies — people who travel forever with 
no definite goal in view. We learn of 
the wonderful art of gipsy healing, to- 
gether with the gipsy mode of life — re- 
lations between men and women, mar- 
riage customs, superstitions, codes, 
charms, etc. Unlike other gipsies, the 
author was educated in England, though 
he lived also in Roumania and America. 
This book presents a panorama of a life 
as curious as it is fascinating. 

Introduction to Religious Education is 
a comprehensive discussion of religious 
education, written by 27 authors teach- 
ing education, religion, sociology, and 
allied subjects in colleges throughout the 
country. Its purpose is not only to in- 
troduce the student to the whole field 
of religious education, but also to show 
him its value, and give him practical 
points on various phases of the work. 
It covers such subjects as modern de- 
mands for religious education; psychol- 
ogy of religious education; methods in 
teaching religion; leadership in religious 
education; and considers the place of 
the home, the Church, the Sunday School, 
young people's socie ies, missionary or- 
ganizations, etc., in the life of today. 
Dr. J. M. Price, the general editor, is 
Director of Schools of Religious Educa- 
tion, Southwestern Baptist Theological 
Seminary; the associate editors are Dr. 
L. L. Carpenter and J. H. Chapman. 



The GREEN TERRACE 
Restaurant 

FULL COURSE DINNERS 

85c 

Banquets and Parties Solicited 
Phone Annville — 130 



PARKER PENS 
Esbenshade's Book Store 

38 N. 8th St., Lebanon, Pa. 



Compliments of 

A. & P. STORE 

C. H. SHEARER, Mgr. 

TRAINING SCHOOL 



for School Supples and 
Books of ail Kinds Go To : 

BOLLMAN'S 

628 Cumberland Street 
LEBANON, PA. 



Men's New Spring Neck w 
Polo Shirts 
Men's, Women's and Child- 

White Oxfords **** 

JOHN HIRSH 

WAGNER and SHAUD, ^ 



We are proud of our line of 
merchandise which includes a 
pletc stock of 




duality 
com. 



YARDLEY ITEMS 



and 



Parker Fountain Pens and Pencil 

Diehl Drug Store 

103 W. Main St., Annvill e< p a 



D. L. SAYLOR & 
SONS 

Contractors 

Lumber and Coal 

ANNVILLE, PENNA. 



KREAMER BROS. 

Furniture 
Floor Coverings 
Electric Refrigerators 
Hoover Electric Sweepers 
Electric Washing Machines 

RCA Radios 
FUNERAL DIRECTORS 
Phone 144 ANNVILLE, PA. 



Meals Served Daily 

Best Sundaes in Town with 
Home Made Ice Cream 
Sandwiches, Cigarettes, Candy 

C. D. BRUNNER 

E. Main St. ANNVILLE, PA. 



Complete Your Food 
Supply For That Midnight 
Lunch By Stopping At 

FINK'S BAKERY 



We sell all types of baked products 
at all hours. 



CLOTHINGOF QUALITY 

J. S. BASHORE 

Lebanon , 





'Start the day 

In the Modern way. 

Breakfast at the Penn**'' 



THE PENNWAY 




Hail to the 
Queen! 




it Colkaiennt 



So Long, 
Chief! 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 




ANNVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA, THURSDAY, APRIL 15, 1937 



No. 1 



1 1 C. Represented 
At State Conference 

- R . C. GROUPS PRESENT 

u del Legislators Propose; 
Some Dispose; All Have a 
Good Time 



International Relations Club and 
mon Valley College were again rep- 
ented April 9, 10, and 11 at Harris- 
^ when four hundred students in 
Pennsylvania colleges conducted a "mod- 
e p legislature. The model assembly was 
£ activity of the Intercollegiate Con- 
ference on Government of which Miss 
Genevieve Blatt, of Pittsburgh, is execu- 
te director. The local delegation con- 
j^d of Helen Bartlett, Mary Albert, 
Betty Bender, Marlin Bowers, Gerald 
Bittinger, J«an Harnish, Julia Johnson, 
Charles Kinney, Pauline Leininger, The- 
odore Loos, Eleanor Lynch, Belle Mul- 
hollen, Henry Schott, Calvin Spitler, 
Theresa Stefan, and Joseph Thomas. 
Tem ple boasted the largest delegation, 
with 2!) members at the session. Penn 
State and Dickinson also had large num- 
bers of representatives. 
The delegates were each assigned to 
one of ten committees on such subjects 
as public utilities, collective bargaining, 
labor, natural resources, etc. Bills were 
introduced and dismissed in committee 
meetings, and if acted upon favorably 
were introduced at the general sessions 
the next day. 
The attitude of students in Pennsyl- 
vania colleges today seems to be decid- 
edly liberal; at least, as evidenced by 
the bills passed in the unicameral assem- 
bly. Some of the more interesting bills 
included legalization of horse racing and 
Sunday fishing; establishing of voting 
machines in all election precincts; mini- 
mum age limit for public school attend- 
ance set at eighteen years; outlawing 
nf company union; prohibition of trans- 
lation of strike breakers; and legali- 
{Cvntiimed on Page 2, Column 5) 



UG.A. Board Holds 
Banquet at Hershey 

S Ment Government Body 
^presses Appreciation To 
Authorities 



\ 

,tu knt Go 

»> the dining hall of the Hershey 



, annual banquet of the Woman s 
indent r ... 
, Government Association was 



. •ttunity Building on Thursday even- 
. April 7. Owing to the fact that 

Vke mU( l1 com P etition f rom the 
Het y team ' wlln were homing a ban- 
\ m ^ e sarne room, there were no 
^thn CCClles froni an y <)f the members. 
H a UCk ' Pr€sident of the W. S. G. A., 
tr esse ^ s 10rt speech of welcome and ex- 
tent apprecia t'on of the board and 
^dej, !° ^ rs - Green, who is retiring 
tt^| I this y^r. Dr. Lynch and Mrs. 
Nti thaill <ed the board for its co- 

Vrl in aU matters - 
* meli 0n ler SUm Ptuous repast included 
\ p r COcl<t ail, bouillon, steak, green 
S mij neh fries > salad, ice cream, cof- 

L ^' th and ' ° f course ' Hers hey kiss- 
■ Cr N U « nieni hcrs and faculty guests 
Slty fit f( »r a king." Among the 
W ^ e sent were Dr. and Mrs. C. A. 
%r, ^ and Mrs. A. H. M. Stone- 
\ rs - Mary Green and Miss Liet- 



Y. M. Pool Tournament 
Begins First Round 

With the advent of spring cue-ball en- 
thusiasts are gathering in the "Y" room 
to witness some fine demonstrations of 
pool shooting. Competition is rather 
keen in the tournament which is annually 
sponsored by the YMCA. Thus far no 
predictions can be made as none of the 
rounds has been entirely completed. 
Outstanding so far is Warren Moyer who 
has defeated Rogers, Kress, and Herman 
to advance to the semi-finals. Wilbur 
Shroyer has also advanced to the semi- 
finals by defeating Poloniak, Lester and 
Bulota. 

The play is conducted by the process 
of elimination. Winners from first round 
play are paired and so the process con- 
tinues through the semi-finals to fhe 
finals where the winner is the champion. 



May Day Preparations 
Promise Colorful Scene 



Spectacular Dances, Musical 
Numbers, Varied Costumes 
To Feature Annual Event 



Gather round and hear the barker 
calling out loudly the attractions of the 
carnival. He is announcing the Lebanon 
Valley College May Day, to be held on 
the college campus, Saturday, May 8, 
I 937> at 2 p. m. The entire performance 
will have as its motif the carnival, with 
its side-shows, shouting and gleeful 
crowds, flower and balloon venders, pink 
lemonade and all of its other charac- 
teristics. Pastel streamers in keeping 
with the carnival will float from all high 
points, and the queen's court will be 
shaded by canopies of blue, gold and 
green. The participants will gather to- 
gether informally and join in social danc- 
ing until the signal is given for the en- 
trance of the processon and they will 
drop back to make way for the queen- 
The processional will include the May 
Queen, Lois Harbold, the Maid of Hon- 
or, Ruth Buck, and the court consisting 
of Gayle Mountz, Grace Naugle, Sara 
Meckley, Eleanor Lynch, Marjorie Smith, 
and Romaine Stiles, and the May pole 
dancers. Upon reaching her throne the 
queen will be presented gifts by the class 
presidents; and the barker of the car- 
nival will introduce the performers. The 
program will include the following num- 
bers: a pirate dance by a group of 
freshmen and a solo dance by Jean Mc- 
Keag, a ball dance by the sophomores, a 
cowboy song by the college men's chorus, 
a cowboy and cowgirl dance by the 
sophomores, an oriental number intro- 
duced by the men's chorus in the market 
(Continued on Page 4, Column 3) 



Noted Speakers Visit 
Lebanon Valley Campus 

SPECIAL BANQUET HELD 

Widely-known Religious Edu- 
cators Lecture to Interested 
Groups of Students 

Three nationally known speakers, the 
Rev. Leslie B. Moss, D.D., Secretary of 
the Foreign Missions Conference of 
North America, the Rev. Luman J. Sha- 
fer, Litt.D., Associate Secretary of the 
Board of Foreign Missions, and the Rev. 
E. Pearce Hayes, Missionary of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church in Futsing 
District and Fukien Province, China, 
visited the Lebanon Valley College cam- 
pus Wednesday afternoon and evening 
to lead discussion groups and to lecture 
to interested students. 

Dr. Moss has represented for thirteen 
years more than one hundred foreign 
mission boards and societies with head- 
quarters in the United States and Can- 
ada- He studied at Denison University, 
Newton Theological Seminary, and Har- 
vard University. In 191 5 he was profes- 
sor of Education and History at the 
University of Nanking, China, Registrar 
of the University, and Dean of the Ju- 
nior College. On returning to America 
in 1922 he organized and became the 
first Executive Secretary of the New 
York office for the China Union Univer- 
sities, representing four interdenomina- 
tional universities in China. 

Dr. Shafer is a graduate of Rutgers 
University and of New Brunswick Theo- 
logical Seminary. He went to Japan in 
1912 and remained there except for oc- 
casional furloughs until 1935. While in 
Japan he was Principal of Ferris Semi- 
nary, the first girls' school established 
in that country. The Emperor of Japan 
honored him for his share in the recon- 
struction of Yokohoma, after the great 
earthquake of 1923. On his departure 
the Governor of the Province came to 
the steamer to express the appreciation of 
the Japanese people for his work in 
Christian Education. Because of his 
many years of experience he is quite 
qualified to discuss the situation in Ja- 
(Continued on Page 2, Column 1) 



Change in Easter Vacation 



By action of the faculty the Easter 
Vacation for 1938 will begin on the 
Friday afternoon preceding Palm Sun- 
day and continue until noon of the 
following Easter Sunday. It is be- 
lieved that this period will be more 
agreeable to the student body than the 
past arrangement. 



Newspapermen Inherit Style Book 



For the past several years, editors of 
La Vik have recognized the need of a 
style book in their work to reduce rou- 
tine editorial duties and provide an au- 
thoritative common source of Informa- 
tion for reporters. However, none of 
them wen' able to give concrete ex,. res 
sion to their ideas until David Yake, 
•86, compiled 8 mass of information from 
various sources and proceeded to adapl 
[t to his own particular needs. Editor 
Yake never gol his book Into print, bul 

the start had been made and hiS success- 
or, Richard A. Bans, succeeded in com- 



pleting the task of adaptation and, at 
the close of his term as editor presented 
the new staff with this important aid. 
Some thirty copies of the book were dis- 
tributed on April 12, when it first made 
its appearance. 

The new style book is a small pam- 
phlet of a dozen pages containing most 
of the basic instructions and informa- 
tion necessary to the reporter on college 
newspaper work. There are no wasted 
words in its nmkeup, and its contents 
,are brief, inclusive, and to the point. It 
(Continued on Page 2, Cohrnnn 4) 



Officers Elected By 

Athletic Association 



In the election held on Thursday, April 
8, Carolyn Kohler was elected presi- 
dent of the Women's Athletic Associa- 
tion for next year. Other officers elected 
were: vice president, Dorothy Kreamer; 
corresponding secretary, Catherine Mills ; 
recording secretary, Betty Bender ; and 
treasurer, Carolyn Roberts. Sport leaders 
chosen in the same election were : hockey, 
Helen Bartlett ; archery, Lillian Zubroff ; 
basketball, Jean Houck; baseball, Es- 
ther Wise ; hiking, Mildred Haas ; vol- 
ley ball, Evelyn Miller; and tennis, 
Louise Saylor. The social program of the 
W. A. A. will be directed by Sylva Har- 
clerode who was elected secretary of ar- 
rangements. No definite plans for next 
year have been made so far. 



Dr. L. K. Ade Addresses 
Students in Chapel 

Advocates Developement of 
Individualism and Social 
Consciousness In Schools 



The. Superintendent of Public Instruc- 
tion of the Commonwealth of Pennsyl- 
vania addressed the student body of Leb- 
anon Valley College on Thursday morn- 
ing, April 8. Dr. Ade surprised the stud- 
ents with his manner of public-speaking, 
a refreshing and unexpected departure 
from the conventional. 

Dr. Ade, who has received degrees 
from many of America's foremost uni- 
versities and who served in Siberia dur- 
ing the World War, prefaced his speech 
by narrating a number of apropos 
jokes; and suddenly brought from its 
hiding place a raft of detailed notes 
which he read, interrupting himself oc- 
(Contirmed on Page 4, Column 2) 



L V. C. MEN'S TEAM 
HOLDS LAST DEBATE 



The last debate of the season for the 
men's debating teams was held on Mon- 
day evening when the Lebanon Valley 
negative met the affirmative combination 
of American University of Washington, 
D. C in a non-decision meet. The visit- 
ing speakers were Fred Boyd and Don- 
ald Creech while Charles Kinney and 
Carl Ehrhart debated for Lebanon Val- 
ley. The receiving end of the meet was 
represented by a crowd of 12 listeners, 
including the timekeepers, two visitors, 
and the chairman. 

The debating season, as concerns the 
men, has been on the whole a somewhat 
lackadaisical one, although it was en- 
livened by a one-man circus put on by 
one William Clark in the Ursinus de- 
bate on Campus. Other highlights of the 
season were the southern tour of the 
affirmative team and the New York trip 
of the negative. The debates were not 
supported as they might have been in 
the matter of attendance, but since this 
condition also exists in other colleges of 
our type the local aggregation cannot 
complain. 

Although most of the debates were 
non-decision affairs, especially those on 
Campus, nevertheless Lebanon Valley 
fared rather badly in those which were 
judged, having dropped all of them, four 
in number. 



Deeter s Hedgerowers 
Meet Expectations 

PLAY WELL PRESENTED 



Maria, Sir Toby Belch Excel- 
lently Portrayed ; Minute 
Details Cared For 



Wednesday, April 7 at 8 p. m. Jasper 
Deeter's Hedgerow Theatre players pre- 
sented Shakespeare's "Twelfth Night"' to 
an appreciative audience in the Engle 
Conservatory. 

The piesentation was typically Shakes- 
pearean with all the bouncing good fun 
included in the play's subtitle "What You 
Will" and it contained every element 
necessary to the enjoyment of the even- 
ing. The cast themselves said that they 
enjoyed playing before the Lebanon Val- 
ley audience. 

The listeners were delighted with the 
portrayal of Maria, Olivia's serving wo- 
man, of Sir Toby Belch, the lovable, 
ne'er-do-well uncle and of Malvolio, the 
butt of their tricks in Olivia's house- 
hold, the Way Maria flew about the 
stage holding so convincingly to the 
curtains and falling to the floor was ex- 
ceptionally graceful. Her mood was so 
contagious that the listeners broke into 
repeated p^iles o r laughter. Sir Toby's 
vivid representation of Shakespeare's 
character creation commanded the love 
of the audience. Sir Andrew Ague- 
cheek was also definitely Shakespearean. 
He so adequately interpreted the role of 
the meek little "yes-man" that Will him- 
self would have been charmed to see 
him. The fact that the most memorable 
personalities were the comic characters 
proves the saying that "Shakespeare's 
genius led him to comedy." 

Olivia as the haughty woman of the 
aristocracy was adequately presented. 
Her disdain for those around her was 
quite typical of her part. Viola, too, was 
ably characterized as a daring young wo- 
man in love with Duke Orsino. Her 
part was slightly unconvincing because 
she lacked a degree of warmth that we 
had expected Viola to have. 

The success of the play was due large- 
ly to the fact that the minor characters 
were so well enacted. The possibililfies 
for the part of Fabian in the play were 
small but the Fabian shown us Wednes- 
day evening was one who added much 
to the play. The sea captain was subtle; 
(Continued on Page 3, Column 2) 



L. V. C. Women 

Debate Kutztown 



A women's debate was held in 
Delphian Hall on Thursday, April 6, 
at 7:30 p. m., between the Kutztown 
affirmative and the Lebanon Valley 
negative teams. Rea Jane Morency 
and Carol Davis represented the 
Teacher's College, while Belle Mul- 
hollen and Theresa Stefan spoke for 
L. V. C. Dr. Black acted as chair- 
man of the forensic dispute on the 
question : Resolved, That Congress 
should be empowered to fix minimum 
wages and maximum hours for in- 
dustry. As usual, the audience was 
small but interested. 

Before the debate both teams were 
entertained in North Hall, and were 
guests at dinner. Margaret Holbrook, 
assistant manager of girls' debating, 
was in charge of arrangements. 



PAGE TWO 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, APRIL 15, 1937 



ESTABLISHED 1925 



A weekly publication by the Undergraduate Students of Lebanon Valley College 



EDITORIAL BOARD 

ASSOCIATE EDITOR 
Mary Louise Stoner, '38 
FEATURE EDITOR SPORTS EDITOR 

William F. Clark, '39 Roger B. Saylor, '38 

REPORTORIAL STAFF 

Clarence Lehman, '89 
Robert Long, '39 
Sarah MacEwen, '38 
Aliee Richie, '89 
Samuel Rutter, '39 
Barbara Bowman, '4<0 
Carl Ehrhart, '40 
Evelyn Evans, '40 
John Ness, '40 
Louise Savior, "40 

BUSINESS BOARD 
BUSINESS MANAGER CIRCULATION MANAGER 

Curvin N. Dellinger, '38 Ernest Weirick, '39 

ASSISTANT ASSISTANT 

Raymond Smith, '39 Warren Seehrist, '40 



Clifford Barnhart, '38 
Elizabeth Bender, '38 
Sylva Harclerode, '38 
Ernestine Jagnesak, '38 
Wanda Price, '38 
Calvin Spitler, '38 
Theresa Stefan, '38 
Howard Baier. '39 
Robert Clippinger, '39 
Thomas Guinivan, '39 



Sin*l« Coplea 5 cents 

Subscription $1.00 per year 



EnUred at the Annvllle, Pa., post office as second class matter, under the Act of 
March 3, 1879. 

Published weekly through the school year, except during holiday vacation and 
examination week. 



RIFRKIINTID FOR NATIONAL ADVERTISING BY 

National Advertising Service, Inc. 

Collt ft Publitkm Rtf 'tentative a 

420 Madison Ave New York. N. Y. 

CNICA«0 - BOSTON - SAN FRANCISCO 

Los Ansblbs - Portland Seattle 



Vol. XIV 



THURSDAY, APRIL 15, 1937 



No. 



THAT CONTRIBUTOR'S BOX AGAIN 



Whether a newspaper is to be a moulder or reflector of public 
opinion, there still exists in its pages a definite and important place 
for the opinions of its readers. These opinions are commonly pre- 
sented in the contributors columns of most papers. In the past, LA 
VIE COLLEGIENNE has featured such letters and contributions 
from, students and friends, but whether due to lack of interest or to a 
pervading illusion that to speak one's mind was to incur retaliatory 
action this column has died of literary anemia. 

It will be the policy of LA VIE to encourage expressions of 
opinion and constructive criticisms on the part of its readers in the 
way of letters to the editor. These letters may be upon any conceiv- 
able phase of college affairs that merits the general attention. The 
editor asks only that the writer be guided by a sense of the propriety 
of the situation with which he is dealing. Nothing of an obscene or 
offensive character, nor anything which 'by virtue of the publicity ac- 
corded it would operate to the detriment of the college will be print- 
ed. It should, however, be necessary to make such distinctions only 
in rare cases. 

All letters and contributions should be placed in the Contribu- 
tors Box in the library. These must be signed as evidence of good 
faith in order to appear in the paper. If requested, the editor will 
not print the author's name, nor divulge it under any circumstances. 

By this policy, LA VIE hopes to stimulate an active interest 
among the student body. The cooperation of the students is neces- 
sary, and, if given, will provide an important item necessary, to the 
success of the paper. 



HELP WANTED 



Retiring Editor 




NEWSPAPERMEN INHERIT 

STYLE BOOK 



LA VIE'S BAUS 

For students — a style book 
Who has just wound up over four 
years of active service on La Vie, be- 
ginning in his pre-freshman days. Aside 
from making important advances in the 
style and form Of the paper during his 
tenure of office as editor the past year, 
Baus has finally produced what has been 
merely a dream of his predecessors — a 
style book adapted to the needs of the 
La Vie staff. In this respect, he has 
placed La Vie far ahead on the road of 
progress, and reduced routine editorial 
drudgery to a minimum. 



CONSERVE DOINGS 



In order to justify its designation as a news paper, LA VIE 
must print news. If it does not, it must assume the alternative role of 
a news review. The former policy is by far the most acceptable, since 
it will tend to make the publication more interesting and informative 
to the readers, which after all should be the aim of a good paper. 

In order to pursue this policy more thoroughly than has been 
done in the past, LA VIE asks for a prior lien on all advance inform 
matron concerning events that are to happen on the campus. In the 
case of elections or faculty actions, it asks that the information be 
reserved for its exclusive use, and not announced until it appears in 
the columns of LA VIE. The various class officers and heads of or- 
ganizations are invited to cooperate in this respect, and reserve for 
the paper exclusively, all important news of their re spective groups. 



{Continued from page 1) 



represents the latest and best trends in 
uewspaper work. 

"A work of this type cannot he ori- 
ginal," stated Baufi in reply to several 
queries, "but a vast number of changes 
were required on the original material 
to adapt it for our own use. This is just 
a beginning. Changes and alterations 
can be made, suggestions will be re- 
ceived, and the whole work may be im- 
proved upon. Practically all this infor- 
mation may be found in standard rhe- 
toric and grammar books, but in this 
form it will be at the fingertips of the 
reporter." 

The English department has express- 
ed a note of satisfaction upon the ap- 
pearance of the style book, it is an in- 
valuable aid to the writing of good read- 
able composition of any type. Several 
of the practice teachers liave asked for 
copies for use in their work. Dr. George 
G. Struble heralded the appearance of 
the style book as a milestone in the for- 
ward march of journalism at Lebanon 
Valley. So convinced was he of its val- 
ue as an aid to writers that he recom- 
mended it to all students interested in 
writing. He even went so far as to urge 
its use by freshmen English students as 
an aid in class preparation. 



Religious Activities 



The Life Work Recruit 



NOTED SPEAKERS VISIT 

LEBANON VALLEY CAMPUS 



(Continued from page 1) 



pan, China, and Manchuria. 

Rev. Hayes, a native of Hazcn, Mary- 
land, has been a Missionary since 1921. 
He studied at Johns Hopkins University, 
Drew Theological Seminary, and the 
American University of Washington, 
D. C. He was pastor in the Baltimore 



Conference before serving in China. 
While in China he was superintendent 
of both the Futsing and Yukie Districts 
serving two and one-half million people. 

These speakers are representing the 
Student Christian Movement of the Mid 

die Atlantic Region with its headquar- 
ters at Philadelphia. The aim of the or- 
ganization is to promote the Christian 
principles in the world. Their motto is 
"Christian Youth Building a New 
World." 



About forty-five couples attended the 
formal dinner and dance which was 
Sponsored by the conservatory at Hotel 
llershey on last Friday evening. 

A roast turkey dinner was served in 
the dining room of the hotel after which 
the guests adjourned to the ball room 
where a most delightful evening was 
spent dancing to the music of Bob Noll 
and his orchestra from Reading. 

The committee for the dance was er- 
roneously reported in last week's La 
Vik. The corrected list is as follows: 
Gayle Mounts, Chairman; Chester Stine- 
man, Homer Barthold, Robert Johns, 
Lucille Maberry, Robert Heckman, Ann 
Meinhardt, Jeanne Schock, and Herbert 
Strohman. 

The chaperons for the evening were 

the faculty of the conservatory. 

• » * 

On Monday evening, April 12, the fol- 
lowing students of the conservatory pre- 
sented a program for the Harmonia Cir- 
cle of Lebanon. First to appear was 
Anita Patschke who presented two pi- 
ano selections. Dorothy /-eiters favored 
the audience with two 'cello numbers. 
A group of two violin duets was next 
played by Russel llatz and John Zettle- 
moyer, while the two vocalists on the 
program were Jean Marberger, soprano, 
and Donald Wo. I y, tenor. Fach sang 
two numbers. Accompanists for the ev- 
ening were Dorothy Yeakel and Robert 
Clippinger. 

• # # 

Preparations and plans for the spring- 
music festival are nearing completion. 
Professor Wullcdge has just announced 
the addition of a new attraction to the 
band program to be given in the evening 
at eight o'clock. 

As a special feature, the band will 
present Elizabeth Ana Peterson and 
Jackie Rotunda, two talented drummers 
from the Cornwall Sehoo] band, to play- 
several drum specialties. 

Both drummers are students in the 
Sixth grade and show unusual ability on 
their instruments. 

Tickets for both the glee club program 
in the afternoon and the band concert in 
the evening ma be secured from any 
student of the conservatory for twenty- 
live cents per concert, or forty cents for 
both. 

• • • 

At the studio recital presented Tues- 
day evening, a number of premier ap- 
pearances were made. 



James Keiter, a special student, played 
"Showers of Gold" by Boullion for his 
selection on the clarinet. 

Ruth llershey played MacDowell's "To 
a Water Lily" and Debussy's "Jardins 
sous la Plule." These were presented on 
the piano. 

The first vocalist to appear was Raj 
Zimmerman, baritone. He sang a Handel 
air, "Where F'er You Walk" and Mana- 
Zucca's famous "I Love Life." 

John Miller appeared as organist for 
the first time by playing Bach's "Air in 
D." 

On the French horn Isabelle Cox play- 
ed "My Sweet Repose" by Franz Schu- 
bert. Following this selection was a 
"Larghetto" of Handel's played by 
Kathryn Yingst on the violin. 

Piano selections, "Lotus Land" by 
Scott and "In a Chinese City" by Nie- 
mann, as played by Rose Tschopp fol- 
lowed. 

Minerva Hoffman, soprano, closed the 
program by r singing "Down in the For- 
est" by Ronald, "Have You Seen But a 
Whyte Lily Grow?" and "My Love is a 
Fisherman." 

Accompanists were Ruth Buck, Rita 
Mos'her, Anita Patschke and Mary Ann 
Catroneo. 



held their weekly meeting hist "pi""' 11 ''' 1 ' 
evening in North Hall Parlor 
P. M. Thomas Guinivan was j n ' N 
of the meeting. Harold Bear^T^ 
led the group in the devotions 
the service Daniel Shearer sang ^ 
''An Evening 1'rayer." ' s °lo, 

Dr. W. A. Wilt led the gro . 
round table discussion centering ' ft 4 
the theme, What In Success? ^ ^ 



versy revolved around whether 
was decided by "pull." The 
responded quite freely to the disc ^ 
The closing prayer was offered I '° n ' 
wood Needy. ^ '* 

* * * 

Sunday morning and evening L el) 
Valley College was represented hy ^ 
deputations to the State .Street p - t ° 
Brethren Church, of Harrisburg 
which Dr. A. K. Wier is the p^ 
During the Sunday School period Tho 
as Guinivan taught the Young Men's B' 
ble Class, while Daniel Shearer spoke t 
a young ladies' class. 

Thomas Guinivan, the representath 
of this church in L. V. C, was in ^ 
of the worship services. Daniel Shearer 
offered the prayer. Special numbers were 
rendered by a string-trio composed of 
Dorothy Yeakel, Dorothy Zeiters, and 
John Zettlemoyer. Virginia Niessner 
rendered a vocal solo. The message of 
the morning was ably given by p au j 
Horn. His subject was Faith in Chml 
taken from Hebrews 12:2. 

The special speaker In the Christian 
Endeavor Society, Elwood Needy, talked 
on Stewardship. For the evening service 
Needy led the congregation in prayer. 
.Jean Marberger sang two selections ac- 
companied by Amy Meinhardt at the 
piano. The evening message, Youth Liv. 
ing Creatively, was presented by Daniel 
Shearer. 



L. V C. REPRESENTED 

AT STATE CONFERENCE 



(Continued from page 1) 



zation of birth control and sterilization. 
Bills to legalize sit-down strikes, state 
ownership and operation of coal lands 
and abortion operations were defeated 
by close votes. The sit-down strike ques- 
tion caused the longest discussions dur- 
ing the session, with the anti-«it(lowners 
winning the issue, 91 to 90. This shows 
a dicisively liberal trend in student opin- 
ions today. 




''What does it say?" 

"It says Long Distance rates are 
reduced ALL DAY SUNDAY 
and after seven every night." 

• Distant friends are less than 
a minute away by telephone- 

THE BELL TELEPHONE COMPANY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, APRIL 15, 1937 



PAGE THREE 



es 



at 4 
> 



.ut er 



* in , 
Co <% 

cu ssi 0n , 

b y ei." 
b y two 

United 
lr & of 
Pastor. 
Thom. 
*'s Bi- 
Poke tu 

-ntative 
charge 
Shearer 
'rs were 
^sed of 
rs, and 
'iessner 
sage of 
F Paul 

hristian 
, talked 
service 
prayer, 
wis at. 
at the 
th Liv- 
Daniel 

ENCE 



ligation. 
5, state 
[ lands, 
efeated 
;e ques- 
jis duf- 
lowners 
5 shows 
it opin- 



gports Shots 

aC j 1 Emerson Metoxen will have a 
record to uphold when he leads his 
fr lC to Reading next week to play 
c ' ia r ight. His two previous nines have 
"^'iled a total of 15 victories and seven 
c0 '^ a ts against collegiate foes, a re- 
^ ■ 4 showing to say the least. In 



(parable 

' Tost only one, that being two years 



games against Albright his teams 

haVe wrien Bill Smith dropped a ii-io 
ag °ision at Reading while trying to get 
life out of a dead pitching arm. 
^"T season Paul Billett and John Tin- 
11 each recorded a victory for Lebanon 
Valley over the Lions ; 

Some of our future opponents 
on the diamond are expecting to 
lace formidable teams on the 
fie ld this year. Gettysburg, in 
particular, has extremely bright 
prospects since they have lost 
on ly three regulars from the out- 
fit that won the Eastern Penn- 
sylvania Intercollegiate League 
title last season. Their six-man 
pitching staff is intact, so Ecker, 
the man who shut us out with 
one hit early last season will 
have a chance to repeat. This 
year we do not play Gettysburg 
until May 4 so the players will 
not be able to use last year's ex- 
cuses, lack of practice and winter 

weather, in case we lose. 
» * # 

According to Moravian's student pub- 
lication, they too will have a fine base- 
ball team featured by strong pitching. 
Last year they dropped a 3-1 decision to 
Johnny Tindall in a tight game so they 
will be out to do plenty of damage when 
they come to Annville on May 12. Re- 
ports from Selinsgrove, home of the 
Susquehanna University Crusaders are 
not quite so awe-inspiring. They lost 
several key performers from the outfit 
that gave Lebanon Valley a drubbing 
last year. 

# » » 

The Drexel team went on a 
more or less successful southern 
tour during the Easter Recess so 
they should be well conditioned 
if nothing else. Last week the 
Dragons gave the University of 
Pennsylvania tossers a scare by 
holding their better-known oppo- 
nents to a 4-3 score. The last 
three Lebanon Valley-Drexel 
games resulted in Blue and 
White victories by at least ten 
runs. Is it time for the worm to 
turn or will history repeat itself? 
The answer will be forthcoming 
on May 26 if weather permits. 
» • • 

The exhibition game with the Palmyra 
A- A. on Friday will be a sort of pre- 
VUe as to what can be expected from 
Metoxen's team this season. Last 
SDri ng the semi-pros beat us 6-4 in an 
ear 'y season game. A return engage- 
men t resulted in a 5-5 deadlock. More 
lm Portant than the winning of this im- 
pending game will be the discovering of 

e relative merits of the players in 
^Petition. 

• • • 

Charley Gelbert, Lebanon Val- 
ey s one representative in major 
ea gue baseball, is all set for a 
ne season with the Cincinnati 
* eds of the National League. 

Wring the winter he was traded 
c/k^' kouis to the Cincinnati 
• According to reports eman- 
tf m g from the Tampa, Florida 
tQ aini ng camp of the Reds he is 
s ec Start tne season as regular 
^ c ond baseman, replacing last 
aft ars guardian of that sack 
e er a k een battle. Some of the 
b e r t e , rts doubt the ability of Gel- 
of s le g to withstand the rigors 
*ilU ryday play, but at least he 

fair ' 3 chance ' His leg was 
h Unti ^ several years ago in a 

Put g acc ident and seemingly 
atl end to his baseball career. 



Diamond Performers 
Prepare For Debut 

FIRST GAME ON FRIDAY 



Palmyra Encounter Expected 
To Make or Break Several 
New Men 



Chief Metoxen's varsity baseball can- 
didates resumed intensive practice this 
week after being forced to halt activities 
while the rain had its inning the latter 
part of last week. At present the Chief 
is spending most of his energy in lining 
up the best infield possible. All the lead- 
ing competitors are being carefully 
coached as to handling ground balls and 
getting quick and accurate pegs to first 
base. Poloniak apparently is to be the 
regular first-sacker. He has shown un- 
usual ability in gathering in anything 
that is tossed in his general direction. 
Ralph. Billett wih undoubtedly hold 
down second base again this season. His 
play last spring left little to be desired, 
and there is every reason to expect him 
to be even better this spring. The left 
side of the infield is quite unsettled as 
yet. Adolph Capka is virtually certain 
of starting in one of the two positions 
but which one is unknown to the public 
to date. At present he is handicapped by 
an infected finger so he may be unable to 
play against the Palmyra A. A. on Fri- 
day. Danny Seiverling may be the short- 
stop. He has a powerful arm, but he has 
several fielding flaws which must be 
ironed out. The coach is giving him much 
attention. Gordon Davies and Warren 
Brown are the other infield possibilities. 

The outfield is quite unsettled. Mar- 
shall Frey has a fine chance since he is 
showing considerable batting ability. 
Jack Moller, Bob Artz, Bob Brown and 
a few others are also in the running. 
Brown, while only a .210 hitter at Le- 
moyne High School, has seemingly over- 
come that batting weakness and may be- 
come one of the regular gardeners. At 
any rate, after the exhibition game with 
the Palmyra A. A. on Friday Coach Me- 
toxen will have a far better knowledge 
of what his men can do under fire. 



DEETER'S HEDGEGROWERS 

MEET EXPECTATIONS 



(Continued from page 1) 



his character in the production was 
made vivid by his changing moods. This 
fact gave him an unforeseen unity. 

Duke Orsino's appearance was just 
what the audience had expected. He ren- 
dered a true picture of the rather fickle 
aristocrat. Feste, the fool, was not in 
appearance what we expected but his 
acting was excellent and he remained 
Feste throughout the play. 

The Hedgerow Theatre made much of 
the seemingly insignificant details. 
Shakespeare has given so few stage di- 
rections that it is difficult to imagine 
anyone but a genius such as Mr. Deeter 
adding in the Elizabethan mood the ar- 
tistic touches he does. In the play, for 
example, only a line or two of the songs 
were given, but the actors produced such 
remarkable results as the trio of Feste, 
Sir Toby, and Sir Andrew singing to- 
gether. . ,- 

The players! customary stage is but 
,i R hteen feet long and their hall seats 
only 150 persons. Knowing tins it is 
amazing with what ease and confidence 
the cast put on "Twelfth Night." When 
Viola or Feste leaned placidly upon the 
walls at the front of the stage and when 
Sir Toby drew the red curtains in the 
chapel about himself it veritably seemed 
as though they must have been doing it 
all their lives in just that fashion. 

Much credil is due Dr. Wallace, Mr. 
Clements, and the group of students who 
handled the selling of tickets for the 
vv , u -,n audience they produced. It proved 
t0 be time well spent and the campus 
hopes that more such productions may be 
liven at Lebanon Valley in the future. 



New Faces To Crash 

Into Tennis Lineup 

Balked by cold and unsettled weather, 
L. V. C.'s 1937 tennis team aspirants face 
a prodigious task. In the space of less 
than a week's time, these netmen must 
smooth out the rough spots in their 
games in preparation for the match with 
Elizabethtown College, scheduled for 
Tuesday, April 20, on the L. V. C. courts. 
Coach Stevenson will be forced to groom 
several new players to step into the 
positions vacated by "Wib" Shroyer, 
who is ineligible this year, Dick Ax and 
"Hib" Nye, both of whom have graduat- 
ed. Although the loss of these players 
will weaken the team somewhat, pros- 
pects for a successful season were bright- 
ened by the showing of freshman 
"Steure" Shapiro in last fall's tourna- 
ment. Then, too, Captain Homer Don- 
moyer is expected to wind up his college 
career with another brilliant string oi 
victories. 

Two other men who played impressive- 
ly in the fall tourney were "Sheen" 
Shenk and "Jake" Umberger. Shenk is 
a seasoned veteran, and Umberger, who 
saw some action op. last year's squad, 
improved vastly during the summer and 
should give opponents plenty of trouble 
this spring. Art Evelev, Rog Saylor, 
and Claire Snell are other outstanding 
candidates. 



ALUMNI NOTES 



President Lynch's Activities 



Sal unhiy, April 17 — Dedicatory Ad- 
dress, Palmyra High School. 

Sunday, April 18 — Education Day 
Address — Chambersburg U. B. 
Church. 

Tuesday, April 20 — Address the As- 
sembly at the Camden, N. J., 
High School. 

Friday, April 23 — Address the High 
School Assembly at Trenton, 
N. J. 



The alumni of the New York district 
met in the Y. M. C. A. of Newark, N. 
J., last Saturday evening for dinner and 
a program. Dr. and Mrs. S. Hi Deriek- 
son and Dr. and Mrs. Andrew Bender 
represented the college at the meeting 
which was well attended. Dr. Perickson 
gave a very interesting talk in which he 
reported the activities and improve- 
ments of the college for the past year. 
He then showed motion pictures of col- 
lege activities. 

» • * 

Mr. and Mrs. Glen E. Bendigo, of 
Reinerton, announce the birth of a son 
on Monday, April 5. Mr. Bendigo is of 
the class of '30 and Mrs. Bendigo, who 
was the former Leah Harpel,. is of the 
class of '29. 

* * * 

James H. Leathern, '32, has been ac- 
corded an unusual scholastic honor of 
merit at Princeton Universtiy, Prince- 
ton, N. J., where he is taking a post- 
graduate course in preparation for spe- 
cialised work in the study of human ana- 
tomy. Mr. Leathern has been awarded 
the "Charlotte Elizabeth Proctor Fellow- 
ship in Biology." 

# * # 

The Lebanon School Board has elected 
the following as teachers for the coming 
year: R. Leslie Saunders, '35, who has 
had two years experience at Cornwall 
high school, to serve as teacher and di- 
rector of instrumental music in elemen- 
tary grades, junior and senior high 
schools, a new position in the school sys- 
tem; Mary A. Kauffman, '36, who spent 
last year at Millersville State Teachers 
College, and who will teach in the ele- 
mentary grades; and Elvin B. Fake, '35, 
who will teach in the junior high school. 



What They Say 



Question — Why do college students 
drink? 



F.d'tor's note : This question has been 
asked in accordance with the request of 
the Intercollegiate Newspaper Associa- 
tion who are conducting a survey of this 
subject. 

JOHN BROSIUS, Senior— "I believe 
students drink when they're down in the 
dumps." 

CLAIRE ADAMS, Senior— "The only 
reason I can see, is to be smart." 

LLOYD BEAMESDERFER, Junior— 
"Generally they drink to be sociable ; par- 
ticularly, because they don't know bet- 
ter." 

ERNESTINE JAGNESAK, Junior— 
"Personally, I don't know; but I'd say 
studying is responsible for sending them 
to drinking." 

RALPH LLOYD, Freshman — "It 
doesn't worry me any." 

ROBERT ARTZ, Freshman — "It 
makes people more sociable." 

CHARLES BROWN, Sophororc—"! 
can see no reason for it." 

JEAN HARNISH, Senior — "Some 
want to be smart ; others to have a good 
time." 

hin ■ 

JAMES BLACK, Freshman — "It 
causes the drinker to forget his troubles." 

ARTHUR EVELEV, Sophomore — 
"You've got me there." 

CAROLINE ROBERTS, Junior— 
"This is the wrong school to ask that 
question." 





Smoke 20 fragrant pipefuls of 
Prince Albert. If you don't find 
it the mellowest, tastiest pipe to- 
bacco you ever smoked, return 
the pocket tin with the rest of 
the tobacco in it to us at any time 
within a month from this date, 
and we will refund full purchase 
price, plus postage. (Signed) 
R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co., 
Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Copyright, 1937, R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Company 



50 



THERE'S GOOD REASON 
WHY PRINCE ALBERT IS 
SUCH A RICH, MELLOW, 
TASTV TOBACCO. PA. IS 
CRIMP CUT' FOR COOL 
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FOR PIPE SMOKERS. 



pipefuls of fragrant tobacco in 
every 2-oz. tin of Prince Albert 



Prince Albert 



THE NATIONAL 
JOY SMOKE 



I 



PAGE FOUR 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, APRIL 15, 1937 




To the Editor df La Vie: 

This, our inilitantly Christian, and 
presumably academic retreat is ordinar- 
ily as calm as Tennyson, and some dare 
to intimate, at times as boring. Here 
we dwell free, for the most part, from 
the cares attendant upon faction and 
the enervating pangs of strife, with only 
an occasional minor altercation to mark 
the passage of time while we pursue 
the fairly even tenor of our slightly di- 
verse ways. Here each extends a friend- 
ly hand to all, and if some do so dis- 
gruntledly, there are at least none who 
dare to depart from the general rule. 
Here, in fine, it is pretty commonly con- 
ceded that God is in his heaven and, if 
all is not quite right with the world, 
there is at least some comfort in that 
the world is reasonably remote; what- 
ever storms of greed or evil may afflict 
it can not ripple the peaceful surface 
of the breakwater. 

This is the situation for all the year 
witli two minor exceptions — the Flag 
Scrap on the first Monday evening of 
each academic year, and the morning of 
the so-called "Tug-o'-War" which takes 
place in the early fall on an indefinite 
date. Upon these occasions it is appar- 
ently the duty of every self-respecting 
male student and all coeds properly en 
dowed with the spirit of Christian co- 
operation to abrogate by mob action the 
rules of common decency and the stan. 
dards of good sense to indulge the pent 
up primitive urges that lurk in man and 
hold a saturnalia of swinishness and stu- 
pidity. For some reason not quite clear 
books are supplanted by bloodshed, de- 
cency by destruction, and harmony by 
hate. This state of affairs, according to 
the logic of certain old-school die-hards, 
is the sum/mum bowwn of a college life 
which is not as good as it used to be; it 
is the only remaining trace of an erst 
while barbarism which is somehow sup 
posed to have refined the rogue, concili 
ate the cocky, and instill the germs of 
a nobility of soul that subsequent ex 
periences of a similar nature were sup 
posed to bring to full fruitition. Or so, 
at least, we are told. 

A scepticism concerning the validity 
of pronouncements by soi-disant sages 
being one of the benefits we have thus 
far derived from the more strictly cur 
ricular department of our college educa 
tion, however, we shall have the temer 
ity to suggest that there is some fallacy 
in the syllogisms of the old school. In 
short, it seems to us that throwing the 
Freshmen and Sophomores into a physi 
cal combat of which the accepted tactics 
are those of rapine and riot, and in 
which the side that can arrange, by- 
whatever devious means suggest them 
selves to their intelligences, to maim 
and disable the supporters of the oppo. 
site side is, at best, a curious way to 
promote the ideals of friendship, kind 
ness, and respect for order and sensi- 
bility which it is one of the explicit aims 
of the controlling powers to instill in 
the student body. 

On the other hand, it seems to us that 
the prevailing custom is an exceedingly 
good way to breed grudges, to encour 
age hate and lawlessness, and to encour 
age the bullying sadism, which, unfortu 
nately, seems to dwell not very far be- 
neath the surface in some members of 
this allegedly civilized community of stu- 
dents. At the same time, we fail to see 
how any worthwhile advantage may be 
secured by inviting underclassmen to 
bash in the heads of one another, to de 
stroy the property of the college and 
the students, and in general, to recom 
mend the exercise of stupid anger in 
behalf of objectives never very clear. 

For this reason, we hope that what- 
ever authority is charged with the man 
agement of such matters will see fit to 
abolish the Freshman-Sophomore Flag 
scrap and the annual "Tug-o'-War" held 
across the Quittapahilla. The former is 
a senseless harking back to barbarism 
and the latter an inane spectacle de 



DR. L K. ADE ADDRESSES 

STUDENTS IN CHAPEL 

(Continued from page 1) 



casionally to tell anecdotes and add im- 
promptu remarks. 

In moments of serious thought while 
lecturing upon the art of living together, 
the State Superintendent of Public In- 
struction declared that both individual- 
ism and social consciousness should be 
developed by the schools. He sarcastic- 
ally referred to the newspaper reporters 
who misquoted this statement in the past. 

Dr. Ade has a very pleasing person- 
ality ; his audience was attentive and 
appreciative. 



signed, at best, to afford amusement to 
the less intelligent members of the stu- 
dent body, and at worst, to cause the 
participants to risk without cause ex- 
posure to disease and injury, not to 
mention the certain destruction of cloth- 
ing. 

We do not make this request merely 
as a matter of personal convenience, 
since our class standing now precludes 
that motive; we make it rather as a plea 
for sanity, for the abolition of these en- 
tirely useless evils will correct one of 
the few overlooked solecisms remaining 
to be rectified in order to make Lebanon 
Valley, as nearly as possible, what it 
strives and ought to be. 

Very sincerely yours, 

Cerberws. 

* * # 

To the Editor of La Vie: 

On Wednesday, April 7, 1937, an event 
took place in a near-by community that 
will not be forgotten for some years to 
come. That event was a result of the 
age-old problem, capital vs. labor. For 
the last four years labor in this country 
has seen an opportunity to fight its bat- 
tle against its adversary. It startejd out 
at first very timidly, then gradually grew 
bolder and bolder with the aid of the 
national government. Then out of all 
this trouble emerged a man, who at pres- 
ent in the minds of the people of this 
community at least, is nothing more than 
a selfish racketeer, none other than John 
L. Lewis. The main issue in this connec- 
tion is the question, "What will be the 
final outcome of all this? Will Mr. Lew- 
is and his organization go the ways of 
other unions, and finally, do we know 
the opinion of the majority of the work- 
ing people concerning this man?" Evi- 
dently the people of this area were 
against the union as they showed last 
Wednesday. But they also displayed the 
animal like characteristic of mankind 
when they rushed into the great Ilershey 
Chocolate factory, and brought their fel- 
low men out bleeding and beaten half tu 
death. True enough these strikers dis- 
played their boldness,, when they held 
possession of the plant, and displayed 
many un-American tactics but did we, 
as Americans, and who profess to be 
good Christians, do right in evicting 
those men in such a manner? The whole 
affair was a fine example of mob psy- 
chology. 

Along with the mob went our so-called 
educated people. The ones who some day 
will supposedly hold responsible posi- 
tions, and positions of authority. The 
author was in that mob, and is not of- 
fering any apologies, but we so-called 
college students surely did not show any 
education in Ilershey last Wednesday. 
We joined the parade and shouted with 
the multitude, in fact when the farmers 
held their assembly in the ice arena, it 
was the college students who agitated 
and added color to the whole affair by 
giving our college yells in support to the 
mob. 

I think that if the college students 
would sit down and think this over, they 
might realize that the people may not 
think as highly of a college hereafter 
because of such tactics. And lastly the 
student should have enough respect for 
himself and his fellow citizens not to en- 
ter into such actions of this kind again. 
Very sincerely yours, 

Anon. 



archy 
and 
mehitabel 



Notes On Books 



with apologies to don marquis 



mehitabel i am going to college 
now it may seem funny for a cockroach 
to 

be going to college but you get use 
to it it is very cosy in the basement of 
the girls dormitory so i am going to 
go to college for a while 

until you get used to it here the people 
seem sort of crazy but they 
are not crazy they are only in love 
what is love mehitaibel you are sophis- 
ticated 
and ought to know 
the girls dean ought to know she 
has been around but i guess she does n t 
she said the other day anyhow look she 
said bristling with little exclamation 
points of righteous indignation look 
at that aungst boy he is standing 
on the front steps and she 
why she is standing a step above him 
and their noses are fairly touching 

they ought to know 

but they would n t tell me 

i guess a fellow they call brownie 

he plays a saxaphone or something 

ought to know he went 

to niillersburg the night they 

held the conserve dance he went 

there to get his girl who was 

supposed to get off the train 

at harrisburg and meet him 

she said she heard the conductor 

say something burg but gee 

you could n t understand a 

conductor so she guessed he 

must have said harrisburg 

anyhow he must not of because 

brownie had to go to millershurg 

i wanted to ask him since 

he ought to know what 

love is but he did n t 

have time 

a fellow from new jersey 

they are calling joe 

just now says maybe 

he knows it is maybe hell 

he did n t get invited 

to a house party with 

his girl but then too 

he is from east orange 

and that may have something 

to do with it 

and i therefore 

discount his theory 

till i hear from you 

anyhow mehitabel you 

can tell me 

what is love 

archy 

p s you must pardon 
my new school grammar 
because it is too hard 
for me to reach the 
shift key on a typewriter 
and a cockroach must be 
careful 



MAY DAY PREPARATIONS 

PROMISE COLORFUL SCENE 



(Continued from page 1) 



place — and an oriental solo dance by Lu- 
cille Maberry, a flame dance by the 
sophomore music women, a wooden sol- 
dier dance by the freshmen women, a 
fairy dance by the freshmen women, and 
then a combination of the two. The May 
pole dance on two May poles by the Ju- 
niors, and the grand finale — general danc- 
ing on the green with the recessional of 
the queen, the court and the May pole 
dancers. And May Day will be over, 
the barker will cease his crying and 
everyone will return home. 



Strategy in Handling People tells how 
your own every-day problems in dealing! 
with others have been solved by the 
world's ablest men. It shows how you 
can easily use their methods to increase 
your influence over the people around 
you. Fascinating as a detective story, 
it makes plain many surprising facts 
which have been long shrouded in need- 
less mystery. Through dramatic incidents 
from the lives of over two hundred suc- 
cessful men, it explains exactly how 
these men have gained personal power; 
how they have found, in their contents 
with other people, the true secret of 
success and how you can do the same 
This book has aroused whole-hearted en- 
thusiasm among such leaders as Thomas 
A. Edison, Walter P. Chrysler, George 
W. Hodges, John .1. ltaskob. The plan 
of it has been approved by over one hun- 
dred and fifty of the country's outstand- 
ing psychologists. How to make people 
like you — how to impress strangers — 
how to stablish your influence over su- 
periors and subordinates and friends — 
how to put across your ideas — how to 
inspire loyalty — how to size up people — 
how to handle difficult business situa- 
tions — these are some of the vital prob- 
lems discussed and made clear in this 

epoch-making book. 

* * * 

E. K. Broadus, Professor of English 
Language and Literature at the Univer- 
sity of Alberta, gives us The Story of 
English Literature, beginning with the 
days when the Celtic and Anglo-Saxon 
story-tellers sang of brave deeds as they 
drank their mead in the halls of their 
kings and warriors, and ending with our 
own times. He tells of English drama 
from the miracle plays onward; of the 
stories of Elizabethan adventures and 
their voyages; of Spenser's "Faerie 
Queen" and Sir Philip Sidney's sonnets, 
of Ben Jonson and his disciple — Her rick, 
and other early poets. Three of his most 
absorbing chapters are those on Bacon, 
on Milton, and on Bunyan's World and 
Dryden's. Then he takes up "Men of the 
World" — such as Pope, Addison, and 
Samuel Johnson; the romantic poets and 
early 19th century poets, from Gray and 
Cowper to Wordsworth, Shelley, and the 
rest; the novel, from Defoe to Hardy, 
Wells, and Galsworthy; the galaxy of 
essayists, critics, sages, down through 
Matthew Arnold and Huskin; and finally 
some recent poets — Tennyson, Brown- 
ing, Hardy, Kipling, Masefield. Many 
excerpts from various authors are given 
to illustrate the literature of each pe- 
riod. Other attractive features are a 
two-page map in color, and pictures both 
in color and in black-and-white. 



Do you postpone your hair- 
cuts? If so we urge you to 
give us a trial. 

• 

Modern Equipment Plus a 
Complete Stock of Reading 
Material. 

KarPs Shop 



Men's New Spring Neckwear 
Polo Shirts 
Men's, Women's and Children's 
White Oxfords 

JOHN HIRSH 

WAGNER and SHAUD, M gr> 



DI NUNZIO 
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9 E. Main St., ANNVILLE p A 



RENU SHOP 

One Day Service 
Dry Cleaning, Pressing, Rep a / r ; n? 
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D. L. SAYLOR & 
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Lumber and Coal 

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KREAMER BROS. 

Furniture 
Floor Coverings 
Electric Refrigerators 
Hoover Electric Sweepers 
Electric Washing Machines 

RCA Radios 
FUNERAL DIRECTORS 
Phone 144 ANNVILLE, PA. 



Meals Served Daily 

Best Sundaes in Town with 
Home Made Ice Cream 
Sandwiches, Cigarettes, Candy 

C. D. BRUNNER 

E. Main St. ANNVILLE, PA. 



For School Supplies and 
Books of all Kinds Go To: 

BOLLMAN'S 

628 Cumberland Street 
LEBANON, PA. 



Complete Your Food 
Supply For That Midnight 
Lunch By Stopping At 

FINK'S BAKERY 



We sell all types of baked product* 
at all hours. 




'Start the day 

In the Modern way. 



Breakfast at the Pennway 



THE PENNWAY HOTEl 



Vol 

BP 
Pul 



i 



Frolic with 
the Frosh! 



Wit (ftoiktji 




that's taking 
place May 14? 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



Vol 



XIV 



ANNVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA, THURSDAY, APRIL 22, 1937 



No. 2 



Spring Season Marked 
By Round Of Events 

BANQUETS IN SEASON 

publication Staffs to Close 
Activities in Approved 
Manner 

The calendar of the activities commit- 
tee attests to the fact that the spring 
^son will presently be in full swing. 

Banquets, dances, and other entertain- 
ments have been planned by the various 
campus organizations which are resolved 
to end the scholastic year properly. It 
appears that the majority of organiza- 
tions favor the banquet as a means of 
doing this. The W. S. G. A. board was 
among the first to hold this function. 

A prominent affair will take place 
when the present and retired La Vie 
staffs gather at the Green Terrace at 
their annual banquet on Wednesday ev- 
ening, April 28. These events in previous 
years have featured well-known person- 
alities in the field of journalism as 
speakers, and although the full particu- 
lars of the program are not. known as 
yet, it is expected that it will be as en- 
tertaining as those in the past. Richard 
Baus, the retired editor, is handling those 
details. 

The staff of the 1938 Qwttapahilla 
will also hold its banquet at the same 
place on Wednesday evening, May 5. The 
guests will not only include several fac- 
ulty members, but also the representa- 
tives of the companies which handled 
the technical work of the book. This 
hanquet has not been observed as a year- 
ly affair, but the general opinion is that 
the staff deserves one as a recognition 
of commendable work done on the book. 
It is hoped that Mr. E. II. Adler, of the 
Canton Engraving Co., may be secured 
as the speaker for the evening. 

The Men's Senate lias not yet decided 
"pon any activities at the close of the 
semester, but it is probable that their 
annual feast at Shartlesville may be re- 
peated. These banquets are an occasion 



for 



a congenial get-together between 



senators and faculty advisers, and are 
greatly enjoyed by both. 



Music Festival Proves 
Outstanding Success 

Ba «d and Glee Club Well Re- 
ceived; Band Active at 
Many Points 



Th 

^ e annual spring music festival which 

wkh PreSt - nted by tHe gleC ° lub a " d ban<1 
tne ir guest soloists was an out- 

l3 J cli "g success. 

' four o'clock in the afternoon, the 
glee club 
and 



was greeted »with a fair-sized 



Ver y appreciative audience. The 



pro- 

> which combined the solemn beauty 
v e ; n u ^usic with selections of lighter 
and' Pr ° ved attractive to the audience 

€speciaI1 y wel1 received. 
m 0re e eve 'ung an even larger and 
n om e emhusiastic audience welcomed the 
abl e COncert of the band. Many favor- 
nn, s i°° mmc,1 ts were heard regarding the 
the b a y an< ' spirited manner in which 

Tu en tertained their hearers, 
^om p talented young drummers 
c iat e( i ~ niWa 'l wef e especially appre- 
th e j r ' ln ese students should go far on 
(Co " instr ument. 

nt ^rmed on Page U, Column 5) 



Freshman Class 

Holds Dance 



The Freshman class will hold its 
Frosh Frolic on Friday night, April 
23, in the Annville High School, with 
dancing from 8:15 to 11:45. Music 
will be supplied by the augmented 
orchestra which plays for the recrea- 
tion hours. 

Jack Moller, class president and 
general chairman of the dance, has 
appointed the following committees: 
Tickets, Louise Savior, chairman, 
James Whitman, Lillian Leisey, and 
Kenneth Morrow; Decorations- and 
Arrangements, Ruth Ruppersberger, 
chairman, Jane Eby, and Robert 
Artz. The dance programs are the 
tickets of admission and can be ob- 
tained from any member of the com- 
mittees. The admission price for the 
dance is fifty-five cents, stag or drag. 

The chaperones who have been in- 
vited to the Frolic are Mrs. Mary C. 
Green, Professor and Mrs. M. L. 
Stokes, and Professor and Mrs. Clark 
Carmean. 



Green Blotter Club 
Admits New Members 



Bender, Tierney, and Evans 
Taken into Honor Literary 
Circle 



The evening of Thursday, April 15, the 
Green Blotter Club met at the home of 
Dr. and Mrs. Struble in Cleona to decide 
upon the manuscripts submitted for club 
membership. Five persons of the Junior 
class had turned in articles to the mem- 
bers of the club to fill one Junior vacancy 
then existing. Three papers had been 
submitted by Freshmen. 

The papen were numbered, read, dis- 
cussed, and voted upon according to ex- 
pression, originality, and promise of 
achievement. After one manuscript of the 
Juniors was accepted, the club learned 
that Betty Bender had been admitted to 
its midst. The same procedure was fol- 
lowed in the case of each of the Frosh 
manuscripts and Bettie Tierney and Eve- 
lyn Evans were added to the number of 
inkspots. 

The entire evening during which Clif- 
ford Barnhart, Keeper of the Word 
Horde, presided, was spent in discussing 
the literary efforts displayed in the ar- 
ticles read. 

Mrs. Struble, at the end of the discus- 
sion served lemonade and cookies still 
warm from the oven to the assembled 
group, after which each retired to his 
own dormitory or home. There remains 
one vacancy in the Sophomore class for 
an ambitious inkspot. 



Promenade To Pale 
Previous Prances 

PAUL TREMAINE'S BAND 

Hershey Park Ballroom Will 
Be Scene of Gala Spring 
Event 



This year, for the lirst time in the his- 
tory of the Junior Prom at Lebanon 
V alley, promenaders will dance to the 
music of a nationally known broadcast- 
ing orchestra. It will be Paid Tre- 
maine's twelve piece band of New York, 
well known to radio 1'steners throughout 
the country by virtue of his broadcasts 
over nation-wide hook-ups. He has furth- 
er widened his repute through seasonal 
appearances at the Hershey Ball Room, 
where he was billed last summer with 
such top -flight figures in the realm of 
syncopation as Rubinoff, Waring, Nel- 
son, Vallee, Bernie, Lombardo, et al. 

So it will not be Tremaine's first ap- 
pearance by any means at the Hershey 
Ball Room, where the prom is to be 
staged on May 14. Paul Ulrich, Junior 
Class president and master of cere- 
monies, stated that he anticipates a rec- 
ord-breaking crowd, composed of Tre- 
maine followers together with students, 
to gather at 8 o'cloc :<., when the affair 
is scheduled to stprt^. 

But the music of a nationally famous 
orchestra is not the only innovation 
planned. The Program Committee, head- 
ed by Lucille Maberry, is arranging for 
attractive novelty features to be inter- 
spersed among the other events of the 
evening. Although the exact nature of 
this entertainment must remain as a 
surprise, it was hinted that a group of 
professional tap and toe dancers from 
Reading will probably furnish several 
specialty numbers before and after the 
intermission. Besides these some junior 
class terpsichorean talent will be fea- 
tured. 

The Hershey Ball Room itself, in this 
one of the opening dances, the third of 
the summer season, boasts a beautiful 
new lighting system installed only last 
fall. The Hershey hall is in addition situ- 
ated in the midst of Central Pennsylva- 
nia's playground, Hershey Park, provid- 
ing a most congenial background of fun 
and gaiety. 

Ulrich, when interviewed, expressed 
satisfaction with the co-operation of his 
committees, which have done their work 
so well, he asserted, that tickets may he 
offered for sale this week. The Publi- 
city Committee, in charge of newspaper 
advertising, posters, and of all notices 
of the function, is made up of Betty 

(Continued on Page 3, Column 3) 



Will Retire as Dean 




MRS. MARY GREEN 

"/ shall miss everything." 



Other Campuses On Strike Today 



As this issue comes off the presses the 
students of hundreds of other colleges 
throughout the country are staging a 
concerted walk-out. They are calling 
a strange sort of general strike to pro- 
test against war in general, but particu- 
larly to show themselves as solidly op- 
posed to a dingus called the Hill-Shep- 
ard bill which Congress recently passed. 
This bill enables it, in case of war, 
to make the dictatorships existent in 
Fascistic governments abroad look like 
sissy stuff contrived by amateurs. 

The way this strike is being run is 



rather unusual too; it is being instigated 
by large inter-collegiate organizations 
such as the National Student Federation 
of America, the Metropolitan Intercolle- 
giate Union, the American Student 
Union, and the National Council of 
Methodist Youth, and organized on indi- 
vidual campuses by student government 
associations or those founded for the 
expression of student opinion. These 
bodies have secured the hacking of the 
individual students who -instead of 
parading the campus in rebellion against 
(Continued on Page 4, Column 4) 



Retiring Dean of Women and Asso- 
ciate Professor of French for whom a 
birthday and farewell party was held last 
Thursday evening. Mrs. Green will con- 
tinue to act in the latter capacity. 



Y Cabinets Installed 
in Chapel Program 

Straub and Faust Relinquish 
Offices to Thompson and 
Maberry 

On Thursday, April 15, in the Chapel 
service the 1937 models of the Y. M. 
C. A. and Y. W. C. A. cabinets were 
duly presented and properly installed, all 
in one fell swoop. Whether they will im- 
mediately relapse into the usual coma or 
lethargic state remains to be seen. Per- 
haps, as a happy surprise, the current 
editions contain no modern Rip Van 
Winkles. That too the future will reveal. 

Dr. Clyde A. Lynch, president of Leb- 
anon Valley College, presided over the 
induction exercises, pinchhitting for Dr. 
R. R. Butterwick who was unable to at- 

(Continued on Page 4, Column 1) 



Women Hold Party 
In Honor Of Dean 



GIVE BIRTHDAY WISHES 



Party Also Occasion for Fare- 
wells; Varied Program is 
. Musical 



W P. A. SPONSORS 
COLLEGE AUTHORS 



The W. P. A. is sponsoring a col- 
legiate playwriting contest, manuscripts 
for which may be submitted by any reg- 
ularly enrolled student in an American 
college. There is no restriction as to 
theme but the direct observation of con- 
temporary American life is preferred. 

A feature of the W. P. A. Federal 
Theatre Project's newly-formed National 
Collegiate Advisory Committee, the con- 
test is intended to stimulate interest in 
the American drama. Other plans call 
for the establishment of a central col- 
lege play bureau and student sponsorship 
of Federal Theatre productions. 

The winning playwright will receive 
the W. P. A. Federal Theatre rental 
rate of fifty dollars a week. At least one 
week of production is guaranteed ; and 
if attendance warrants, the run will be 
extended. 

Judges will be members of the Federal 
Theatre project and the National Col- 
legiate Advisory Committee. Original 
full-length scripts must be submitted to 
the Education section, W. P. A. Federal 
Theatre Project, 122 East Forty-Second 
Street, New York City, by September 1, 
1937. Further details may be obtained 
at the same address. 



A farewell birthday party was given 
by the girls of the college for Mrs. Mary 
C. Green, Dean of Women, on Thursday 
evening, April 15, at 9 o'clock. Miss 
Lietzau, Miss Moyer, and the dormitory 
girls were present to wish the Dean a 
happy birthday. Upon her appearance 
the girls greeted her with the tradition- 
al happy birthday song; and Ruth Buck, 
W. S. G. A. president, presented to her 
in behalf of the girls a copy of "An 
American Doctor's Odyssey" by Victor 
Heiser. The program representing the 
three halls consisted of a vocal selection 
by Gayle Mountz, a cello solo by Doro- 
thy Zeiters, and a piano number by Cor- 
delia Shaeffer. Mrs. Green cut the first 
piece of her huge birthday cake; the 
girls were seated at the tables in the 
adjoining dining hall, and enjoyed them- 
selves eating cake and ice cream. Songs 
of all type* w.ere sung aid th? party 
closed with everyone autographing the 
fly-leaf of the new book. 

Though the party was gay, there seem- 
ed to be prevailing a feeling of regret 
that such a charming and efficient dean 
should be soon giving up the supervision 
of her girls. Mrs. Green has been on 
the college campus for twenty years; she 
first came to Lebanon Valley to lecture 
to the French classes, then upon faculty 
action she was asked to teach one class 
of French. From that beginning she be-» 
came Professor of French, and then 
Dean of Women. Her duties have grown 
with her position; at first she was head 
over fifty girls whose activities were 
very limited, for there could be no 
smoking, card parties, nor dances. The 
four main social events during the year 
were the society anniversaries at which 
time was given a play followed by a 
reception. Now Mrs. Green has twelve 
hours of teaching in addition to her du- 
ties of Dean, which have a far greater 
range than formerly. Feeling that the 
responsibilities are too great and there 
is too much work involved, she has de- 
cided to make this her last year as Dean 
of Women, although she intends to re- 
tain her position of Professor of French. 
Said Mrs. Green, "It has been most 
pleasant. I shall miss everything." 



Clio Sponsors Movies 

The annual Clionian benefit movies 
will gleam from the silver screen of 
the Astor Theatre from April 20 
to 22. 

Kay Francis will take a "Stolen 
Holiday" on Tuesday, and there will 
be much ado about "John Meade's 
Woman" during her two-day engage- 
ment in Annville. The latter film 
stars Edward Arnold and Francine 
Larrimore. 

Society members will save a cent 
on their tickets, the tax exemption 
allowed by the Astor management. 
The proceeds from the benefit mov- 
ies will be used to make Clio Hall 
more comfortable. 



I 



PAGE TWO 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, APRIL 22, 1937 



lOSTAIM.ISHKI) 1925 



A weekly publication by the Undergraduate Students of Lebanon Valley College 



EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 

Charles Boyd Shaffer 



EDITORIAL BOARD 

ASSOCIATE EDITOR 

Mary Louise Stoner, '38 

FEATURE EDITOR SPORTS EDITOR 

William F. Clark, '39 Roger B. Saylor, '38 

REPORTORIAL STAFF 

Clarence Lehman, '39 
Robert Long, '39 
Sarah MacEwen, '39 
Alice Richie, '39 
Samuel Rutter, '39 
Barbara Bowman, '40 
Carl Ehrhart, '40 
Evelyn Evans, '40 
John Ness, '40 
Louise Saylor, '40 



Clifford Barnhart, '38 
Elizabeth Bender, '38 
Sylva Harclerode, '38 
Ernestine Jagnesak, '38 
Wanda Price, '38 
Calvin Spitler, '38 
Theresa Stefan, '38 
Howard Baier. '39 
Robert Clippinger, '39 
. nomas Guinivan, '39 



BUSINESS BOARD 
BUSINESS MANAGER CIRCULATION MANAGER 

Curvin N. Dellinger, '38 Ernest Weirick, '39 

ASSISTANT ASSISTANT 

Raymond Smith, '39 Warren Sechrist, '40 



Single Copies 5 cents 

Subscription $1.00 per year 



Entered at the Annville, Ta., post office as second class matter, under the Act of 
March 3, 1879. 

Published weekly through the school period, except during holiday vacation and 
examination week. 



REPRESENTED FOR NATIONAL ADVERTISING BIT 

National Advertising Service, Inc. 

Colli/* Fmblitktn Riprntnftiv t 
420 Madison Ave New York. N.Y. 
chicaoo - Boston - San Francisco 
Los ANULII • Portland - Seattle 



Vol. XIV 



THURSDAY, APRIL 22, 1937 



No. 2 



A PLEA FOR ORDER 



Since agitation seems to be one of the particular hobbies of a good many of 
the dormitory students on the campus, and since agitation usually calls forth the 
best brains of the local brain-trust, we suggest a little agitation along constructive 
lines. Reference is made to the condition of the Y. JM. C. A. reading-room in the 
Men's Dormitory. The general disorder and confusion in that room is appalling, 
co say the least, with the mixture of newspapers and magazines lying about every- 
where, (unless they have been appropriated for a bit of private study and con- 
templation.) 

We suggest that, in all sportsmanship and with respect for order, students 
replace these magazines and papers in the rack when they have finished reading 
them, or at least keep them off the floor where someone might want to walk. The 
Y. M. C. A. cabinet members have pledged to try to keep the room in better order 
but they need the full support of the students. In addition, they have been in- 
structed to turn into the Men's Senate the name of anyone whom they have seen 
littering up the floor. They say this is not intended to be a threat, but is given as 
a bit of kindly advice, for there is a law and that law not only lias bark, but also 
bite. 



THE OLD ORDER CHANGETH 



One of the recent tendencies in college journalism deplored by speakers at the 
recent convention of the Intercollegiate Newspaper Association was that of college 
papers attempting to imitate the makeup and writing of metropolitan dailies. It 
was their belief that the prominent newspapers were forced to retain their conser- 
vative, time-approved policies lest they reduce their circulation by making innova- 
tions that did not meet with public favor. It therefore remains for the college 
papers, with no great consequences at stake, to conduct whatever practical experi- 
ments may be made in the field of journalism today. 

It is the opinion of the editors of La Vik that the large daily papers do not 
operate under the same circumstances nor conditions that obtain on the campus of 
Lebanon Valley College. Nor do the same problems face the staff of this paper, 
as face the editors of the papers of larger colleges and universities. For this rea 
son we believe that La Vie must work out its problems in its own distinctive way. 

In view of these facts, the staff is prepared to devote the few remaining issues 
of this semester to experimentation in news writing, features, and makeup. If we 
can make the paper interesting in its entirety to the whole student body, we shall 
feel that our purpose has been accomplished. All constructive criticisms and help- 
ful suggestions will be greatly appreciated by the staff. 



Died 



Matthais P. Moller, 82, owner of the 
M. P. Moller organ works of Hagers- 
town, at his home in that city, April 13, 
of complications following an attack of 
pneumonia last fall. 

Organs manufactured by the Moller 
company arc used extensively in many of 
the leading churches throughout the 
country; and the organ recently installed 
in the Engle Conservatory is of this 
make. 



Y. W. C. Activity 

The retiring Y. W. C. A. Cabinet, the 
newly-elected Cabinet and the Freshman 
Cabinet were present at a buffet supper 
given by Mrs. P. A. W. Wallace at her 
home Monday evening, April 19. Mrs. 
Clyde A. Lynch, Mrs. Mary C. Green, 
Miss Mary E. Gillespie, Mrs. A. H. M. 
Stonecipher and Miss Helen E. Myers 
were among those present. Following 
this delicious supper everyone joined in 
playing games which terminated a very 
pleasant evening. 



The Week In Review 



,emur Loses 



Eiit 



Last week the Biology Department 
added the skin of a Philippine flying 
lemur to the museum. The specimen was 
presented by Dr. Francis H. Rose, pro- 
fessor of Biology, Central Philippine 
College. It came into Dr. Derickson's 
possession via Prof. Struble, a close 
friend of Dr. Rose. The fur is soft and 
silky in texture with tissue-paper thick- 
ness. On a recent visit to our campus 
Dr. Rose agreed to send tropical speci- 
mens to Dr. Derickson in exchange for 
specimens of this locality. The new ad- 
dition to the museum is the first speci- 
men to reach the campus. 



L W . Roams 



The Life Work Recruits spent their 
week-end on a Southern tour entailing 
more than three hundred miles of travel, 
which is considerably more mileage than 
deputations they have covered hitherto. 

They conducted a Sunday School ser- 
vice at 9:30 a. m. a few miles east of 
Martinsburg, Virginia, in the Blairton 
church where Daniel Shearer spoke on 
"Temperance." After the service the Re- 
cruits went to the First Church in Mar- 
tinsburg where Elwood Needy gave a 
sermon about "Looking Ahead." After 
dinner, they went to Winchester, Vir- 
ginia to visit Sarah Lupton, a former 
member of the organization. 

In the meantime, Daniel Shearer, El- 
wood Needy, and Ethel Wilt held a 
Christian Endeavor service at the Pike- 
side United Brethren Church south of 
Martinsburg, with Shearer in charge of 
the proceedings which consisted in the 
teaching of a Sunday School lesson by 
Ethel Wilt and a resume on life at Leb- 
anon Valley College by Elwood Needy. 

Ethel Wilt led the service at the last 
meeting of the day which was held in 
the First Church at Martinsburg. After 
the opening ritual, Vernon Rogers read 
a Scriptural selection that was appro- 
priate to the sermon of the evening, 
which Daniel Shearer delivered. After 
the sermon Elwood Needy gave a 
prayer. 

A string trio, John Zettlemoyer, Dor- 
othy Zeiters, and Dorothy Yeakel, and 
Rose Tschopp, vocalist, provided music 
for all services. 

Another deputation went to the 
Church of God in Middletown, l'a., 
where they held Sunday School services 
during which Louis Straub discussed the 
''Scientific Basis for Temperance." Ethel 
Houtz was in charge of the morning 
church services in which Paul Meyers 
talked on the subject, "Rightly Dividing 
the Truth." Jean Marberger sang sev- 
eral numbers, and Kathryn Yingst 
played a violin solo. 



Agitation in Pajamas 

This little hamlet was ablaze with col- 
or on the evening of April 13 when the 
boys decided to display their night wear 
to the wondering public. It all started 
when Louis Straub pulled his marine 
suit out of the moth balls causing a mili- 
tary spirit to prevail throughout the even- 
ing's entertainment. And what entertain- 
ment it was with those boop-a-doop horn 
players tooting semi-religious encores. 

History was made on this exciting tour 
and points of interest along the route of 
the parade included North Hall, South 
Hall, and West Hall parlors, the library, 
and Louie's. The manner in which Ted 
Loose held the unruly mob in suspense 
at the I. R. C. meeting can never be for- 
gotten. As the parade proceeded up main 
street people thronged the sidewalks 
thinking a strike was in progress, traffic 
was blocked, the town cop was honored, 
and all came to the conclusion that this 
must surely have been a delegation which 
had escaped from the Wernersville Nut- 
house. 



The Women, Bless Them 

Thomas Guinivan was in charge of the 
Life W ork Recruit meeting held last 
Thursday evening in the North Hall 
Parlor at 6:4.5 P. M. Dr. Richie led the 
discussion on qualifications of a life 
partner. 11c said that we often pick 
our life's partner because of good looks. 
So often when we do this, we pick a 
lemon in the garden of love, where we 
thought only peaches grow. 

The men and women each named qual- 
ifications for the opposite sex who might 
some day be their partner. Following 
are the attributes desired for a woman: 
discrimination, sociability, contentment, 
ability, diplomacy, neatness, sympathy, 
health, and education. The qualifications 
for a man consisted of: personality, sin- 
cerity, devotion, courtesy, tact, and sym- 
pathy. Each one picked six chief quali- 
ties and the first six will be announced 
next week at the meeting. 



Old Gradi 



Announcement was recently made of 
the engagement of Miss Sarah Smith to 
Edwin G. Sheffy '25. Both Miss Smith 
and Mr. Sheffy are instructors at the 
Towanda High School. 

Miss Lucille Kann '27, daughter of 
Dr. and Mrs. Charles Kann, of Harris- 
burg, was married to Edwin R. Keim on 
April 17 in the First Church of God. 
Mr. and Mrs. Keim will go as mission- 
aries to the mountains of West Virginia, 
near Marion. 

Ihe Rev. J. Maurice Leister '15, pas- 
tor of Vira, Burham, and Milroy Pres- 
byterian churches, was elected modera- 
tor of the Presbytery of Huntingdon 
at the session held in Clearfield Presby- 
terian Church this week. Rev. Leister 
was also named one of the commission- 
ers of the Presbytery to the General As- 
sembly of the Presbyterian Church in 
the United States, which will meet in 
May in Columbus, Ohio. 

Under the sponsorship of the Hershey 
Education Association the members of 
the faculty of the Hershey Junior-Senior 
High School will present Oscar Wilde's 
"The Importance of Being Earnest." 
Miss Lucille Shenk '23, a member of the 
faculty, is directing the play which will 
e pre ;ented this week. 

The Rev. Dr. John H. Ness '15, su- 
perintendent of the Pennsylvania Con- 
ference of the Church of the United 
Brethren in Christ, delivered a morn- 
ing address in the Annville Church. 



Dr. Lynch Active 

Dr. Clyde A. Lynch, president of 
college, will preach two sermons, att 
a conference, and deliver an addt-f>c„ 
week. SSne * 

After speaking on Sunday at the ty 

Hill United Brethren Church and 7 

Linglestown U. B. Church, in thp e 
, . , 1T) orn. 

nig and evening respectively, Dr. L 

will spend Monday and Tuesday at t , 

annual meeting of the Pennsyl Van j e 

Council of Churches to be held i n ^ 

Grace Methodist Church, Harrisburg 6 

"Problems of Youth" will be the sub 

ject of an address by the president 

York on Wednesday. He will speak ' 

the Yorktown Hotel, where Philoko s 

mian Literary Society will hold its An 

niversary this year. 



Philos Emote 



On April 30 Philo will present its An- 
niversary play Three Cornered Moon 
Casting has been completed as follows- 
Mrs. Rimplegar— Martha Faust; Eliz a . 
beth Rimplegar — Grace Naugle; Kemu'tk 
Rimplegar— Robert Tqhopp ; Doughs 
Rimplegar — Benny Goodman ; Ed Rim- 
plegar — Daniel Sieverling ; Donald, an 
impoverished novelist — William Earnest • 
Dr. Stevens — Kenneth Eastland; Kitty— 
Louise Saylor; Jenny, the maid—Jew 
Harnish. The play is being directed by 
Harold Phillips. 

Three Cornered Moon, by Gertrude 
Tonkonogy, is the story of the Rimple- 
gars, a delightfully insane family from 
Brooklyn, and the way in which they 
weather the Stock-Market crash. The 
plot centers about Elizabeth, her infatua- 
tion for Donald, and Dr. Stevens, the 
one completely normal person in the 
Rimplegar house. 

The play promises to be unique in 
several respects : The staging, by 
Schmidt and Phillips, is of a type new 
to L. V. C, and it has been promised 
positively that there will be no picture of 
Aunt Hepzibah on the wall when the 
curtain goes up. Furthermore, Three 
Cornered Moon will go down in local 
history as "The Play Without a Fire- 
place," one of the first of its kind. 

Kenneth Eastland, Anniversary Presi- 
dent, has said : "Because we believe that 
the campus wants comedy, especially 01 
this type, we are breaking a four-year 
tradition in presenting a play without 
melodrama. The society extends sincere 
thanks to Hal Phillips for his assistance." 




" Well, what's the good news?" 

"Long Distance rates are re- 
duced ALL DAY SUNDAY 
and after seven every night. " 

• Is it somebody's birthday, wedding 
or anniversary? Extend your best 
wishes personally— by telephone. 

THE BELL TELEPHONE COMPANY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



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LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, APRIL 22, 1937 



PAGE THREE 



Sporti 



Features 



Yts Shots 



> pj ie 1937 Eastern Pennsylvania Col- 
League started rolling last Sat- 



leg* te 



llT 



day 



when Gettysburg and Albright 
led ; anc ^ IU a anc ^ woolly game 
j^Lgbtirg overcame the Red and White 
the tune of n-9- Neither team played 
% enough to put any real scare into 
6 other league members, although 



[he 
,nip r0 



vement can be expected from both. 



t wee k, while Gettysburg was sunk by 
ie Middies of Navy in a close game 

, It looks as if Lebanon Valley's fu- 
jre opponents are not so stron g a s they 
tight be- 

With the opening of the base- 
ba ll seasons for both L. V. C. 
an d the major leagues, diamond 
gossip and predictions are flying 
f aS t among the male students. 
The general opinion is that our 
team is not up to last year's 



par 



The Philadelphia Athletics 



seem to be the adopted team of 
the dormitory. Most of the boys 
had big smiles on their faces 
Monday evening after the Athle- 
tics had dropped Washington in 
a tight game 4-3. Ray Smith's 
face was almost a mile long in a 
longitudinal direction. Guess 
which team he was backing. 



Interest in tennis is ripe again now 
that the courts have made their belated 
opening. On Monday, their baptismal 
day, they were in almost constant use 
until darkness made the balls invisible. 
Most of the varsity candidates played 
several sets during the afternoon. Among 
the most agile performers on the court 
was Dr. Stevenson, coach of the tennis 
team; and we assure you that he can 
still show the boys how to do it. Sore 
muscles were the order when the alarm 
clocks let out their unwelcome blasts 
on Tuesday morning. 

The city of Lebanon will al- 
most monopolize the tennis team 
again this season. For some my- 
sterious reason the day students 
from that fair city seem to be 
able to subdue all others once 
they step on a court with rac- 
quet in hand. In fact, there is 
only one serious contender for a 
varsity berth from the dormi- 
tory unless Danny Seiverling de- 
cides to change his activities 
from the baseball diamond to the 
te nnis court. As for feminine 
racquet wielders, the situation is 
IWe different with Ernestine 
Jagnesak, Louise Saylor, and 
Carolyn Roberts playing fine 
games. 



Th 

y ^ e P°°l tournament sponsored by the 

t! " C. A. has occasioned considerable 
'"tej-pci 

«i among male students again this 

tn !i. ^ s tms was written the successor 
Vic V ' i ■ 

"ot h din £ er as P°°l champion had 
■ en decided. However, the feeling 



_ at the man who beats Don Colgan, 
err ystown cue artist, will be the 
fool j, Wln ' ^olgan ' s one °f the finest 
;„ . °oters that has been seen at this 



to 



The exhibition 



IJJ^for some time. 
la st J 6 m 0Ver whelming "Jocky" Zerbe 
W . Was truly remarkable. Almost 
tle aned tlme h e had an open rack he 
\ table before relinquishing the 

K- • ^ nr °yer has also shown 
5% ' litv in working his way to the 
% tT Wan "en Moyer, another good 

^'-fii S ? mingly had him beaten in their 
io wiii lla,s match, but Shroyer rallied 



hav e °^ Brown's friends 

of _ eer » accusing the sports ed. 



s<i erra ting B 



batt 



it 

of 



rown's high 
mg average. They 
was actually .110 in- 
alleged .210 as 



th 



Ace Moundsman 




PAUL BILLET 



The hopes of the 1937 edition of the 
Lebanon Valley baseball team rest 
squarely upon the shoulders of this star 
pitcher. For the past two seasons he has 
been one of the outstanding hurlers in 
eastern collegiate circles. This season 
he is expected to attain even greater at- 
tention from the major league teams- 



E-town Downed 



Lebanon Valley's 1937 racqueteers 
opened the season in a sensational style 
Tuesday afternoon by downing the Eliza- 
bethtown team 6-1 on the college courts. 
The only match which the visitors could 
salvage was the first doubles match. In 
this match Donmoyer and Shenk started 
fast but slumped badly in the last two 
sets to go down to defeat. Competition 
was rather keen, as a whole, as shown by 
the fact that only three of the matches 
were decided in two sets. The Elizabeth- 
town team was playing under a handicap 
because Newman, their ace, failed to ac- 
company them. . 

Summaries : 

Singles 

Donmoyer, L. V. C. defeated Schlosser, 

E-town, 6-1 ; 6-4. 
Shapiro, L. V. C. defeated Garber, E- 

town, 2-6 ; 6-3 ; 6-1. 
Shenk, L. V. C. defeated Baugher, E- 

town, 6-2 ; 6-8 ; 6-3. 
Umberger, L. V. C. defeated Martin, E- 

town, 4-6; 6-2; 6-:. 
Snell, L. V. C. defeated Litton, E-town, 

6-2 ; 6-3. 

Doubles 

Schlosser and Baugher, E-town defeated 
Shenk and Donmoyer, L. V. C. 2-6; 
6-0; 7-5- 

Shapiro and Umberger, L. V. C. defeated 
Garber and Litton, E-town, 6-3; 6-4. 



w 



omen s I ennis 



The girl's tennis tournament, uncom- 
pleted last fall because of cold weather, 
will he resumed next week, when Jean 
Houck and Louise Saylor will play in 
the semi-finals. The winner will play 
Ernestine Jagnesak in the finals. 

Carolyn Roberts,' tennis leader, has 
arranged a match with Albright College 
to be played subsequent to the organiza- 
tion of a Lebanon Valley girls' tennis 
team. 

The girls of the campus arc going to 
play bisclvill, provided that May Day 
practices do not prove to be too formid- 
able obstacles to efficient organization. 
Agnes Morris, the baseball leader, has 
Fir ranged for several games. 



printed. While the exact figures 
are not available, it is doubtful 
if slugger Brown would dare vis- 
it the practice diamond these 
days if his batting average were 
not at least .200. 



Postponement 



Due to a last minute postponement the 
baseball game scheduled to be played 
against the Palmyra A. A. was not played 
last Friday. Instead it will be played to- 
day thus making it the second game of 
the season, yesterday's game with Al- 
bright having been the opener. 

The team opened the season in fairly 
good shape. Numerous faults were over- 
come by the various players in the last 
week of practice. The battles for the sev- 
eral positions were decided, for the time 
being at least. Hitting still seems to be 
the main source of worry for Coach 
Metoxen, good hitters being rather 
scarce. Some of those men who can hit 
are the type of fielders that are just as 
likely to catch fly balls on the tops of 
their heads as in their gloves. 

One decidedly sour note w.as struck 
last week when George Katchmer, prom- 
ising freshman pitcher, injured his throw- 
ing arm- In fact, the damage done is so 
great that he is not expected to do any 
more pitching this spring. His loss may 
be keenly felt since he had a very baf- 
fling delivery in spite of his tendency 
toward wildness. This means that Paul 
Billet and Marshall Frey will have to 
bear the brunt of the mound duties for 
Blue and White. 



PROMENADE TO PALE 

PREVIOUS PRANCES 



(Continued from page 1) 



Bender, Ernestine Jagnesak, Lucille Ma- 
berry, Adolph Capka, David Byerly, and 
John Marberger. 

Always important is the Program 
Committee, responsible for arranging the 
evening's activities and for .selecting the 
Promenade Director, who this year will 



Steady Infielder 




Student's Recital 



ADOLPH CAPKA 

One of the steadiest and most talented 
members of the baseball team is this star 
infielder. With one excellent season of 
collegiate competition behind him, he is 
expected to attain even greater heights 
this spring. His cool-headedness should 
pull the infield through all the tight spots. 



be Prof. Carmean, the committee an- 
nounces. The printing of programs and 
their distribution is another task of this 
group, consisting of Lucille Maberry, 
Emily Kindt, Calvin Spitler, Roger Say- 
lor, and Christine Yoder. 

Besides these, the Arrangements Com- 
mittee has largely completed its prelimi- 
nary duties, which include the engage- 
ment of orchestra and place, being at 
present concerned with the printing of 
tickets. This committee comprises John 
Groff, Adolph Capka, Carolyn Roberts, 
Sylva Harclerode, and Lena Risser. 



One of the most successful recitals of 
the year was presented on Monday even- 
ing, April 19 at eight o'clock. 

The recital was opened by Robert 
Smith who played one of the most fami- 
liar and best-loved Beethoven Sonatas. 
It was the Sonata, Op. 14, No. 2 in G 
Major. 

Nora Franklin then sang "Awake Be- 
loved" by Edwards, "All Joy Be Thine" 
by Sanderson, "L'amour est un oiseau 
nebelle" (from "Carmen") by Bizet. 

Ethel Keller, an extension student on 
the piano, played the second Beethoven 
Sonata of the evening. This was "So- 
nata, Op. 31, No. 3" (first movement). 

Oleta Dietrich played two violin solos 
— "Necken" (Swedish Folk Song) and 
"Spanish Dance" by Aviles-Stoessel. 

"Album Leaf" by Scriabin and "The 
Minstrels" by Debussey were presented 
by Edna Binkley, pianist. 

Rose Tschop then sang "Life" by Cur- 
ran, "Sanctuary" by La Forge and 
"Spring Comes Dancing" by Phillips. 



MUSIC FESTIVAL PROVES 

OUTSTANDING SUCCESS 



(Continued from page 1) 



The conservatory considers this year's 
festival one of the most successful given 
thus far. 

The L. V. C. band has been quite ac- 
tive recently, aside from its participation 
in the spring festival. Tuesday evening 
the boys played in the Ephrata High 
School auditorium before a fair sized au- 
dience. A concert had been scheduled for 
this afternoon at the Waynesboro High 
School. Tonight they will appear in a 
concert at the first United Brethren 
Church of Waynesboro. 




PAGE FOUR 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, APRIL 22, 1937 



archy 
and 
mehitabel 



with apologies to don marquis 

well mehitabel i know what love is 

now it is what caused dinty nagle 

and his g f nellie m to be caught in 

what you might describe as a somewhat 

informal connection 

several days ago by the guardian 

of female morals said guardian 

spoke eloquently and to the point 

so at last i know what is love 

as she the guardian said 

it is positively indecent 

this time though mehitabel i am 

strangely enough more interested really 

in prospective lady missionaries 

who have devoted their lives to 

the good the true and the beautiful 

whatever that is 

one of these lady missionaries a 
miss audrie fox was recently followed 
yes mehitabel actually 
followed by a strange man 
whom naturally she shook off 
which she did by 

the brilliant subterfuge of going 
into a drug store and buying a bottle 
of jergen s hand lotion 
she is quoted as saying i walked 
faster and he walked faster and then 
i walked slower and he walked 
slower so i just went in the drug 
store and purchased a bottle of 
lotion which i need anyway 

another missionary lady miss edith 
metzger who seems to see in the boy 
preacher mr meyers just now her idea 
of the good the true and beautiful 
whatever and so forth 
reliable witnesses say likes to curl 
up in her spare moments with a good 
book as she says written by somebody 
like grace livingston hill 
lutz 

lutz that s whom she likes to 
curl up with 

therefore 

i am sure she wouldnt be interested 
in knowing who the parties were or 
party who had the temerity the 
audacity why the very 
idea 

to place in a 

locker in the men day students room 
a package of fire crackers which 
they had carelessly 
lit 

when everybody ran to see 

including dr lynch who said 

with others present why the temerity 

of it the audacity and the very 

idea 

when everybody had said this 
another bunch went off outside the 
window 

now tell me mehitabel were 
unknown causes really 
guilty 

also mehitabel i am told mr johnnie 
gongloff is a hero 
something busted the other night 
on the water distiller in the chem 
lab and it was proceeding 
to burn up the place he said 
literally burn it up 
so John stepped boldly forward and 
turning off the gas prevented it from 
burning the place up literally 
burning it up nuts say i 
archy 



Y CABINETS INSTALLED 

IN CHAPEL PROGRAM 



(Continued from page 1) 



tend. Short speeches were made by the 
retirinp- presidents of both organizations, 
Martha Faust and Louis Sttaub, in which 
each thanked his cabinet for its fine co- 
operation and support in the past year 



THE BOOKWORM TURNS 



Editor's Note : Beginning with this is- 
sue La Vie will retain a book critic who 
will criticize books recently made avail- 
able through the college library. Wlnle 
zue do not necessarily endorse his opin- 
ions, we feel reasonably certain that he 
knows ivhat he is talking about even if 
we are not always certain that he reads 
the books. 

Cicero, A Study by C. G. Richards 
(Houghton, Mifflin & Co.) 

Mr. Richards has written a book pri- 
marily of interest to scholars rather than 
the general public who will, for the most 
part, find his erudite and well-document- 
ed commentary — I shall not say biogra- 
phy — rather tough going. 

That this book adds one more to al- 
ready Babel-like stack of would-be Ci- 
ceronean biographies which fall by the 
pedantic way-side, thus furthering clut- 
tering that already pretty well barricad- 
ed pikeway is a circumstance to be re- 
gretted, because the Jeremiah of the Jul- 
ians would make capital material for 
some writer with a feeling for the drama- 
tic, if not so much interest in exactly 
what Mark Antony was doing at three 
p. m., July 12, 46 B. C. Myself, I have 
always wondered about Cicero's collec- 
tion of tables, his love-life, his heroic, 
though futile opposition to the Caesars 
that ultimately caused his death, the 
problem of whether his heroism arose 
from his vanity or his vanity from his 
heroism. After reading Mr. Richard's 

book, unfortunately, I am still wondering. 

* * * 

The Writings and Life of George Mere- 
dith, A Centenary Study by Mary Sturge 
Gretton 

(Harvard University Press) 

If the other biographies recently ac- 
quired by the college library are not of 
the best, this strange hybrid of criti- 
cism and history is infinitely worse. Per- 
haps Meredith enthusiasts will be able 
to discover some merit in it, but for my 
part — that of the impartial critic — I shall 
not hesitate to call it the merest drool. 

In fact, its only possible interest or 
usefulness lies in that it might be used 
for a rapid boning-up on Meredith in 
time for an exam, though why one 
should wish to bone-up Meredith at any- 
time or under any circumstance, I blush 

to confess, is a little beyond me. 

* * • 

The Street of the Fishing Cat by Jolan 
Foldes 

(Farrar and Rhinehart) 
This fine novel is not, as far as I know, 
in the local library, and the name of the 
author — who is a she, by the way — is pro- 
nounced Yo-LAN FERL — does as the 
limitations of the printing establishment 
where this paper is made, make it neces- 
sary to explain. However, I couldn't re- 
sist saying something about a book which 
more nearly approaches art than any- 
thing I've read in months. Besides, I wish 
to give vent to a great, typographical sigh 
of relief to have discovered at last one 
which doesn't peddle sociology. Or does 
it? You tell them. 



and hoped that the new cabinets would 
back their leaders in the same manner. 
Ex-President Straub's husky voice was 
due less to emotion than to his agitation 
two days before. In this very interesting 
round of bouquet throwing Miss Faust 
seemed to have the edge, her masterpiece 
being the "thorns among the roses" 
theme. 

After Lucille Maberry and Curvin 
Thompson had been installed as presi- 
dents of the Y. W. C. A. and Y. M. C. A. 
respectively, followed by the induction of 
the combined men's and women's cabi- 
nets, and after Dr. Lynch had offered the 
prayer of consecration, Thompson de- 
livered himself of a touching message, 
entirely extemperaneous, and promised 
great things for the Christian organiza- 
tions this year if he is only supported by 
the student body. 

The program was brought to a close 
by Philip Lester's playing "Still as the 
Night" as a trombone solo. 



FROM CAMPUS PENS 



Midnight 

The wind wails, 
The fire falls, 
A baby cries, 
A bird calls ; 

Man forgets 
Life's numbers, 
Maid regrets 
Love slumbers ; 

All sinks in sleep. 

* # # 

Lethe 

I have forgotten you, 

But as the early morning dew 

Lies heavily on the flowers, 

I can hear your laughing song, 

And as the sun slowly tints the sky, 

The echo of you does not die, 

And yet I have forgotten you. 

I have forgotten you, 
But as the warm noon sun 
Sprinkles the grass with dew, 
I see your sweet smile as of old, 
In each beam I see your face 
And yet I have forgotten you. 

I have forgotten you, 

But when the stars severely shine 

In their vast sheet of midnight blue, 

I feel your lips close to mine, 

The very heavens speak your name, 

And yet I have forgotten you. 

* # * 
Easter 

I smiled at him that Easter morn 
He asked me why I smiled so sweetly. 
When I denied he would have sworn 
I smiled at him that Easter morn 
I knew he liked the hat I'd worn 
He paused, he looked, and then discreetly 
I smiled at him. That Easter morn 
He asked me why I smiled so sweetly. 

* * * 

Gratitude 

I'm grateful, Lord, for everything, 
The fresh, clear air, the coming spring, 
The song of birds at early morn, 
The glow with which the day is born. 

The plants, the grass, the lovely flowers, 
Nourished by the cooling showers, 
The landscapes rare, by Nature made, 
The gnarled old trees that give us shade. 

The loving ways You have, dear Lord", 
Of cheering us when times are hard: 
A message fallen in our way, 
A friend's kind word, a child's laugh gay. 

Lord, kind Father of the poor, 

In You they have a haven sure. 

You never let life grow too sad, 

For strength from You will make us glad. 

I thank You, too, for life alone, 
That I've been chosen 'mong Your own, 
And that I'm sound. Sometimes I see, 
Lord, where You've been too good to me ! 



Colgan Crowned 

Pool Champ 

Coming through in characteristic 
Greenleaf style with an easy victory 
over his opponent, the champion of 
this year's pool tournament proves to 
be none other than Donald Colgan, a 
freshman. lie defeated Roger Saylor 
in the semi-finals and came through 
to defeat Wilbur Shroyer in the fi- 
nals. Shroyer was almost stopped in 
the semi-finals by Moyer only to meet 
his Waterloo in the finals. Colgan 
said, "It was easy," which serves as 
a challenge to L. V. C. pool sharks. 

Going back over the champion's 
and the runner-up's records, we find 
thai Colgan defeated Leech, Zerbe, 
and Saylor, while Shroyer defeated 
Bulota, I'oloniak, and Mover. A close 
contest was rumored for the finals, 
but perhaps the crowd was too much 
for the veteran for he was royally 
set back by the score of 125-50. 



OTHER CAMPUSES 

ON STRIKE TODAY 



(Continued from page 1) 



the administration — are doing their pro- 
testing with the official sanction of ad- 
ministration big-wigs who have been pe- 
titioned to declare a general holiday. 

In some college papers there is a hint 
that their students plan to make this 
strike-holiday an annual affair; at oth- 
ers nothing is being said as yet on this 
score. However, nearly all schools ap- 
pear at least to he in favor of the thing, 
both faculty and students, although dif- 
ficulty is being anticipated at some 
schools in securing a dismissal of classes 
on such short notice as is generally be- 
ing given. 

Beyond the idea of a general sort of 
protest, it must be admitted, the "strike" 
is not based on any very definite objec- 
tives. Isadore Goldman, a student at 
the Brooklyn Polytechnic Institute, has 
been quoted in the student organ at his 
school as saying "that a one-hour cessa- 
tion of class-room activity" would be a 
great "investment in the obstruction of 
future war." And an editorial in The 
Brown and White, from Lehigh U., 
speaks of "building a united front 
against war" and "solidifying for peace." 
The Haverford sheet, the News, merely 
carries an article expressing views hos- 
tile to the Hill-Shepard Bill. Other col- 
leges express views largely similar to 
these. 

It also seems that the World Peace- 
ways, the Y. W. C. A. and the Y. M. C. 
A., and the Emergency Peace Campaign 
Group are also agitating in favor of 
the annual day of anti-war protest idea, 
although the part these organizations 
play is a trifle vague, at least in the 
light of information which has thus far 
been made available. Anyhow, insofar 
as Lebanon Valley is concerned, such 
seems to be the case. Most students here 
appear to be wholly ignorant of what is 
ailing on, and according to certain 
weather-cocks of campus opinion, the 
rest do not seem to care much about it. 
Of course, some prefer to think that the 
lack of attention the matter has received 
locally is mainly due "to the lack of pub- 
licity that has been given it, while oth- 
ers, who confuse it with an affair similar 
to the extra football holiday strike held 
here several years ago are of the opin- 
ion that the rather shabby results of 
that fiasco would cause any such move- 
ment at this college to be predestined 
to an unsuccessful outcome. 



We are proud of our line of quality 
merchandise which includes a com- 
plete stock of 

YARDLEY ITEMS 

and 

Parker Fountain Pens and Pencils 

Diehl Drug Store 

103 W. Main St., Annville. Pa. 



Men's New Spring Necky^ 
Polo Shirts 
Men's, Women's and Child r 

White Oxfords **' 

JOHN HIRSH 

WAGNER and SHAUD, ^ 



Compliments of 

A. & P. STORE 

C. H. SHEARER, M gr . 



D. L. SAYLOR & 
SONS 

Contractors 

Lumber and Coal 

ANNVILLE, PENNA. 



KREAMER BROS. 

Furniture 
Floor Coverings 
Electric Refrigerators 
Hoover Electric Sweepers 
Electric Washing Machines 

RCA Radios 
FUNERAL DIRECTORS 
Phone 144 ANNVILLE, PA. 



Meals Served Daily 

Best Sundaes in Town with 
Home Made Ice Cream 
Sandwiches, Cigarettes, Cindy 

C. D. BRUNNER 

E. Main St. ANNVILLE, PA. 



For School Supplies and 
Books of all Kinds Go To: 

BOLLMAN'S 

628 Cumberland Street 
LEBANON. PA. 



Complete Your Food 
Supply For That Midnight 
Lunch By Stopping At 

FINK'S BAKERY 



We sell all types of baked product* 
at all hours. 



CLOTHINGOF QUALITY 

J. S. BASHORE 

Lebanon , 





'Start the day 

In the Modern way. 

Breakfast at the Penn** 



THE PENNWAY 



HOTEl 



r 

if 9 * 



Feature and 
Banquet Issue 



la$te€o%ienne 



j 

j • The beginning 
of the end 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 




ANNVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA, THURSDAY, APRIL 29, 1937 



I V. Group Attends 
Co-ed "Y" Conference 

pjORM GETS HEAD POST 

Twelve Colleges Participate in 
Semi-annual Convention at 
E-town 

About one hundred students from 
twelve colleges of eastern Pennsylvania 
attended the Go- Educational Student "Y" 
Conference held at Elizabethtown College 
over the weekend of April 23-25. 

Elwood Needy of Lebanon Valley Col- 
lege, president of the Y. M. C. A. State 
Student Council, acted as convention 
chairman and presided at all the sessions, 
including the conference banquet on Sat- 
urday evening. One of the high lights 
of the gathering was the election of Paul 
Horn of Lebanon Valley College to suc- 
ceed Needy as the president of the coun- 
cil. Lebanon Valley thus seems to have 
somewhat of a monopoly on the presi- 
dential robe. Horn is an able man and 
should wield the gavel successfully, or 
whatever is used. 

Dr. Clyde A. Lynch, president of Leb- 
anon Valley College, represented the fa- 
culty of the college at the conference 
banquet. 

Dr. Ralph W. ^Schlosser. president of 
Elizabethtown College, gave the official 
welcome of the college to the visiting 
delegates in the opening session Friday- 
evening. The principle speaker in de- 
veloping the conference theme, "Living 
Christ," was Dr. J. M. Artman of Chi- 
cago, Illinois, editor of the magazine 
"Character", and the head of various 
other religious and educational organi- 
zations, who addressed the conference on 
% Living Christ Only an Ideal?", "The 
Student Leader, the Student Organiza- 
" on and Campus Religion", and "My 
{Continued on page 4, Column 3) 



No. 3 



College Band Active 



Last Thursday the band of L. V. C. 
spent the afternoon and evening in 
Waynesboro. 

In the afternoon the boys played 
to an audience of about seven hundred 
in the Waynesboro High School. The 
applause received by the band indi- 
cated the high degree of enthusiasm 
with which they were received. 

Supper was served at six o'clock in 
the United Brethren Church after 
which most of our boys returned to 
the high school to listen to a rehearsal 
of the Waynesboro band which was 
preparing numbers for the state con- 
test. Professor Rutledge was asked 
by the director of the Waynesboro 
group for criticisms and suggestions. 

After the rehearsal the majority of 
the school band with their director, 
Lynn G. Brenneman, came to the 
church to listen to the concert which 
was given by our boys. 

This evening the band is to appear 
in Chambersburg and on next Tues- 
day evening in Red Lion. With the 
exception of the appearance on May 
Day and the annual campus concert, 
the Red Lion engagement will bring 
the season to a close. 



LESTER'S BAND AT 
FRESHMAN FROLIC 



Cri 



fell's Specialty Lends Novel- 
ty; Seventy-five Couples 
Attend 



^nty-five C0U pi es attended the 
^hnian Frolic on Friday night, April 

'Paving it to be one of the most sue- 
U1 social functions of the year. Phil 
t ett s OI(,|le s tr a played and en- 

i) efs ained With a £' r,) i>P of specialty nutn- 

foaT bCSt ret ' eiml no velty was the ori- 
. n, "nb er written by Harry Criswel] 

Ifo Kave vtrv }i(><>< ' m, P ersona - 

^-off best ""Personation was his 
W&j. ° n Resident Roosevelt on a 
H;ir rv . ip alo "g the Quittie in which 
"* Dr 1 !'" tl,ted " (> t only the words of 
;. e] ; sid ent, but the facial 

H 



SOCIETY HOST TO 
RECENT MEMBERS 



Will Hold Banquet at Harrisburg 
Civic Club Tonight; Faculty 
Members Attend 



Along with this 



expressions 



Phi Alpha Epsilon will hold a ban- 
quet and reception for new members 
tonight at six o'clock at the Civic Club 
in Harrisburg. This is the third annual 
banquet of the honorary scholastic so 
ciety of Lebanon Valley College. Alumni 
and faculty members will be the hosts to 
the new members. Sterling McNees, 
president of the Pennsylvania Bar As 
sociation, will be the speaker. 

The society was organized in 1935 for 
the purpose of stimulating scholastic in- 
terest and activity among undergraduate 
students. An average of eighty-eight per 
cent must be attained in all subjects to 
qualify one for membership in the so- 
ciety. The roll now consists of twenty- 
one alumni and nine newly elected mem- 
bers, with one member, Frances Kaiser, 
35, having died last summer. 

The new members are Richard Baus, 
William Earnest, Karl Flocken, Charles 
Kinney, Burrit Lupton, Eleanor Lynch, 
Francis MacMullen, Grace Naugle, and 
John Zimmerman. Faculty officers are 
Dean A. H. M. Stonecipher, president ; 
Dr. H. H. Shenk, vice-president ; and 
Dr. Stella Johnson Stevenson, secretary. 



"estr 



specialty the 

Played "Annie's Cousin Fan- 
n d "ti t^. 

ht ers „ mg H1s Tnree 



L Hh the dance was well attended, 
% „. IS a noticeable absence of the 
fe *eat * ° f the Fr eshman class. 
P Shirt ^ ni,,| "ber of couples were the 
Tk Crits - 

L^ar " Was wel1 chaperoned by 

SandM d Mrs ' C:,rme;,n nnd l>ro - 
Snafcj ' Stokes - Mrs - Mary Green 
e to attend due to illness. 



May Day Innovation 



The canopied throne of the May 
Queen will be situated in front of 
North Hall this year. To provide a 
more advantageous seating arrange- 
ment than the traditional one, the 
Queen of the May- Lois Harbold, 
will be seated at the opposite end of 
the campus from the customary loca- 
tion of the focal point of attention. 

Another innovation is the introduc- 
tion of twin May-poles, according to 
the plans formulated by Miss Hender- 
son, who is directing the preparation 
for Lebanon Valley's annual May 
Day, May 8. 



LIBRARY WORKERS 
MEET ON CAMPUS 

Delegates of College and Public 
Libraries Discuss Library 
Policy 

The Harrisburg District of the Penn- 
sylvania Library Association held its an- 
nual conference on the Lebanon Valley 
College campus on Thursday morning, 
April 22. Thirty-five delegates, including 
librarians of both college and public 
libraries, were present from Dauphin, 
Adams, York, Lebanon, and Lancaster 
counties. 

The morning session began at ten- 
thirty when Dr. Lynch delivered an ad- 
dress of greeting to the body. After the 
business session, conducted by Miss Mar- 
garet Critchfield of Lancaster, round 
table discussions were held on the work 
of the library outside the walls, or the 
library as the center of the community. 
These were based on the topics of "Con- 
tacts of an old library", "A new library", 
and "A college library." 

All the discussion centered about the 
library as a general asset to the commu- 
nity, and especially to those people who, 
although ordinarily not interested, are 
brought into contact with the organiza- 
tion by an aggressive library policy. The 
work of the library as an aid to business 
and professional clubs, exfension work to 
elementary school-children, and book ex- 
hibits to stimulate interest was discussed. 
Following a roll-call of libraries in 
which the new contacts that each had 
been making were named, Miss Alice R. 
Eaton, librarian of the Harrisburg Pub- 
lic Library, discussed Pennsylvania's 
place in the field of literature, with spe- 
cial emphasis placed on the ballads and 
folk-lore of the Welsh coal miners and 
similar social groups. 

Luncheon was served to the group in 
the College Dining Hall at one-thirty, 

(Confirmed on Page 3, Column 4) 



Promenade Lead 



er 




Fridinger Elected 
Junior Prom Leader 

VOTE HELD IN CHAPEL 



Popular Junior Chosen to 
Lead Annual Event at Her- 
shey 



MISSIONARY SPEAKS 
IN CHAPEL SERVICE 



WALTER FRIDINGER 

From drill field to dance floor 



Who has been elected by popular vote 
of the entire student body to head the 
annual Junior Prom at the Hershey Park 
Ballroom, May 14. 



PHILO DINNER DANCE 
AT YORKTOWN HOTEL 



Zel Smith and His Pennsylvania 
Aces Play for Seventieth Anni- 
versary 



Dr. Charles W. Leader Tells Stu- 
dent Body of His Work in Af- 
rica 



On Monday morning Lebanon Val- 
ley College was paid a visit by Dr. 
Charles W« Leader, a furloughed mis- 
sionary from Africa. Dr. Leader has, 
since his graduation from Indiana Cen- 
tral College, served the United Brethren 
denomination nine years — three terms of 
three years each — at Tiama in the West 
Coast region. 

Presenting him to the morning chapel 
ludience, Mrs. J. R. Engle, wife of the 
President of Lebanon Valley's Board of 
Trustees, stated that Dr. Leader was 
imong the very alblest speakers num- 
bered among (Mir fifty-eight missionaries. 
Her claim was verified in the address 
which followed. 

Certainly Dr. Leader possesses a most 
forceful and enthusiastic style of deliv- 
ery. His incisive mannerisms indicate a 
generous supply of vital energy. Indeed 
this last is an essential in the life of an 
African missionary, which is nothing, if 
not strenuous. 

For in Africa, as everyone knows, 
there are only two seasons, the wet and 
the dry. "Dry," however, is really a 
misnomer, Dr. Leader contended, both 
seasons being alike wet. During the so- 
(Continued on Page 4, Column 2) 



Philo is primed to step out on Satur- 
day, May 8, to celebrate its seventieth 
anniversary. On that evening all Philo- 
kosmians will journey to the beautiful 
Yorktowne Hotel, York, where the soci- 
ety will hold its annual dinner dance. 
After the dinner society members and 
guests will dance for the remainder of 
the evening to the rhythmical swing 
tunes of Zel Smith and his Pennsylvania 
Aces. 

The affair will be the second consecu- 
tive dinner dance to be held by Philo ,at 
the Yorktowne, and all reports indicate 
that this year's affair will far out-shine 
last year's gala event. Kenneth East- 
land, anniversary president, when ap- 
proached on the subject of anniversary 
arrangements and plans, declared: 

"All plans are nearing completion for 
Philo's Second Annual Dinner Dance. 1 
would like to ask the society members 
to cooperate in every way possible in 
completing these plans. Decisions re- 
garding tables and favors must be made 
no later than Tuesday, and to be assured 

(Continued on Page 4, Column 1) 



After the chapel service last Monday, 
April 26, the student body elected Wal- 
ter P. Fridinger to be the leader of the 
Annual Junior Prom which will be held 
in the Hershey Park Ballroom. 

Fridinger and his partner will consult 
with Prof. D. Clark Carmean, the Prom 
Director, and will then lead the prome- 
nade on May 14. 

Previous to the general election of last 
Monday each of the four classes chose 
its nominee from the male members of 
the Junior Class. The Senior Class 
nominated Alan Schuler; the Juniors, 
Walter Fridinger ; the Sophomores, Dean 
Gasteiger ; and the Freshmen, John Wal- 
mer. 

Walter Fridinger, more commonly 
known as "Pete", besides being an out- 
standing fullback on our football team, 
is also a popular socialite on the campus. 
Leaving his home in Shippensburg. 
"Pete" spent his freshman year at the 
Virginia Military institute. While at 
V. M. I. he was on the "rat" football 
team composed entirely of freshmen. 

The Junior Prom was introducd on 
the Lebanon Valley Campus eight years 
ago. Recent classes have made it tra- 
ditional to hold this, the last formal 
dance of the school year, in the Hershey 
Park Ballroom. Light, romantic dresses 
and dark coats with white flannels add 
to the festive atmosphere which makes 
this dance the most coveted of the year. 
With "Pete" leading to the tune of Paul 
Tremaine and his orchestra, the Prom 
this year promises to be the biggest social 
event ever staged by the students of 
Lebanon Valley College. 

Tickets may be secured from any mem- 
ber of the Junior Class- The price is 
one dollar per person. Start to save your 
money now as you can't afford to miss 
this year's Junior Prom! 



Y. W. C. A. Holds Tea 



The Y. W. C. A. entertained the 
Freshmen and Juniors of the College 
at a tea held in North Hall parlor 
on Wednesday, April 21, from four to 
six o'clock. A delightful musical pro- 
gram was presented by a trio com- 
posed of Dorothy Zeiters, Dorothy 
Yeakle, and John Zettlemoyer. They 
played Brahm's "Hungarian Rhapsody 
Number Five" and "A Romance" by 
Debussy. Mrs. P. A. W. Wallace was 
among those present. Mrs. Clyde A. 
Lynch presided over the tea table. 
The concluding part of the afternoon 
was enjoyably spent playing games. 



New Faces Appear 

In Studio Recital 

An interesting recital was presented on 
Tuesday evening in Engle Hall at seven 
o'clock. All the selections were present- 
ed on different instruments with the ad- 
dition of vocal numbers by Elizabeth 
Bender. 

Dennis Geesey opened the recital by 
playing as a trombone solo "My Song of 
Songs" by Smith. He was followed by 
Dorothy Bollinger, cellist, who played 
the "Pilgrims' Chorus" (from "Tann- 
hauser") by Wagner. 

As a flute solo Catherine Mills played 
"Intermezzo" (from "Cavalliera Rusti- 
cana") by Mascagni. Mildred Gangwer 
then played "Variation on a Swiss Song" 
by Beethoven. 

Following the piano number were two 
vocal selections by Elizabeth Bender. 
She sang "Sheep and Lambs" by Homer, 
and "Still wie die Nacht" by Bohn. 

The concluding number was by John 
Fink, a special student on the violin. He 
played "Tre Giorni" by Pergolesi and 
"Deutschcr Tanz" by Mozart and ar- 
ranged by Burmester. 




PAGE TWO 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, APRIL 29, 1937 



£a Hie (Ealltgmm? 



ESTAUIiTSHTCD 1925 



A weekly publication by the Undergraduate Students of Lebanon Valley College 



EDITOR-IN CHIEF 

Charles Boyd Shaffer 



The Week In Review 



L W. R. Active 



EDITORIAL BOARD 

ASSOCIATE EDITOR 

Mary Louise Stoner, '38 

FEATURE EDITOR SPORTS EDITOR 

William F. Clark, '39 Roger B. Saylor, '38 

REPORTORIAL STAFF 

Clarence Lehman, '39 
Robert Long, '39 
Sarah MacEwen, '39 
Alice Richie, '39 
Samuel Rutter, '39 
Barbara Bowman, '40 
Carl Ehrharl, '40 
Evelyn Evans, '40 
John Ness, '40 
Louise Saylor, '40 



Clifford Barnhart, '38 
Elizabeth Bender, '38 
Sylva Harclerode, '38 
Ernestine Jagnesak, '38 
Wanda Price, '38 
Calvin Spitler, '38 
Theresa Stefan, '38 
Howard Baier. '39 
Robert Clippinger, '39 
Thomas Guinivan, '39 



BUSINESS BOARD 
BUSINESS MANAGER CIRCULATION MANAGER 

Curvin N. Dellinger, '38 Ernest Weirick, '39 

ASSISTANT ASSISTANT 

Raymond Smith, '39 Warren Sechrist, '40 



Single Copies 
Subscription 



5 cents 

.$1.00 per year 



Entered at the Annville, Pa., post office as second class matter, under the Act of 

Mar pubiis 1 Sd weekly through the school period, except during holiday vacation and 
examination week. 



K1PI««««NT«D FOR NATIONAL ADVBRTHIN* »T 

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Colltft Publishers Riprtttntitiv* *. 
420 Madiion Ave. New York. N. Y. 

CHICAGO • BOSTON - SAN FRANCISCO 
LOS ANSKLSS - PORTLAND - ««ATTLE 



Vol. XIV 



THURSDAY, APRIL 29, 1937 



No. 3 



THE MAY DAY SITUATION 



One of the major, if not insurmountable, difficulties that the Physical Educa- 
tion department encounters while preparing to stage May Day each year, is a lack 
of eligible males from all classes necessary to the production. On the whole, the 
women respond fairly well, but even there there is much to be desired. 

The time was when participation in the maypole dance was an honored prerog- 
ative of members of the Junior class only. Now even freshmen are pressed into 
service in an agonized effort to fill out the complement. The majority of Junior 
men would consider it an affront to their manliness if approached with the sug- 
gestion. 

We believe that May Day is one of iliose events that go toward rounding out 
the college year; that it is one of the most desirable of the extra-curricular enter- 
prises. In view of this, the prevailing Lack of interest in it is to be deplored. 

If the people who condemn this occasion were to only drop their misconcep- 
tions of dignity and virility, and think more of cooperation for the common good, 
May Day could be made into the most brilliant festival of the year. One that would 
do credit to college and individual alike. 



The Life Work Recruits were unusual- 
ly busy over last week-end with three 
teams covering six deputations. Daniel 
Shearer has been working very hard to 
make these deputations possible. 

A group under the direction of Howard 
N. Peffley went to Greenmount, Md., 
here Rev. D. K. Reisinger is the min- 
ister and also to the Manchester, Md. 
circuit, where Rev. I. G. Naugle preaches. 
The morning services were held at the 
Greenmount U. B. Church, while the 
afternoon and evening sessions were at 
Mt. Zion and Bixlers on the Manchester 
charge. The subject of the morning wor- 
ship service by Howard Peffley was 
God's Love. In the evening he spoke on 
The Reality of God. Harry Deaven spoke 
at Mt. Zion. The special music was 
rendered by Dorothy Zeiters, cellist, and 
Elnora Reeder, vocalist, both accom- 
panied by Grace Geyer. The singing was 
led by Elnora Reeder. 

Elwood Needy officiated on the depu- 
tation to the Lititz United Brethren 
Church, Rev. J. C. H. Light, minister. 
The devotions were conducted by Thom- 
as Guinivan. Harold Beamesderfer 
preached on The N-czv Commandment 
Special numbers were rendered by Vir- 
ginia Niessner, soloist, accompanied by 
Irene Ranck. The pianist was Rose 
Tschopp. 

The third deputation was to the Manor 
Charge, Rev. Sherriff, minister. Ethel 
Houtz was in charge of the services. 
Edith Metzger favored the audience with 
vocal and piano solos. Paul Slonaker 
spoke at the Stehman Church on The 
Parable of the Vineyard, while Paul 
Myers preached to the Green Hill au- 
dience on Being Weighed in the Bal- 
ances. 

The weekly meeting of the Life Work 
Recruits was opened last Thursday even 
ing in North Hall Parlor to the soft 
strains of Near to the Heart of God 
The evening meditation was read by 
Audrie Fox. After singing Day Is Dying 
in the West Paul Horn took charge of 
the devotions. A cellist solo was beauti- 
fully played by Dorothy Zeiters accom 
panied by Grace Geyer. 

The evening speaker was Dr. Shenk, 
who spoke on College Friendships. He 
gave interesting sketches concerning 
friendships taken from the lives of great 
religious leaders. The meeting was 
brought to a close by a number of vol- 
untary sentence prayers. 



N( 



Educators Exposition 

The Hershey Public Schools are pre- 
senting their annual Public School Im- 
position at Hershey, Wednesday and 
Thursday evenings, April 28 and 2Q, 
from 7 until 9:45 o'clock. The purpose 
of the exposition is to display all types 
of the regular work done in projects, 
contracts, and special units by the prac- 
tical arts and the commercial depart- 
ment; to acquaint teachers and visitors 
with the achievements of the students ; 
to promote interest and enthusiasm 
among the parents and visitors ; and to 
effect a feeling 'of general goodwill in the 
township. 

In each classroom the work of that 
particular class is displayed, and in some 
rooms 'a regular recitation is held. The 
teachers will be in their report rooms to 
answer any questons and explain the 
display of the work done under their su- 
pervision. In the printing, automobile me- 
chanics, agriculture and plumbing shops 
extensive preparations have been made. 

Dr. O. E. Reynolds, Head of the Edu- 
cation Department of Lebanon Valley 
College, is attending the Exposition with 
a number of his student teachers and 
members of his education classes as a 
means of adding to their knowledge of 
teaching techniques. The Exposition will 
prove very interesting to all who arc in- 
terested in educational procedures. 



Biologists Travel 

Saturday, April 24, Dr. Light and sev- 
eral students motored to the Severn ri- 
ver near Annapolis in search of a certain 
species of long-necked clam. This species 
can only be found in such # brackish water 
but unfortunately the wind was unfav- 
■ nable so that at low tide the water did 
not recede far enough to enable them to 
find any. 

An interesting animal belonging to the 
phylum Ctenophora was found in great 
numbers along the beach. While bring- 
ing them back to the laboratory they 
were somewhat shaken up so that they 
were no longer recognizable and had to 
be discarded. Those accompanying Dr. 
Light were Duey linger, Boyd Shaeffer, 
and Clarence Lehman. The clams were 
to be used in some light-reaction experi- 
ments. Dr. Light was well acquainted 
with this species as he did considerable 
work on them while at Johns Hopkins. 



PROPOSED EXAM SCHEDULE 



Old Gradi 



On Saturday, April 24, the announce- 
ment was made of the engagement of 
Miss Ethel Hower '31 of Sand Hill to 
Rufus Darkes of Lebanon. The wedding 
will take place in June. 

Announcement was recently made of 
the engagement of Allen Ranck '34 to 
Miss Mildred Stauffer of New Holland. 
Miss Stauffer is teaching the second 
grade of the New Holland public schools. 
Ranck is attending Bonebrake Theologic- 
al Seminary. 




Chapel Program 

At the chapel program on Friday morn- 
ing, April 30, which will be conducted as 
usual by the conservatory students, the 
Emaus High School band directed by An- 
thony Jagnesak will play. "Tony" grad- 
uated just last year. 

The band has been organized only since 
September and has already attained a 
degree of proficiency which merits its 
appearance in concert. About forty 
young musicians comprise the band. 

The chapel program will be held at 
9:50 instead of the usual hour. Classes 
will meet at 8:00, 9:00, 10:20, and 11 :i5. 

At noon the band will have lunch in 
the dining hall alter which they will 
make a tout of the Hershey Chocolate 
factory. 



1TE — Report all conflicts to the Reg- 
istrar's Office as soon as possible. 

MONDAY, MAY 24 
8:30 

Business Administration 63 

Chemistry 48 

French 56 

Education 462 

History 126 

Latin 64 

Mathematics 23 (Black) 
Philosophy 112 
Political Science 16 

1:30 

Chemistry 54 
English 26 

TUESDAY, MAY 25 
8:30 

German 16 — >Sci. 
Chemistry 38 
Education 124 
Education 182 
English 162 
French 36 
Mathematics 74 
Sociology 32 
1:30 

Chemistry 28 
French 26 
German 56 

Mathematics 23 (Grimm) 
Philosophy 32 

WEDNESDAY, MAY 26 
8:30 

Education 136-A 
German 26 
History 16 
History 42 
History 64 
Latin 26 
Physics 54 
1:30 

Biology 64 
English 16 
History 24-B 
Psychology 42 

THURSDAY, MAY 27 

8:30 

Bible 72 

Business Administration 153 
German 06 
German 16-A 
History 24- A 
Philosophy 12 



1:30 

Business Administration 11 
History 113 
History 34-~A 
Philosophy 26 
Political Science 114 
Psychology 23-A 

FRIDAY, MAY 28 
8:30 

Biology 48 

Business Administration 36 
English 524 
Greek 26 
History 44-A 
Latin 16 
Mathematics 36 
Mathematics 84 
Political Science 13 

1:30 

Biology 18 
Physics 18 

SATURDAY, MAY 29 
8:30 

French 06 
French 16 
English 542 

TUESDAY, JUNE 1 
8:30 

Education 33 
English 52 
Greek 16 
Mathematics 46 
Sociology 23 

1:30 

Hygiene 12 
Psychology 23 

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 2 
8:30 

Biology 28 
Economics 33 
Education 73 
Greek 66 
History 44-C 
Latin 33-B 
Mathematics 123 
Mathematics 56 

1:30 
Bible 14 

THURSDAY, JUNE 3 
8:30 

Bible 26 
Chemistry 18 
Economics 16 
Economics 26 
English 66 

History 44-B 




"How do you know she's coming ?' 

"I called her last night after seven 

,11 

at the reduced Long Distance rate. 

• Dates for dances and plans for parties 
are quickly and easily made by tel© 
phone. Low rates are in effect ALL V 
SUNDAY and after seven every nig^- 

THE BELL TELEPHONE COMPANY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



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4 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, APRIL 29, 1937 



PAGE THREE 



Sporti 



Features 



Athletic Angles 



THOSE FUTURE OPPONENTS 




Although Chief Metoxen's Flying Dutchmen have 
nothing hut rain as their diamond story so far, our 
future opponents have been doing some playing be- 
tween showers. According to the results of the eight 
games played last Saturday, the Billets, Capka, 
Kress and Company will meet up with some line hit- 
ting aggregations. In league play Albright's Lions 
shellacked the Hears of Ur sinus, 16-6, in a game 
marred by 13 errors. Billet's pitching should easily 
master these nines if they play so loosely when they 
come to Annville. The Drexel Dragon sent out fair 
warnings to coming invaders by trouncing the University of Delaware 12-2. 
p,ast Drexel encounters have proved to be batting festivals for L. V. C, but 
indications show that a new era has arrived in the Dragons' liar. The Get- 
tysburg Bullets did well by themselves even if Temple did come off the dia- 
mond on the long end of a B-2 count. Woe unto us if Paul Billet has an off- 
day next Tuesday. Those Bullets are plenty good, and they have four or five 
pitchers to our one. It is extremely fortunate that they can use only one at 
a time. 

Of our non-league opponents Moravian seems to be the strongest. On 
Saturday they added one more to their string of conquests when the P.M.C. 
went down to a 9-7 count. These Bethlehem boys either win their games or 
give their opponents a good scare. Last year Johnny Tindall beat them 3-1. 
Can we repeat? Little was indicated as to the strength of the Mt. St. Mary's 
nine which lost to a good Dickinson team, 0-3. Six Swarthmore errors gave 
Muhlenberg a 9-7 win. It may he of some interest to note that Susquehanna's 
Crusaders were soundly trounced by the Bloomsburg State Teachers, 22-8. 

At any rate, Lebanon Valley's schedule is so arranged that, if necessary, 
Billet can start all but one of the games. Since Ursinus and Albright are met 
on consecutive days, another pitcher will have to start against the Bears. The 
logical choice is Marshall Frey, the Chambersburg lad, who has been working 
hard and really deserves a chance to show what he can do. At present it is 
doubtful if he can go nine innings, but things may be different by the seventh 
of Mav. 



Baseball Vs. Rain 



Rain ! rain ! rain ! and more rain, that 
is why the Lebanon Valley diamond tos- 
sers are slowly going crazy. The games 
with both Albright and the Palmyra 
A. A. scheduled for last week were 
washed out, so the players had to be 
content with a practice game between the 
Regulars and the Irregulars on Satur- 
day afternoon. 

The Irregulars proved just that as 
they blew the game 10-2 in spite of a 
fine pitching effort by Marshall Frey. 
Errors and poor judgment accounted for 
at least seven of the Regulars' runs. Af- 
ter a scoreless first inning the Regulars 
started pecking away at Frey's delivery 
with two runs in the second and con- 
tinuing with two in the fourth, one in 
'he fifth, two in the sixth, and as a grand 
finale three more in the seventh and final 
■nning. The Irregulars scored lone tal- 
lles »i the third and sixth frames. Only 
the latter was earned. Bill Scherfel, 
Pitching for the Regulars, did well, al- 
^ Wi ng only four hits and fanning seven. 
k" e star on the attack was Adolph Cap- 
With three hits, two of them genuine 
a,ld one a bit shady. P. Billett, Davies, 
a nd Ludwig chimed in with two apiece. 
t er 16 most encoura ging sign of the af- 



I 0011 was the fine defensive play of the 
e §ulars' infield, especially the keystone 
T , mbin ation of Ralph Billett and Capka. 
that* ^ a ^ erec ^ m ever y possible ball 



and 



c ame that way and sent it swiftly 



acc urately to its proper destination. 

av ies at third and Poloniak at first 
served 

afo worthy running mates for the 

f Mentioned. The outer line of de- 
set 1 to perform up to the standard 
r en, y the inn elders, but time should 
both y that situat ' on - Tlie catchers for 
sides, Kress and Walk, turned in 
e ditaKl 

k «uie receiving jobs. Danny Seiver- 
am e rregulars ' shortstop, played a flashy 
, e for the misfits, handling all his 
J**s flawlessly, 
the fi Unfortun ate accident occurred 



rst 



inning when Carl Dempsey, Ir- 
m hardener, dislocated his arm as 
alk k a °k to nrst Dase after forcing 
|& j. e ' n j ur y probably ends Demp- 
la >nond activities for the season. 



L. V. Stage 



The recent practices of "Three-Cor- 
nered Moon" have revealed the inmost 
feelings of Harold Phillips toward his 
roommate, Ken Eastland. The other 
night Mr. Phillips either from a desire 
for mastery or from a love for his lead- 
ing man threw a Philo chair at Mr. 
Eastland and succeeded in artistically 
loosening the joints in the chair back. 
Wotta man ! 

» » * 

The cast has worked up a novel idea 
to replace the embryo romances every- 
one is accustomed to seeing as the re- 
sult of play practices. It seems that the 
villain and the hero of the play have de- 
veloped quite an unusual blend of voices 
to summon the complacent heroine from 
her peaceful abode to rehearsals on time. 
Too bad such methods had not matured 
during other performances. 

* * * 

"Three-Cornered Moon" was written 
by Gertrude Tonkonogy, who was the 
lady who revolutionized the idea that 
"life is a dome of many-colored glass" 
by saying tliat "life is a slap in the 
face." From the sound of her vivacity 
we would venture to say that her play 
will be something new in the line of 

campus productions. 

* • # 

The play itself deals with the read- 
justment of the once wealthy Rimplegar 
family. In it we Shall learn how a col- 
lege student may become a lifeguard and 
how a family can cut down on its rigid 
budget of $10 a week for victrola rec- 
ords. 

* • » 

It appears that the Amalgamated As- 
sociation of GeepS has run afoul of the 
powers that be by appropriating lumber 
designated for purposes of May Day. Go 
to it boys! You're only in college once. 

* • » 

SO gather round, kiddies, and view 
the latest cross between The Admirable 
Orichton and Tobacco Road. The slaugh- 
ter will take place May 7. 



Faculty Doings 



Miss Henderson, director of women's 
athletics, attended the National Physical 
Education Convention at the Pennsylva- 
nia Hotel in New York City last week. 
The keynote of the meeting was the in- 
telligent use of the increasing amount of 
leisure time. All fields of physical ac- 
tivity, especially hiking, were recommend- 
ed. The fact that adults need physical 
activity as much as young people was 
also stressed. 

Dr. Richie will deliver the opening 
address on Sunday evening of the cele- 
bration of the Nineteenth Anniversary 
of the Pine Grove United Brethren 
Church. 



Conserve Notes 



On Friday morning, April 30, a group 
of conservatory students will journey to 
Millersburg to present a program for as- 
sembly. 

Students participating are Marianne 
Treo, Russel Hatz, John Zettlemoyer, 
George Yokum, Donald Worley, Earl 
Unger, and Sara Light. 

Jack Schuler of last year's graduating 
class is supervisor of music in Millers- 
burg. 



• • • 



Yesterday morning the thirty-five 
piece junior band of the Hershey schools 
was presented in a program in the Der- 
ry Township High School auditorium 
during the assembly hour. The band is 
under the sole supervision of seniors of 
the conservatory, and yesterday morning 
was conducted by Esther Kopenhaver, 
Sara Light, Edna Binkley, William 
Black, and Earl Unger. 



LIBRARY WORKERS 

MEET ON CAMPUS 



(Continued from page 1) 



during which period Professor Lynwood 
Lingenfelter of Millersville State Teach- 
ers' College spoke on "The Appeal of 
the Short Story." The necessity of a 
short story's vital connection with the 
life of the people themselves was stressed. 
Dr. and Mrs. Lynch and Mrs. Mary C. 
Green were the guests of the Associa- 
tion at the luncheon ; and musical se- 
lections were presented to an apprecia- 
tive audience by Marainne Treo, Donald 
Worley, Dorothy Zeiters, Dorothy Yeak- 
el and John Zettlemoyer. 

After the luncheon the group visited 
the College Library and then departed. 
This was the first meeting of the Library 
Association on Lebanon Valley's cam- 
pus, the invitation having been extended 
by Lebanon Valley at last year's con- 
ference. 



ennis 



Vs. R 



am 



Inopportune rains succeeded in wiping 
out the tennis matches scheduled to be 
played against Ursinus, Lutheran Theo- 
logical Seminary, and Albright this past 
week. Since the players are all in dire 
need of practice this is quite a setback. 
In fact the courts were not fit for use for 
a whole week following the opening 
match against Elizabethtown. Once the 
team does get into action it is expected 
to progress rapidly and turn in a fine 
record. 



Dr. Lynch to Speak 

Dr. Lynch will deliver an address on 
Sunday afternoon in the Bethlehem 
United Brethren Church at Gettysburg. 
Monday and Tuesday will be spent in 
Dayton, Ohio, at a board meeting of the 
United Brethren Church. Then on Friday 
he will attend the conference of the Am- 
erican Council of Education which con- 
venes in New York City. 



Mail Schedule Effective April 26, 1937 



ARRIVAL OF MAIL TRAINS 



From the West 

4:15 A.M. 
10:09 A.M. 

3:53 P.M. 
Outgoing Mails Close at the Postoffice 

6:30 A. M. for trains arriving at 6:52 A. M. 
9:30 A. M. for train arriving at 10:03 and 10:09 A 
3:30 P. M. for train arriving at 3:53 P. M. 
5:30 P. M. for train arriving at 6:08 P. M. 

SCHEDULE OF WINDOW SERVICE 

Weekdays— 7:00 A. M. until 6:00 P. M. Lobby open 5:30 A. M. until 6:30 P. M. 
Saturdays — 7:00 A. M. until 1:00 P. M. Lobby open until 6:30 P. M. 
Holidays — No window service. Lobby open until 10:30 A. M. with mail dis- 
patches at 6:30 and 9:30 A. M. 



From the East 

6:52 A.M. 
10:03 P.M. 
6:08 P.M. 

Direction of Dispatch 
West and South 
M. All Points 
East 

All Points 




INDIAN 
BRIDE6SDOM PIPE 



I KNOW rrfe 
AM INDIAN 
PIPE, BUT 
•WHY DO YOU 
CALL. IT A 



ITS ONE OF THE RAREST 
AMD MOST PECULIAR PIPES 
EVER DISCOVERED. IT'S 
MADE OF SANDSTONE, 
AND IT GETS IT S 





the double stem, naturally 
Suggests its use n inoi an 
matrimonial ceremonies 



SMOKING THE BRIDE -GROOM PIPE 
WAS EVIDENTLY THE INDIAN WAY 
OF BEGINNING A PEACEFUL, 
HAPPY UNION 




WELL, JUDGE, MY SINGLE STEM 
PIPE AND PRINCE ALBERT ARE 

A MIGHTY PEACEFUL COMBINATION J 
^TQQ. IT SUITS ME TO A'T7 j- 




PRINCE ALBERT MONEY- 
BACK GUARANTEE 



aim OFFER 



pipefuls of fragrant tobacco in 
every 2-oz. tin of Prince Albert 



Smoke 20 fragrant pipefuls of 
Prince Albert. If you don't find 
it the mellowest, tastiest pipe 
tobacco you ever smoked, re- 
turn the pocket tin with the rest 
of the tobacco in it to us at any 
time within a month from this 
date, and we will refund full 
purchase price, plus postage. 

(Signed) R. J. Reynolds 
Tobacco Company, Winston - 
Salem, North Carolina. 




Prince Albert :: - 



PAGE FOUR 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, APRIL 29, 1937 



archy 
and 
mehitabel 



with apologies to don marquis 



mehitalbel one of the girls clown here 
was wondering about you she has been 
wondering ever since i told her you 
mehitabel are my platonic friend 
phoo she said who would want a boy 
friend even a platonic boy friend 
like archy the lower case cockroach 
who can not even reach the 
shift key or punctuate on a 
typewriter 

i could not get romantic over a 
cockroach anyway who could 
mehitabel could i said mehitabel 
can get romantic Over me 
mehitabel i said is mehitabel the 
cat that is the girl i am writing to 
mehitabel can can t you mehitabel 
by the way you might be interested 
to know that we have had big- 
doings here since i last wrote 
you 

first there is mr esbenshade 
who was recently surprised to 
find the planks for the queens 
throne that they use cm may day 
strangely abbreviated 
he also found that the lumber which 
philo will use in the scenery for 
three cornered moon strangely 
ressembled it 

this puts the geeps who built the 
scenery in a hot spot 
they will swipe the rest of it 
they say 

we are nothing daunted we 
will show him 

and for three successive nights 

last week mr bulota that big man who 

plays football and mines coal 

thought when he went to go to bed 

that he was a victim of the dread 

disease which is called b o 

jeez he said i ve got it bad i 

can smell it when i go to bed 

although naturally i bathe with 

lifeboy 

mr bulota says the thing worried him 
for three nights i worried about it 
he told me 

for three whole nights and then 

and then i said 

and then he said 

i looked in my bed and found 

a mackerel 

and there is also the case of 

doyle summer who did not learn any 

american slang while he was in 

africa 

that is all right the waiters told 

him we will teach you we 

will give you one new expression 

every day and you must ask people 

what it means until 

you can remember it 

now here is the first one which 

you must ask that girl there 

surely said doyle i will 

ask her and so he did whereupon 

she had a convulsion and turned 

a deep bright shade of sienna 

i can not tell you what the words 

were mehitabel the postmaster says i 

would surely be 

arrested 

well so long mehitabel and don t 

forget to wrile because i have got 

to prove mehitaJbel the cat is my girl. 

archy 



PHILO DINNER DANCE 

AT YORKTOWN HOTEL 



(Continued from page 1) 



of having proper seating arrangements, 
Philo members should contact Robert 
Kell. I should like to impress on the 
members the fact that dinner will begin 



May Day Processional 



The processional which will be used 
at ,the May Day fete has been composed 
by Helen Butterwick of the conservatory. 

Miss Butterwick has cleverly arranged 
the number particularly for this occa- 
sion, and she has scored the selection 
for band. It is of necessity dignified in 
character, but toward the end of the 
composition a number of our familiar 
school songs have been embodied in the 
work, such as the "Song of Colleges" 
and "Lebanon Valley" to the tune of "On 
Wisconsin-" 

The school would appreciate more 
studentst who would be willing to give 
up their Easter vacation for such worthy 
projects as we are told was the case with 
ihis individual. 



MISSIONARY SPEAKS 

IN CHAPEL SERVICE 



(Continued from page 1) 



called wet season one is drenched by the 
rains and by the swollen streams; in the 
dry season, by perspiration produced un- 
der the blazing tropical sun. 

Under such conditions, Dr. Leader 
further asserted, he makes his way 
through the valleys and hills of the dark 
continent. His only vehicle of transpor- 
tation is a bicycle. And not always can 
the bicycle be e nployed. Sometimes on 
the steep grades he is forced to climb. 
It becomes a liability since he must then 
support it in addition to himself. This 
turn-about practice of mutual helpful- 
ness, the speaker referred to as "co-op- 
eration/' Dr. Leader declared that al- 
though himself a native of the mountain- 
ous region about Huntingdon, he has not 
seen the equal of an African hill in 
Pennsylvania. 

Speaking of bicycles, Dr. Leader in- 
formed the chapel group that Chester 
Goodman is making good use of the 
speaker's own velocipede during his ab- 
sence. Mr. Goodman, a former student 
at Lebanon Valley, is being maintained 
on the mission field by the contributions 
of the United Brethren colleges and se- 
minary. The audience was consequently 
pleased to learn about its representative. 

But the address was not wholly made 
up of experiences. In a devotional per- 
oration, the speaker drew an analogy 
between the good life and a well ordered 
garden. Always that is reaped which was 
sown. It is foolish to suppose that be- 
cause the garden soil has neither eyes, 
ears, nor senses, we can plant anything 
and harvest what we please. Just as 
imprudent is the person who engages in 
evil actions and yet hopes for a favor- 
able outcome. We are the property of 
our Creator, and must fulfill the purpose 
for which we have been formed, Dr. 
1 .eader concluded. 



promptly at seven o'clock, and urge all 
to be on hand early so as to enjoy a 
full evening of entertainment." 

The band engaged for the evening 
seems to be a current favorite among 
Pennsylvania colleges, having filled si- 
milar engagements al Penn Slate, Dick- 
inson, and other schools. The orchestra 
committee promises that Philo dancers 
will keenly enjoy their catchy rhythms 
and predicts that stiff shirts will soften 
under the torrid strains of their music . 

Although the favors have been select- 
ed by the society, the favor committee 
was reluctant to comment on them. How- 
ever, after a lengthy cross-examination, 
Treasurer Smith admitted that this 
year's favors will be something unique 
in the history of the society. The favor 
is comprised of a handsomely matched 
two piece embossed leather writing set 
with the society insignia stamped on 
each piece. 

Prof, and Mrs. Carmcan and Dr. and 
Mrs. Black will act as chaperons on this 
occasion and be on hand to welcome the 
many alumni who have made plans to 

attend the affair. 



What They Say 



Question — Do you think politics 

arc used on litis campus? 



RAYMOND SMITH, Sophomore- 
Yes, I know they are, I've used them 
already. 

.JOHN SPEG, Senior— I wouldn't call 
it politics; I'd call it dumbness the way 
some people vote. 

CLAIRE ADAMS, Senior— Yes. I'd 
hate to give my reasons though, there 
are too many explicit ones. 

ROBERT KELL, Senior — I don't 
think the average student is interested 
enough in college affairs to bother with 
politics. 

STANLEY BULOTA, Sophomore- 
\o| yet, but just wait. 

LENA RISSER, Junior— Yes, very 
decidedly in the way elections are run. 

MARSHAL FREY, Junior— I don't 
know anything else. How should I know 
that? 



L. V. GROUP ATTENDS 

CO-ED "Y" CONFERENCE 



(Continued from page 1) 



Task and My Christ." 

Four training commissions, or group 
discussions, were held on Saturday 
morning relating to various aspects of 
Y. M. C. A. and Y. W. C. A. work 
These subjects included "Cabinet De- 
velopment and Procedure", "Analysis of 
the Religious and Social Program" and 
conclaves for association committee 
chairmen, and faculty advisers. A very 
interesting forum on international rela- 
tions on Saturday afternoon was con- 
ducted by Dr. Wilson Leon Godshall, 
Professor of Political Science and His- 
tory in Dickinson Junior College, Wil- 
liamsport. It entailed a spirited discus- 
sion and was thought most worth-while 
by all those students who attended. 

By no means was the entire convention 
devoted to the so-called higher things of 
life and to meetings of a strictly spiritual 
nature, for there was ample opportunity 
given for delegates to become acquainted 
with one another and to make new friend- 
ships. These functions were a "Get Ac- 
quainted Social" in the college gymna- 
sium, a tour of Elizabethtown and en- 
virons, and the conference banquet. Here 
wit and humor flowed in its customary 
free manner; and, although a few of the 
songs enjoyed by the natives were a bit 
ambiguous and foreign, nevertheless, the 
banquet was a great success, a success 
heightened not a little by Dr. Lynch's 
short address and repartee with Profes- 
sor Baugher, Dean of Elizabethtown 
College, who acted as toastmaster, as to 
the relative position and importance of 
the town of Annville. 

The Local "Y" organizations were rep- 
resented at the conference by Ella Mason, 
Agnes Morris, Helen Netherwood, and 
Helen Bartlett for the Y. W. C. A.; 
while Elwood Needy, Paul Horn, Vernon 
Rogers, Dennis Geesey, Kenneth Morrow, 
and Carl Ehrhart attended as delegates 
from the Y. M. C. A. 

I he other eleven colleges represented 
were Juniata. Elizabethtown, Gettysburg, 
Dickinson, Dickinson Junior College of 
Williamspiort, and six slate teachers' col- 
leges, Millersville, Kutztown, West Ches- 
ter, Shippensburg, Lock Haven, and 
Mansfield. 

The conference last week was the reg- 
ular semi-annual gathering of this na- 
ture, the session preceding this one hav- 
ing been held at Lock Haven State 
Teachers' College early in December. 
The place for the next conference will be 
decided later in the year by the execu- 
tive committee of the organization. As 
for the general worth and value of the 
conference, barring some slight incon- 
venience, the local delegation commented 
very favorably and expressed the opinion 
that it had been a must inspiring and ut- 
erly uplifting gathering. 



Vox Populi 



To I he Editor of I. a Vie: 

A few weeks ago you permitted to ap- 
pear in your column, Vox Populi, a let- 
ter from some person signing himself 
Cerberus, which is nothing more nor less 
than a nice classical way of saying 
'Hellhound," so that the title is not en- 
tirely inappropriate. 

However, the sentiments which this 
Cerberus person has chosen to express — 
in case you've forgotten, are that we 
ought, in short, to abolish the Numeral 
Eight and the Tug-o'-War because some 
of the boys get their hair mussed and 
the angels can't study — seem to me not 
only to be totally without merit, but 
also entirely without any vestige of self- 
respect or respect for the traditions 
which make Lebanon Valley and its 
ideals. 

If Cerberus is afraid he'll get his nose 
scratched, I should recommend that he 
attend Vassar instead of this place. And 
if he thinks lighting never does any 
good, just let me tell him and any one 
else like him that there's nothing like a 
good bloody fight with lots of teeth 
knocked out and gore spilling about all 
over the terrain to bring out the true 
character of a man if he has any. Of 
course, if he hasnt' any, that'll be brought 
out too, but for such poor souls, some 
one ought to build special institutions 
secluded from this big, bad, impolite 
world where they could play with their 
blocks all day long and learn embroi 
dery. No cutting paper dolls, though— 
they might cut their pretty fingers. 

Obviously for such weak-kneed idiots 
a good bout of fisticuffs can do no good, 
But I was unaware that we had any 
such at Lebanon Valley. I thought the 
student body was composed one hundred 
per cent of healthy young Americans 
willing to take the risk of getting per 
haps a black eye in order to show them- 
selves worthy of the advantages of col 
lege training and able to withstand the 
difficulties of obtaining it. I also thought 
any student would be glad to see what 
members of his class are able to show 
real personal manhood when put to a 
practical test with no time for ifs, ands, 
or buts, and that he would welcome 
the opportunity to find friends whom he 
knows from experience are not merely 
fine talkers. 

I came through the drubbing twice, 
myself, and so did all of us here. I think 
I may say too, it did us good. It showed 
us there are times when a stout heart 
counts more tlian fine clothes and a 
smooth line. It humbled those of us who 
thought otherwise. 

And so, to this Cerberus pooch I say 
phoney! Dog, you are an idiot and a 
sissy. 

Indignantly yours, 

P. B. Publico. 



For School Supplies and 
Books of all Kinds Go To: 

BOLLMAN'S 

628 Cumberland Street 
LEBANON, PA. 



RENU SHOP 

One Day Service 
Dry Cleaning, Pressing, Repairing 
11 E. Main St. ANNVILLE, PA. 



'ear 



Men's New Spring Neckw 
Polo Shirts 
Men's, Women's and Child r 

White Oxfords ^ 

JOHN HIRSH 

WAGNER and SHAUD m 

' M gr' s 



Do you postpone your hai N 
cuts? If so we urge y ou / 
give us a trial. 

Mod ern Equipment Pl Us 
Complete Stock of Readin 
Material. g 
• 

Karl's Shop 



D.L.SAYLOR& 
SONS 

Contractors 
Lumber and Coal 

ANNVILLE, PENNA. 



KREAMER BROS. 

Furniture 
Floor Coverings 
Electric Refrigerators 
Hoover Electric Sweepers 
Electric Washing Machines 

RCA Radios 
FUNERAL DIRECTORS 
Phone 144 ANNVILLE, PA. 



Meals Served Daily 

Best Sundaes in Town with 
Home Made Ice Cream 
Sandwiches, Cigarettes, Candy 

C. D. BRUNNER 

E. Main St. ANNVILLE, PA. 



DI NUNZIO 
SHOE SHOP 

"Our Motto is to Please" 
A Trial Will Convince You 
9 E. Main St., ANNVILLE, PA. 



Complete Your Food 
Supply For That Midnight 
Lunch By Stopping At 

FINK'S BAKERY 



We sell all types of baked product* 
at all hours. 




Start the day 

In the Modern way. 

Breakfast at the Pennway' 



THE PENNWAY HOTEl 



Vol 



OF 
Ca 



Welcome, Visitors 



Tmk €A\tmm 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 
LIBRARY 



Go To It, Phih 



I 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



Vol. 



xiv 



ANNVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA, THURSDAY, MAY 6, 1937 



No. 4 



Annual Examinations 
To Be Held May Day 

OFFER MANY AWARDS 

Candidates From Four States 
Will Witness May Day On 
Campus 

Glorious May Day will again this year 
\# the occasion for an invasion of our 
campus by a host of high-school seniors. 
Their hope rests on their wits, by means 
f which they are, every one, confident of 
winning a scholarship. 

These student grants-in-aid, totalling 
$5,600, are awarded to those high-school 
seniors in the upper third of their class- 
es who score highest in the tests given 
annually. In addition, contestants will be 
judged upon the recommendations of 
their school principals, as to moral and 
physical qualities, and ability to lead as 
well as co-operate. 

Fourteen scholarships will be offered : 
one full-tuition of $i,ooo; ten for board- 
ing students of $400 each ; and three for 
day students of $200 each. 

Lured by such prizes, students repre- 
senting four neighboring states are ex- 
pected to converge upon Lebanon Valley 
and test their mettle. Candidates for 
Conservatory scholarships will appear on 
Friday, May 7, their tests being more ex- 
tended than the academic examinations. 

Others will arrive Saturday at 8:00, 
when the exams are due to begin, or 
earlier- A carefully detailed program 
has been arranged from that hour con- 
tinuing on into the evening. 

Of this program two major events will 
•* the climactic May Day fete on the 
campus green, and the Albright-Lebanon 
Valley baseball battle. Both will be wit- 
nessed without charge to the examinees. 

Also gratis will be their entertainment. 
Provision is being made for the meals 
and lodging of all those who will require 
the se accommodations. Y. M. C. A. and 

(Continued on Page 4, Column 1) 



E MAUS HIGH BAND 
PLAYS IN CHAPEL 



En Joyabl e Program Presented by 
*A pils of Former Lebanon 
VaI ley Student 



ed b EmaUS High Sch ° o1 Band > direct " 
etit er t • Anthony Jagnesak, presented an 
the c h aming pr °£ ram of band music in 
atn . p ap ^ Program of Friday, April 30, 



Greeting to Our Visitors 

La Vie takes this opportunity to extend for the college a hearty and sin- 
cere welcome to all the visitors who are on the campus this week-end as pro, 
spective students. During your stay here we want you to feel at home and are 
therefore willing both as an institution and as individuals to help you. 

Over this week-end you will be enabled to see the college in actual oper- 
ation, and to examine it at your leisure. This is an opportunity of which we 
advise you to take full advantage, since what you see here may well play an 
important part when you finally make that important decision which is 
summed up in the words, "Which college?" 

The students, in order to help you, will be glad to answer any questious 
you may have in a direct and friendly manner that characterizes the spirit of 
the institution, which, as you may already know, is founded mainly on a tra- 
dition of high scholarship, superior living, and Christian ideals. Therefore, if 
you are the right sort of person, you will have little difficulty in enjoying your 
stay at Lebanon Valley, since you have been selected to take these scholarship 
examinations that you will soon undergo largely on the basis of your previous 
scholastic records. Of course, you have been picked for character too, as well 
as personality. And the degree to which you enter into extra-curricular acti- 
vities has been influential in the decision of the administration to ask you to 
come here today, since Lebanon Valley is not a six-hour or four-day college 
only. Rather, Lebanon Valley is in operation twenty-four hours a day and 
seven days a week; it provides a well rounded program of activities both 
scholastic and non-scholastic from which you may select whatever your inclin- 
ation indicates to help you in acquiring culture and education. 

To see just how this program would be able to help you personally, ali 
the facilities the college affords are being thrown open to your inspection. It 
will be a valuable experience for you to examine them carefully. 

Such an examination, unfortunately, will probably not give you more than 
a vague general notion of the things that go on here in the way of clubs and 
associations which meet for various purposes of an extra-curricular nature 
often at the homes of the professors. You will, however, be able to see one of 
the major extra-curricular functions of the college on Saturday afternoon 
when you witness the presentation of the May Day Pageant, which is a very 
tangible and, we think, rather satisfying result of our efforts, whether dra- 
matic, musical, or esthetic. It's an old L. V. custom we think you'll enjoy. 

Many of you, too, will be interested in the baseball game and the rest of 
the items on the program which has been mapped out for you. Naturally, 
there are sections of that itinerary that you will perhaps be forced to forego, 
but if you can stay for all of it, we feel safe in saying, you will be glad to' 
have done so. 



YALLEYITES TO MEET 
TRADITIONAL RIVALS 

Albright Baseball Team In- 
vades Hostile Territory f 



. 50 o c i ock . Mr. Jagnesak, who grad- 



es! 



/936, is instructor of instrumental 



lory in [ 0Tn . Lebanon Valley Conserva 

tad J the Emaus H 'S h School. The 
althou Jh ° rganized b y him last fall, and 
I'r esent manv of the members of the 
ex Peri e ° rganiZation have had no previous 

Prove/ 06 ' there is little room for im- 
ei ^ent. 

A v *ried 



:se nte ^ , ancl interesting program was 
$eitz - k and ' Marcn Memoria, 



and arr Z ' La Golondrina, by Serradell 
Nw" gCd b y Lake; Van-Guard by 
? 4 m ey W ° rth ; and Gaiety Polka by 
%r ' Wlth a corne t solo by William 
P V m C0 S tituted the first part of the 
ih en Military Escort by Ben- 
S E Sc arranged b y Fillmore into Mfli- 

Se indV" Five Ways was given - 
f^airj UC ! ed the original march, the 
6r ' a ftust" Style of Mascigni's Caval- 

( °on««S a ' in the tempo of the Blue 
on Page 2, Column 1) 



Following the May Day Pageant there 
will be a baseball game between Lebanon 
Valley and Albright at the athletic field- 
Prospective students and others who de- 
sire to witness this contest between two 
traditional rivals can expect to see a 
well-played game between two fine col- 
lege nines. Both colleges are members of 
the Eastern Pennsylvania Collegiate 
League, therefore the intense rivalry will 
have an added impetus. 

The Lebanon Valley team, coached by 
(Continued on Page 3, Cokimn 5) 



Just A Reminder 



Just to remind you that the Junior 
Prom, which will be held at the Her- 
shey Park Ballroom May 14, at 8:00 
o'clock, will be the biggest social 
event of the school year. Paul Tre- 
maine and his orchestra from "Lone- 
ly Acres," who will play for the 
Prom, is the most famous orchestra 
ever to be contracted for a Lebanon 
Valley function. 

"History is made at Tiight" — May 
14. Plan now to attend this, the last 
and largest dance before exams. 
Bring your off-campus friends and 
make this an occasion to be remem- 
bered! 

Get your tickets from any junior, 
and be assured of having a full even- 
ing of enjoyment I 



CRUSADERS DEFEATED 
BY METOXEN'S OUTFIT 

Valley Players Down Susque- 
hanna Nine in Initial Tilt 



The 1937 diamond debut of Chief Me- 
toxen's Flying Dutchmen was very suc- 
cessful. Capitalization of early scoring 
opportunities plus some very effective 
pitching by Paul Billett resulted in a 
6-1 defeat for the Susquehanna nine last 
Wednesday afternoon. L. V. C. took the 
lead as early as the first inning when 
ineffective hurling by Hummel, the Cru- 
saders' starter, combined with some 
heads up base-running netted three runs. 
Danny Seiverling started things going 
by working Hummel for a pass. Capka 
imimediately sacrificed! him to second, 
and Danny proceeded to third when the 
Crusaders' battery department lost the 
ball while Ralph Billett was at bat. Bil- 
lett's clean hit to right then scored the 
L. V. C. shortstop. Hummel hit Kress 
with a pitched ball and committed a wild 
pitch to put runners on second and 
third. Ralph Billett scored when broth- 
er Paul's fly to centerfield was dropped. 
Poloniak drew a pass. Davies' long fly 
to center scored Kress for the third Val- 
ley tally. A pass to Ludwig ended Hum- 
mel's activities for the day. Hauf suc- 
ceeded him and retired Frey on a fly to 
right. 

Hauf was reached for a run in the 
second inning on Seiverling's hit to left, 
a stolen base, a passed ball, and a field- 
er's choice. In the same inning Capka 
was thrown out at the plate by a fine 
(Continued on Page 3, Column 4) 



Staff Holds Banquet 
To Celebrate Annual 

DEDICATED TO STOKES 



Distribution of Quittapahilla 
To Be Made From Library 
on May 15 



Plans Complete For 
May Day Pageantry 

CARNIVAL MOTIF USED 



The annual banquet of the Quittapa- 
hilla staff was held at the Green Ter- 
race, east of Annville, on Wednesday 
evening, May 5. Staff members, profess- 
ors, representatives of the companies 
employed in producing the yearbook, and 
Mr. P. Mark Parthemore, of the J. Hor- 
ace McFarland Company, printers, were 
invited. All were served a delicious din- 
ner. 

Prof. Milton L. Stokes has been hon- 
ored with the dedication of the 1938 
Quittapahilla, it was announced at the 
banquet. 

Distribution of this year's Quiltie will 
be made from the second floor of the 
Carnegie Library on the afternoon of 
Saturday, May 15. Although the work 
of the staff was completed in time to 
permit the year-book to appear on the 
campus on May Day, as the student body 
had desired, it was found that a week's 
delay would be caused by excessive pres- 
sure of production upon various com- 
panies. All of the colleges want their 
annuals to be ready for distribution at 
the same time. 

The toastmaster at the Wednesday- 
night banquet was Boyd Shaffer, busi- 
ness manager of the staff. Curvin Del- 
linger, editor of the 1938 Quittapahilla, 
spoke a few short, informal words. There 
were no long addresses. Also informal 
was the speech of Mr. Parthemore, rep- 
resentative of the McFarland Company, 
of Harrisburg, printers of the book. 

Curvin Dellinger and his staff are to 
be congratulated upon the efficiency they 
have shown and especially upon their 
product itself. Proofs of the annual 
promise from the 1938 Qtcittapahilla 
some "Great Expectations." 

The staff of this year's publication 
was made up of many campus leaders. 
Curvin Dellinger was editor-in-chief ; the 
associate editors were Jean McKeag and 
Louise Stoner. Literary editors were 
Martha Baney, Wanda Price, Theresa 
Stefan, and Calvin Spitler; sport edit- 
ors, Ernestine Jagnesak ancl Roger Say- 
lor; photography editor, Paul Ulrich; 
class statistician, Lucille Maberry; pho- 
tographer, Walter Ehrhnrt; organization 
editor, Lena Risser; typists, Curvin 
Thompson and Lloyd Berger. The busi- 

(Continued on Page 2, Column 3) 



Saturday Will Mark Culmin- 
ation of Extensive Prepar- 
ations 



Congrats May Dayers 

Miss Esther Henderson, director of 
the May Day pageant, wishes to 
thank all participants in the May 
Day program for their splendid co- 
operation in helping L. V. C. to pre- 
sent one of its most original page- 
ants. Everyone has done his part 
cheerfully and this cheerfulness has 
done much toward making May Day 
a desirable and successful endeavor. 
It is regrettable that an attitude of 
non-cooperation was instigated at the 
beginning of practices, but after 
practices were under way ;i fine spir- 
it seemed to predominate which was 
deeply appreciated by those who 
were in charge of the arrangements. 



After the successful rehearsal Mon- 
day afternoon we feel that the May Day 
Carnival on Saturday, May 8, will be 
the finest performance in recent years. 
Miss Henderson and her ambitious corps 
of workers have arranged a program 
which will be a treat for the hundreds of 
spectators who visit the campus annually 
for this colorful pageant. 

Balloons, clowns, peanuts, music, bril- 
liant streamers, an organ grinder with 
his monkey, and a barker to announce 
the dances, all will lend to the gay, fes- 
tive atmosphere. 

Miss Henderson, when interviewed, 
stated that she has never worked with a 
finer group of young people. The co- 
operation has been splendid throughout, 
and men and women alike have worked 
hard to prepare for the Saturday occa- 
sion. 

The women predominate in the dances, 
but the men are outstanding in their 
work of building a new throne and set- 
ting for the queen and her court and in 
putting up the bleachers. Especial thanks 
are due to Mr. Albert Gingrich for the 
splendid job he has made of supervising 
this construction work. 

The Cast 
Coronation Ceremony 

Queen of the May, Lois Harbold ; Maid 
of Honor, Ruth Buck ; Ladies of the 
Court, Grace Naugle, Gayle Mountz, 
Sara Katherine Meckley, Eleanor Lynch, 
Marjorie Smith, Romaine Stiles; Flower 
girls, Betty Black, Frances Jean Shroy- 
er ; Train Bearers, Tonkie Struble, Jim- 
mie Light ; Heralds, Clarence Aungst, 
John Gongloff ; Bearers of the Gifts, 
(Continued on Page 2, Column 4) 



Lebanon Valley College 
Embodies High Ideals 

It was the ideal of members of the 
United Brethren Church to provide an 
education for its young people which 
should exist in a Christian atmosphere 
and where religion should subsist with- 
out sectarianism, This hope was realized 
when Lebanon Valley College was found- 
ed in 1866. Since then, with a first stud- 
ent body of forty-nine, great strides have 
been made not only in increased num- 
bers but in a general feeling of coopera- 
tion between church and school. 

Through the work of our YMCA and 
YWCA a cheery atmosphere makes stran- 
gers feel at home while student and fa- 
culty are brought closer together. Moth- 
er's and Father's days symbolize the 
honor and regard which Lebanon Valley 
students hold for their parents while 
numerous social events unite the stud- 
ents into a large happy family. These 
are all vital elements in a co-educational 
institution whose motto, Libcrlax per 
Veritatum, signifies the ideal conceived 
by its founders and early supporters. 

A variety of activities has spread its 
reputation far and wide- Student talent 
finds expression in various clubs, liter- 
ary societies, dramatic organizations and 
opportunities for journalistic training are 

(Continued on Page 4, Column 4) 



« 



PAGE TWO 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, MAY 6, 1937 



ita Hi* <Mi*0t? tut* 



ESTABLISHED 1925 



A weekly publication by the Undergraduate Students of Lebanon Valley College 

EDITOR-IN CHIEF 

Charles Boyd Shaffer 



EDITORIAL BOARD 
ASSOCIATE EDITOR 

Mary Louise Stoner, '38 

FEATURE EDITOR SPORTS EDITOR 

William F. Clark, '39 Roger B. Saylor, '38 

REPORTORIAL STAFF 



Clifford Barnhart, '38 
Elizabeth Bender, '38 
Sylva Harclerode, '38 
Ernestine Jagnesak, '38 
Wanda Price, '38 
Calvin Spitler, '38 
Theresa Stefan, '38 
Howard Bftier. '39 
Robert Clippinger, '39 
i homas Guinivan, '89 



Clarence Lehman, '39 
Robert Long, "39 
Sarah MacEwen, '39 
Alice Richie, '39 
Samuel Rutter, '39 
Barbara Bowman, '40 
Carl Ehrhart, '40 
Evelyn Evans, '40 
John Ness, '40 
Louise Saylor, '40 



BUSINESS BOARD 
BUSINESS MANAGER CIRCULATION MANAGER 

Curvin N. Dellinger, '38 Ernest Weirick, '39 

ASSISTANT ASSISTANT 

Raymond Smith, '39 Warren Sechrist, '40 



Single Copies 
Subscription . 



5 cents 

. . .$1.00 per year 



Entered at the Annville, Pa., post office as second class matter, under the Act of 

^Publishld weekly through the school period, except during holiday vacation and 
examination week. 



REPRESENTED fOR NATIONAL ADVERTISING »T 

National Advertising Service, Inc. 

Colli it PmbUihtrt R»pr*tr»tativt » 
420 Madibon Ave. New York, N. Y. 

CHICAGO - BOSTON • SAN FRANCISCO 
LOS AN8ELES • PORTLAND BEATTLB 



Vol. XIV 



THURSDAY, MAY 6, 1937 



No. 4 



A Welcome to Our Guests 




In behalf of the administration and faculty of Leb- 
anon Valley College, I wish to extend to the visitors on 
the campus this week-end a most cordial welcome. 

Some of you are alumni, former students, parents, 
and friends who have come to participate in the festi- 
vities of the clay. We are glad that you have come, for 
if you are alumni or former students, we want you to 
keep ia touch with the life of the college .and feel that 
you are a part of it; and if you are parents or friends 
of students, we want you to know us better and under- 
stand more fully what life at Lebanon Valley is. 
Many of you are high school seniors who are here to take part in the 
competitive scholarship examinations. We realize that your short stay here is 
very strenuous, but we hope that after the examinations are over you will 
stay and enjoy the celebration of the day. In this way your day will be a 
symbol of college life, a combination of strenuous work and joyous relaxation 
and fun. Some of you will be successful in your competition and some of you 
will not; we wish it were possible for you all to win. But however that may 
be, we hope you will have a pleasant time on our campus and will desire to 
return in the fall. Lebanon Valley College is just about the right size to pro- 
mote successful work through close contacts with your instructors and pleas- 
ant social life through friendships with your fellow students. 

To all our visitors we wish a very enjoyable time, and if anything more 
can be done for your comfort, or if we can be of service to you in any way, 
do not hesitate to let us know your desires and interests. 

ALVIN H. M. STONECIPHKR, Diw. 



EMAUS HIGH BAND 

PLAYS IN CHAPEL 



(Continued from page 1) 



Danube by Strauss, as a jazz band would 
play it, and finally the version of a band 
on review. 

A feature of the presentation was a 
trombone quartette, composed of Ravel- 
len Weitz, Karl Geisinger, Wilbur Paul- 
es, and Forrest Weidner, which played 
Alleluia, by Palestrina. This was fol- 
lowed by Trombone Toboggan, by Web- 
er, and Salutation, by Seitz. 

Especially well received were Gaiety 
Polka, which was followed by "When 
You and I Were Young, Maggie" as an 
encore, and Military Escort in Five 
Ways. 



May Day Schedule 

8:00 a. m. — Competitive Scholarship 

Examinations in Engle Hall. 
10:00 a. m. — Tennis match: Alumni 
vs. Lebanon Valley. 

2:00 p. — Ye Merrie Carnival. 

',i :.'}(> p. m. — Baseball game: Albright 
vs. I-ebanon Valley. 

7 :00 p. m. — A n n u a 1 Philokosmian 
dinner-dance at the Yorktowne 
Hotel, York, Pennsylvania. 



Old Gradi 



The Week In Review 



A Couple of Good Reasons 



. . . . why the Philo-Clio drama scheduled for Friday night is bound to be good en- 
tertainment. The principal lead of the play will be handled by Kenneth Eastland, 
supported by Grace Naugle. 



Mr. and Mrs. Albert Thomas of Ann 
ville, announce the birth of a daughter on 
Tuesday, April 27. Mrs. Thomas, who 
was the former Delia Herr is of the 
class of '23. 





KENNETH EASTLAND 



GRACE NAUGLE 



lyn Seylar, Margaret Weitner, j? 
Wise, Amy Witmer, Bernice \yj t ?r 
Kathryn Zwally. nier > 

Clowns — Merle Bacastow, John B 
esderfer, William Brensinger, Elw 9 " 1 " 
Brubaker, Howard Baier, James B 
Claude Chapin, William Clark, Ge^f' 
Clymer, Thomas Fox, Robert Gri 
Thomas Guinivan, Dwight Heil a 
Frederick Huber, August Herman, R^' 
ard Moody, Kenneth Morrow, p rem 
Rice, John Schaeffer, Stewart Shap; r 
Warren Sechrist, Robert Tschopp, jjj ' 
ard Wegley, Ernest Weirick, Dal e y 
um, John Ziengst, Allen Zerfoss. 

Hoop Dance — Helen Bartlett, Mild re j 
Haas, Margaret Holbrook, Julia John 
son, Jean Houck, Catherine La 



Pauline Leininger, Anna Louis 
Amy Montieth, Dorothy Null 



wson, 
Light. 



Alice 
erine 



ommittees Selected 
To Direct Sub-freshmen 



PLANS COMPLETE FOR 

MAY DAY PAGENTRY 



About sixty students, including repre- 
sentatives from all the classes, have been 
chosen to act as a committee to guide 
prospective students, especially those tak- 
ing the competitive examination, about 
the campus and from test to test. 

The members of the committee are: 
Ruth Buck, Charles Kinney, Maxine 
Earley, Kenneth Eastland, Martha Faust, 
Lois Harbold, Jean Harnish, Wood row 
Himmelwright, Robert Kell, Theodore 
Loose, Eleanor Lynch, Sara K. Meckley, 
Grace Naugle, Belle Mulhollen, Joseph 
Prowell, Richard Smith, Louis Straub, 
John Trego, Marjorie Smith, Edna Bink- 
ley, and Duey Unger, all of the senior 
class ; 

Elizabeth Bender, Dean Gasteiger, 
Hazel Heminway, Ethel Houtz, Dorothy 
Kreamer, Jean McKeag, Catherine Mills, 
Wanda Price, Lena Risser, Mary Caro- 
lyn Roberts, Roger Saylor, Charles Boyd 
Shaffer, Louise Stoner, Beatrice Zamoj- 
ski, and Mary Zartman of the junior 
class ; 

Helen Bartlett, David Byerly, Thomas 
Guinivan, Carolyn Kohler, Clarence Leh- 
man, Amy Montieth, Alice Richie, Lillian 
Zubroff, Amy Meinhardt, Mildred Gang- 
wer, Jean Marbarger, Robert Smith, and 
Tohn Zettlemoyer of the sophomore 
class ; 

Dean Aungst, William Bender, Carl Y. 
Ehrhart, John Lynch, John Ness, Louise 
Saylor, Harry Criswell, and Richard 
Weagley of the freshman class. 



(Continued from page 1) 



Francis MacMullen, Paul Ulrich, Ray- 
mond Smith, John Moller ; Trumpeters, 
Earl Unger, Cecil Oyler. 
The Carnival — Barker, Louis Straub 

Pirates — Solo dance, Jean McKeag; 
Pirates bold — Mary Albert, Dorothy Bol- 
linger, Jane Clark, Anna Evans, Mar- 
garet Gerry, Ruth Hershey, Minerva 
Hoffman, Lela Lopes, Dorothy Long, Lu- 
cille Oiler, Ruth Ruppersberger, Chris- 
tine Kreider, Verna Mae Schlosser, 
Jeanne Schock, Margaret Weimer, Estfier 
Wise. 

Ball Dancers — Gertrude Ellenberger, 
Audrie Fox, Cora Graby, Mildred Haas, 
Jean Houck, Margaret Holbrook, Paul- 
ine Leininger, Lela Lopes, Edith Metzger, 
Amy Montieth, Nellie Morrison, Ruth 
Rohrer, Alice Richie, Evelyn Strickler, 
Catherine Whister, Lillian Zubroff. 

Western Range — Cow Boys — William 
Bender, Robert Boran, Thomas Bowman, 
James Black, Ira Curry, Robert Dins- 
more, Cecil Hemperly, Paul Horn, Rob- 
ert Lloyd, John Lynch, Paul Myers, 
John Ness, Howard Pefrley, George 
Smee. Cow Girls — Barbara Bowman, Lu- 
cille Gollam, Lela Lopes, Anna May 
Lind, Lucille Oiler, Louise Saylor, Eve- 



Richie, Dorothy Wentling, Kath 
Whister. 

Oriental — Solo Incense dance — Lucille 
Maberry ; Fire Dancers — Geraldine Boy 
er, Grace Geyer, Helen Himmelberger 
M inerva Hoffman, June Krum, 
Marbarger, Amy Meinhardt, Virgi n j a 
Neissner, Anita Patschke, Irene Ranck 
Marianna Treo, Dorothy Yeakel, Kathryn 
Yingst, Dorothy Zeiters. 

Soldiers — Leader, Lucie Cook; Mary 
Albert, Barbara Bowman, Anna Evans 
Anna May Lind, Dorothy Long, Louise 
Saylor, Verna Mae Schlosser, Esther 
Wise Kathryn Zwally. 

Fairies — Jane Eby, Margaret Gerry 
Lucille Gollam, Minerva Hoffman, Lil- 
lian Leisey, Jean Meyer, Evelyn Miller, 
Mary Touchstone, Lillian Vavrous, Ber- 
nice Witmer. 

May Pole Dance — Elizabeth Bender- 
Paul Ulrich, Helen Butterwick - John 
Moyer, Isabel Cox-John Moller, Beatrice 
Fink-Adolph Capka, Esther Flom-John 
Walmer, Nora Franklin-Gustave Maurey, 
Sylva Harclerode-Edgar Messersmith, 
Lucille Hawthorne-Herbert Bowers, Ha- 
zel Heminway - Calvin Spitler, Ethel 
Houtz-Paul Slonaker, Emily Kindt-Er- 
nest Weirick, Caroline Kohler-Joe / Thom- 
as, Dorothy Kreamer- Damon Silvers, 
Ella Mason-Richard Smith, Catherine 
Mills- Vincent Nagle, Lena Risser-Charles 
Belmer, Barbara Sloane-Dean Gasteiger, 
Louise Stoner-Boyd Shaffer, Ethel Wilt- 
Daniel Shearer, Christine Yoder-Robert 
Wert, Beatrice Zamoj ski-Dean Aungst, 
Mary Zartman-Clifford Barnhart. 

Peasants Gay — Ernestine Jagnesak. 
Agnes Morris, Greta Heiland, Maxine 
Earley, Gail Spangler, Evelyn Fridinger, 
Evelyn Evans, Betty Tierney, Mary 
Catroneo, Lucille Shaw. 



Linen Bazaar 



The Delphian Society held a linen ba- 
zaar in Delphian Hall Thursday after- 
noon, April 29. There was a novel se- 
lection of gayly-colored linen prints, 
luncheon sets and handkerchiefs. The ba- 
zaar was well attended by faculty mem- 
bers and their wives, besides by the girls 
of the dormitories. Delphian wishes to 
thank everyone who helped to promote 
the bazaar and make it a success. 



STAFF HOLDS BANQUET 

TO CELEBRATE ANNUAL 



(Continued from pag* 1) 



ness manager was Boyd Shaffer; the 
associate business managers were Cath- 
erine Mills, AdMph Capka, David Byer- 
ly, and Dean ( nsteiger. 

Professors present at the banquet 
were Dr. George G. Si ruble, Prof. D. 

(lark Carmean, and Prof. Milton L 
Stokes. 




"Did you write home this week?" 

"No, I telephone every Sunday at 
the reduced Long Distance rates." 

• You can get home and back m 
a jiffy by telephone. Low rates 
are in effect ALL DAY SUNDW 
and after seven every nigh*- 

THE BELL TELEPHONE COMPANY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



Si 



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I 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, MAY 6, 1937 



PAGE THREE 



tier 

am. 

ood 
ard, 
raid 
nm, 
and, 
ich. 
man 
>iro, 
ich- 

ired 
An- 
'son, 
'ght, 
Uie e 
:rine 

icille 
Boy. 
fger, 
Jean 
=inia 
inck, 
hryn 

klary 
rans, 
)uise 
sther 

erry, 
Lil- 
iller, 
Ber- 

lder- 
John 
itrice 
John 
urey, 
mith, 
Ha- 
Ethel 
t-Er- 
hom- 
lvers, 
lerine 
larles 
eiger, 
Wilt- 
.obert 
jngst, 

lesak, 
axine 
inger, 
Mary 



Sports 



Features 



gports Shots 

that the baseball team has played 
games, several glaring weaknesses 
t*° corne forth even though they were 
^ected before the first game. The first 

s fh t P aul Billett is a mi s nt y fine Pitch- 

15 'when nobody is on base, but once a 
er ' reaches first it is almost as good as 
111211 An analysis shows that in every 
S -a in which a man reached first, one 
"""more runs wcre scored against Bil- 
° r and all of them go into the records 
'^earned runs even if a mental lapse al- 
35 e d one of them. A total of only two 
l0ft have been left on bases while the 
""f blonde has been hurling. That wind- 
W Tuesday while Witman stole home 
las inexcusable. 

# » # 

The other great weakness is 
the lack of hitting power. In two 
games the team batting average 
° s .153, a sad one to say the 
least. The outfielders have con- 
tributed just one hit to the cause 
in two games, that being Chris 
Walk's wasted single in the ninth 
inning of the Susquehanna en- 
counter. The only regular who 
has not fanned at least once in 
two games is Ralph Billett. Gor- 
don Davies leads with whiffers 
with four in six trips to the 
plate. Unless the batting situa- 
tion is remedied, Chief Metox- 
en's teams will have some tough 
afternoons ahead this spring. 

* • • 

One great consolation is the fine field- 
ing exhibited by all the performers. Two 
errors in two games is a fine record in 
college competition. What is more those 
two errors came long after the Gettys- 
burg game had been lost so that the 
only result was that the final score was 
8-0 instead of 6-0. Four out of the five 
hits made by our opponents would be 
hits in any man's league and the other 
one would have been tough even for a 
Lou Gehrig or a Bill Terry to gather in. 
Even if the outfielders have been hitless 
wonders, they have been doing well when 
put out to pasture. Not one of them has 
dropped a fly yet. 

• * # 

The Ursinus game will show if 
we have more than one pitcher in 
school or if we have one pitch- 
er and several throwers. Marsh- 
all Frey is expected to demons- 
trate his wares against the vis- 
itors from Collegeville. If Frey 
does not last, our transfer from 
Ursinus, Bill Scherfel, may have 
a chance to show his old pals 
n ow this game of baseball is 
Played. 

• • • 

Gibble, Palmyra's contribution to L. V. 
C ' baseball, received his baptism under 
fire against Gettysburg. Once he settled 
J° w «i, he really showed something. Un- 
0rt unately two weak rollers were 
t0s sed away by Capka, thereby causing 

'bble extra trouble. When he saw his 
Animates did not offer him much sup- 
Port > he took matters into his own hands 
retired the side by fanning O'Neil 
Witman, the batting hero of the day 

° m the Gettysburg point of view. 



s essi 



casual visitor to a practice 



°n might wonder just who 
the boss, Chief Metoxen or 
Kress. For some unknown 
° n the catcher seems to 



r «a s 
think 
s *in 



he is entitled to extra 
lgs in batting practice. 
i e g CSS ' " Iat herly" advice to rook- 
^ ls really rather amusing. One 
q ^ think he was a Mickey 

itist htane ° r 3 Gabby Hartnett 
j. ea d of j ust plain Kress from 
,ne rsvill c . 



VALLEY NINE DOWNED 
BY GETTYSBURG TEAM 

Local Boys Lose To Strong 
Opponents in Tough Con- 
test 



Woefully ftehle hatting proved the 
downfall for Chief Metoxen's diamond 
tossers in their first League game of the 
season. John Deardorff and Turk Eeker, 
right-handed moundsmen of the Gettys- 
burg team, limited the Blue and White 
to two measly hits in recording an 8-0 
triumph. Paul Billett, the losing pitcher, 
lost control several times, allowing the 
Bullets to assume a 4-0 lead before he 
gave way to dibble in the ninth. Walks 
and fielding lapses resulted in four more 
runs off Billett' s successor. 

Mizell opened the game with a scratch 
hit past first. He was forced by Wor- 
ley, P. Billet to R. Billett. Then Wit- 
man Lashed a mighty triple to center, 
Worley scoring for the initial tally. A 
record run was registered in the fourth 
when Witman walked, took second on a 
passed ball, reached third on a fielder's 
choice, and stole home as Billett pro- 
ceeded to take a mighty windup. For the 
next three innings the Bullets failed to 
get the ball out of the infield. To open 
the eighth, however, Ecker drew a pass, 
was sacrificed to second, and reached 
third on a passed ball. In the meantime 
O'Neil had worked Billett for a walk 
and stole second unmolested. Once again 
Witman proved the man of the hour by 
scoring both on a clean hit down the 
right field foul line. Gibble replaced the 
tiring Billett in the ninth and was 
touched for four runs on two errors, 
three passes, and a hit by Yev,ak. 

All this time the Valley batters par 
aded up to the plate and paraded back 
to the bench. In fact, only five men 
reached first, two on walks, one on an 
error, and Capka and Kress on hits. The 
one real scoring opportunity came in 
the fifth. Ralph Billett was safe when 
Raymond imiscued. Kress worked Ecker 
for a pass. Paul Billett .advanced them 
while being tossed out by Superka. All 
went for naught however as Poloniak 
was called out on strikes and Walk went 
out to the first baseman. A total of ten 
L. V. C. hatters whipped, four while 
Deardorff was hurling and six after Eck 
er relieved him. Billett fanned nine and 
Gibble two. 

The box scor«: 

GETTYSBURG 

AB R H PO A E 

Mizell, 2B 4 10 10 

O'Neil, C 4 10 9 10 

Worley, LF 4 1 2 

Witman, IB 4 1 2 11 

Superka, SS 2 10 14 

Yevak, CF 4 1110 

Yunaska, RF 2 10 10 

Raymond, 3B 4 1 1 1 

Deardorff, P 2 1 1 

Ecker, P 1 2 



After having four consecutive matches 
rained out, the Lebanon Valley tennis 
earn finally did get into action against 
Bucknell at Lewisburg last Thursday. 
The home team proved far too strong for 
the visiting netsters by administering an 
S-i defeat. The lone L. V. C. victory was 
turned in by the doubles team of Don- 
moyer and Shenk. In the singles matches 
only Stewie Shapiro, playing number 
two, succeeded in winning a set, but Mc- 
Call completely outclassed him in the last 
two sets to win. Even though none of 
the Blue and White racqueteers had 
played for eight days preceding in match, 
all six readily admitted they were beaten 
by a better team, however all felt they 
could have made a better showing if they 
had been able to practice. The Bucknell 
team has yet to taste defeat this season- 
The scores : 

Singles 

Dunham, Bucknell defeated Donmoyer, 

L. V. G— 6-3 ; 6-4. 
McCall, Bucknell defeated Shapiro, L. V. 

C. — 4-6; 6-2; 6-2. 
S. Nesbit, Bucknell defeated Shenk, L. 

V. C— 6-4; 6-4. 
Thomas, Bucknell defeated Umberger, L. 

V. C— 6-i ; 6-0. 
Nesbit, Bucknell defeated Snell, L. V. C. 

— 6-o; 6-i ; 
McDonald, Bucknell defeated Saylor, 
L. V. G— 6-i ; 6-4. 

Doubles 

Donmoyer and Shenk, L. V. C. defeated 
Dunham and S. Nesbit, Bucknell — 6-2 ; 
6-3- 

McCall and Thomas, Bucknell defeated 
Umberger and Shapiro, L. V. C- — 6-3 ; 
6-3- 

Nesbit and Campo, Bucknell defeated 
Snell and Saylor, L. V. C. — 6-2; 6-4. 



31 8 4 27 8 

LEBANON VALLEY 

AB R HPO A B 

Seiverling, SS 4 1 

Capka, 3B 4 112 2 

a. milett, 2B 4 4 

Kress, C 3 1 11 2 

P. Billett, P 3 2 3 

Gibble, P 

Poloniak, IB 3 4 2 

3 2 

3 1 1 

2 1 



Walk, CF ... 
Davies, BF 
Frey, LF 



29 2 27 10 2 



Score by innings. 

Gettysburg 100 100 024-8 

Lebanon Valley 000 000 000-0 



Tennis at Bucknell 



CRUSADERS DEFEATED 

BY METOXEN'S OUTFIT 



(Continued from page 1) 



throw from Badger, Susquehanna's cen- 
terlielder, who had caught Kress' fly. 
After that Hauf was very effective ex- 
cept in the fifth inning when hits by U. 
BiHett, P. Billett and Poloniak were 
good for two more markers. 

All this time Paul Billett was mowing 
down the visiting batsmen with mono- 
tonous regularity. In fact, for eight inn- 
ings nobody reached first safely. With 
only three batters to be retired for a 
perfect game, the strain proved too 
great and Miller, pinch-hitting for Fred- 
ericks, opened the ninth with a cle*ui 
single to center. He stole second while 
Billett was fanning Hauf. Wert then 
grounded to short. Seiverling fell as he 
went for the ball, but did succeed in get- 
ting the ball to first where Poloniak had 
to stretch to retire the baiter. For some 
unexplicable reason Poloniak held his 
pose there while Miller galloped around 
to the plate for a score, thereby spoil- 
ing Billett's shut-out. The game ended 
as Alexander became Biliett's fifteenth 
strike-out victim of the afternoon. The 
box score: 

SUSQUEHANNA 

AB. R HPO A E 

Alexander, LF 4 

Cotton, SS 2 1 

Kaltreider, SS 1 1 

Spitzner, RF 3 1 

Badger, CF 3 2 1 1 

Hazlett, 2B 3 1 2 

Bollinger, 3B 3 4 

Fredericks, IB 2 12 

A. Miller 1110 

Hummel, P 1 1 

Hauf, P 3 1 

Keil, C 1 7 



VALLEYITES TO MEET 

TRADITIONAL RIVALS 



(Continued from page 1) 



Chief Emerson Metoxen, is noted for 
its fine defensive qualities. It has a pitch- 
er who has turned in numerous master- 
pieces the past three seasons. Behind him 
is one of the finest infields in small col- 
lege baseball circles. All four of these 
men cover plenty of ground, gather in 
almost everything they can reach, and 
make fast, accurate pegs to the proper 
place. Fast, peppy baseball is always in 
evidence when the infield is functioning. 

Even though nobody claims that Chief 
Metoxen's team is a powerhouse on the 
offense, there are several line hitters who 
manage to drag their weaker teammates 
along. Daring, heads-up base running 
makes the team very dangerous in spite 
of the lack of hitting power. 



Wert, C 2 1 1 



28 1 1 24 12 2 
LEBANON VALLEY 

AB R HPO A E 

Seiverling, SS 3 2 1110 

Capka, 3B 3 2 1 

R. Billett, 2B 4 1 2 3 

Kress, C 3 2 14 1 

P. Billett, P 4 1 2 

Poloniak, IB 2 1 7 

Davies, RF 3 

Moller, RF 1 

Ludwig, LF 1 

Walk, LF 2 110 

Frey, CF 2 1 

Artz, CF 10 10 

Brown, CF 1 

30 6 7 27 5 

Susquehanna 000 000 001—1 

Lebanon Valley 310 020 00...— 6 




WHAT IN THE 
WORLD IS THAT 
THINS. JUDGE ? 
DON'T TELL ^ 
ME IT'S A j 
PIPE 



YEP — EVEN IF IT 
DOES LOOK LlkE A 
SHIP MODEL. IT 
COMES FROM THE 
NORTHWESTERN 
COAST OF AMERICA. 
INDIAN. OF COURSE - 

ST 



YOU SEE, THE INDIANS USED 
MANY OBJECTS AS PATTERNS 
FOR THEIR PIPES — THIS 
PIPE WAS CARVED BY SOME 
INDIAN NMHO WAS HIGHLY 
IMPRESSED BY A STEAMBOAT 



SOME PIPE, JUDGE, BUT ITS V/ELL. 
CERTAINLY NOT BUILT TO TOTE OPINIONS 
AROUND IN YOUR POCKET ON PIPES 

LIKE THIS BRIAR OF MINE J> MAY 
AND THIS BIG RED PRINCE Jf DIFFER — 
ALBERT TIN, IS IT 9 




Copyright, 1937, R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Company 



OUR OFFBfi 



/KEN.' TRY THE FAMOUS 
AROMA— THE COOL, 
SMOOTH SMOKING — 
THAT MAKE PRINCE 
ALBERT THE WORLD'S 
MOST POPULAR 
TOBACCO.' 



PRINCE ALBERT MONEY- 
BACK GUARANTEE 

Smoke 20 fragrant pipefuls of 
Prince Albert. If you don't find 
it the mellowest, tastiest pipe 
tobacco you ever smoked, re- 
turn the pocket tin with the rest 
of the tobacco in it to us at any 
time within a month from this 
date, and we will refund full 
purchase price, plus postage. 

(Signed) R. J. Reynolds 
Tobacco Company, Winston- 
Salem, North Carolina. 



50 



pipefuls of fragrant 
tobacco in every 2-oz. 
tin of Prince Albert. 




Fringe Albert 




PAGE FOUR 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, MAY 6, 1937 



ANNUAL EXAMINATIONS 

TO BE HELD MAY DAY 



(Continued from page i) 



Y. W. C. A. members will assist in guid- 
ing the guests to their appointments, and 
in supplying any information needed. 

To qualify for the exams and the day's 
activities, contestants must have sent ap- 
plication by Tuesday May 4- President 
Clyde A. Lynch emphasized. Most of 
the forms, however, were submitted 
earlier. On Monday afternoon the Presi- 
dent's office reported that registrations 
had been received. They were from the 
following : — 

Mary Jane Anderson, John Harris ; 
Francis Baldauski, Wyoming High ; 
Charles Beittel, William Penn ; 
Richard Bell, Lower Paxton; 
Richard Biery, Progress; 
Eleanor Blecher, Annville; 
Alma Bomberger, Palmyra; 
Edith Borock, Lebanon ; 
Ruth Broadway, Carney's Point, N. J. ; 
Albert Braymen, Marietta; 
Robert Breen, Lebanon; 
David Buchanon, Mangansville, Md. ; 
Erbert D'Anton, Newark, N. J.; 
Jane Davis, Glenolden; 
Lloyd DeaVen, Jonestown; 
Samuel Derick, Harrisburg ; 
Mary Dotter, Annville; 
Dorthea Donough, Lebanon; 
Harry Drendall, Mountain Top ; 
Eugene Edmunds, Shamokin ; 
Jane Ehrhart, Lancaster ; 
Harvey Eldredge, Atlantic Highlands, 
N. J. 

Charles Eroh, West Hazleton; 

Harvey Faust, Windber ; 

Robert Fabian, Trenton, N. J. 

Wilmer Gingrich, Annville ; 

Lily Gonder, Lititz ; 

Samuel Grimm, Jr., Annville; 

Paul Humanick, Reinerton ; 

Lucille Herr, Lebanon ; 

Raymond Hess, Jonestown; 

Naomi Himes, Newport ; 

Martin Hoffman, Lebanon ; 

John Keyser, Harrisburg ; 

Martha Koontz, Baltimore, Md-, 

James Kuhns, Greensburg ; 

Mildred Layser, Richland ; 

Myrtle Leff, Atlantic Highlands, N. J. 

Elaine Leff, Atlantic Highlands, N. J. 

Mary McGinnis, Red Lion ; 

Charles Miller, York; 

Velma Witman, Downingtown ; 

Genevieve Morgan, Harrisburg ; 

Eleanor Ney, Schuylkill Haven ; 

Ernestine Oiler, Waynesboro ; 

Paul Parnell, Mt. Carmel ; 

Francis Prutzmann, Lancaster ; 

Ralph Rapp, Lebanon ; 

John Rauhauser, York ; 

Elwood Reber, West Lawn ; 

Marion Louise Reiff, New Cumberland ; 

John William Rothrock, Bangor; 

Wallace Middagh Ruth, Bangor; 

Betty Anne Rutherford, Lebanon; 

Edna Rutherford, Bainbridge ; 

Harold Saidt, Trenton, N. J.; 

Doris Schwartz, York; 

Marion Schweigert, Schuylkill Haven; 

Ruth Shay, Progress; 

Jesse Shenk, Annville; 

Stauffer Smith, Annville; 

Marion Stewart, Pleasanville, N. J. 

Aleta Stiles, Red Lion ; 

Paul Stauffer, Jr., New Cumberland; 

Jean Strickhauser, York New Salem ; 

Winfield Taylor, Red Lion ; 

Blanche Wagner, Schuylkill Haven ; 

Elvin Walters, Jonestown; 

Evelyn Ware, Harrisburg; 

Florence Webster, Oberlin ; 

Mordecai Welling, Sykesville ; 

Oscar Will, Sykesville ; 

Virginia Wirt, Harrisburg; 

Margaret Boyd, Manheim ; 

Kenneth Deardorf, York ; 

Jean McAllister, Harrisburg; 

Esther Rhinehart, York; 



ARCHY 
AND 
METHITABEL 



WITH APOLOGIES 

TO DON MARQUIS 



THANKS MEHITABEL FOR YOUR 

LETTER IT 
SETTLED A LOT OF PROBLEMS 

AND I 

GUESS NO ONE WILL EVER 
LAUGH AT ME 

AGAIN BECAUSE I AM JUST 
ARCHY THE 

COCKROACH YOUR LETTER FIX- 
ED THAT 

UP ALL RIGHT 

1 HAVE SHOWN IT TO SEVERAL 
OF THE 

BOYS AND THEY ARE CALLING 
ME THE 

CASANOVA OF COCKROACH DOM 1 

DIDNT 
THINK YOUD MIND 

YOU MAY NOTICE TOO THAT 1 
HAVE BEEN 

PROMOTED ARCHY IS NO LONG- 
ER THE 

LOWER CASE COCKROACH 

THEY HAVE GIVEN ME A TYPE- 
WRITER 

WITH ALL CAPITAL LETTERS 
NOT 

THAT IM BOASTING BUT CAPI- 
TAL 
LETTERS GEE 

i 

INCIDENTALLY MEHITABEL 1 
HAVE MET A 

NEW FRIEND WHO CAME OVER 
TO THE SCHOOL 

FROM A MAN NAMED DR MOR- 
GAN IN A 

SATCHEL OF MEDICINAL INSTRU- 
MENTS 

THIS FRIEND SAYS TO WARN 
YOU NOT TO 

BE SURPRISED IF THE DOCTOR 
RUSHES IN 

AND MiEAKS UP THE PERFORM- 
ANCE OF 

THREE CORNERED MOON TOMOR- 
ROW NIGHT 

BY DEMANDING HIS TOOLS 

I ASKED HIM WHY AND HE 
WOULD ONLY 

SAY HE MIGHT NEED THEM HE 
WOULDN T 

SAY WHY 

THEY ARE HOWEVER OBSTETRI- 
CAL GADGETS 

THIS NEW FRIEND OF MINE 

SEEMS TO 
KNOW EVERYTHING I REALLY* 

CANT 
SEE HOW HE DOES IT 
FOR INSTANCE HE ASSURES ME 

THAT 

THERE IS ACTUALLY ON THE 

CAMPUS A 
MUSIC PROF WHOSE NAME IS 

NOT 

UNCONNECTED WITH SOUP WHO 
WEARS 

SHORTS ADORNED BY SO HELP 

ME 
WHAT 

YES MEHITABEL 

WHAT IS THE WORLD COMING TO 

IT IS COMING TO A HELUVA PASS 
A MAN IN THE DAY STUDENT 
ROOM 

TOLD ME THE OTHER DAY WHEN 
THE 

ONLY WAY I CAN GET ANY MON- 
EY OUT 

OF THOSE CANDY MACHINES OF 
MINE 

IS TO FIX THEM SO THE STU- 
DENTS 
CAN T TURN THEM 
UP SIDE DOWN 



FROM CAMPUS PENS 



PENSIVE 
When I am worn with living 
Or you have made nie sad, 
When I am blind with seeing 
The sights that make men mad, 
1 bathe my eyes in starlight 
And cool them in the dew, 
And dawn and I discover 

That every day is new. 

* * # 

WE DID NOT GUESS 
When first we loved we did not guess 
That it would bring unhappiness, 
Or tear our souls like roses' thorns. 
When first we loved we did not guess 
That from it all this grief was born, 
This anguish feed our hearts. 
When first we loved we did not guess. 

* * # 

SEHNSUCHT 
1 am weary of people and things, 
Of always doing and going, 
Of saying things empty or vain, 
Of knowing things not worth the knowing. 

I long for the warm summer sun, 
For life that is simple and true, 
For the tall, green pines on the mountain 
Where I loved and was loved by you. 

* * # 

LIFE 

Life is a dream from which I never wak- 
en; 

It holds nie fast, and yet it sets me free. 
Cool grass, pale buds new-greening, 

white clouds shaken 
On an April day — These are enough to 

bring me ecstasy. 

Earth-rooted as 1 am, world-bound, 
I shall not flee life's mead of pain and 
scars, 

But though the way I "go should bruise 
my feet 

I shall look up, and brush against the 
stars. 



PEGGY'S BEAUTY 
SHOP 

Special on Frederick Permanent 
Waves 

$4.00 $6.00 

2 blocks West on Sheridan Avenue 



Summer Positions for Students 
EARN 



• You can use your 
educational training 



$40 to $75 i'" 11 earn ext ™, money 

^ this summer. I his un- 
A WFFIC USU{ d opportunity for 
educational extension 
work in the home is 



extremely interesting. Many students 
have been exceptionally successful arid 
have found it the solution to their 
financial problem. Write for full de- 
tails and proof of results at once. 

The John C. Winston Co.. Home Exten- 
sion Dept., 1012 Arch St., Phila,, Pa. 



Compliments of 

A. & P. STORE 

C. H. SHEARER, Mgr. 



ASTOR THEATRE 

Annville 



Wed. and Thurs. — May 5-6 
"MAID OF SALEM" 

with CLAUDETTE COLBERT 

Fri. and Sat. — May 7-8 
"THE GREAT O'MALLEY" 

with PAT O'BRIEN 

Mon. and Tues. — May 10-11 
"DEVIL'S PLAYGROUND" 

with RICHARD DIX 

Wed. and Thurs.— May 12-13 
"WOMEN OF GLAMOUR" 

with VIRGINIA BRUt /■ 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

EMBODIES HIGH IDEALS 



(Continued from pag$ 1) 



afforded by the weekly periodical, La 
Vie Collegiemie, and the annual year 
book published by the Junior Class, The 
Quittapahilla. In addition to these, athle- 
tics with its pep meetings show the spir- 
it of good sportsmanship which is al- 
ways present. Discipline is effectively 
maintained by student-government organ- 
izations. 

Under the energetic guidance of her 
president, Dr. Clyde A. Lynch, she looks 
back upon a proud history where presi- 
dents Thomas Rees Vickory, Dr. E. Ben- 
jamin Bierman, Dr. Roop, and George 
Daniel Gossard all contributed to the up- 
building of the college which made her 
permanency sound. The faculty includes 
men and women of the highest moral 
character who represent definite success- 
es in their field. This contributes greatly 
to the respected position that scholar- 
ship maintains on the campus. 



Registered Puppies 

ESKIMO and SCHIPPERKES 

A. T. BRIGHTON 

35 East Main St., ANNVILLE, PA. 



For School Supplies and 
Books of all Kinds Go To: 

BOLLMAN'S 

628 Cumberland Street 
LEBANON, PA. 



RENU SHOP 

One Day Service 
Dry Cleaning, Pressing, Repairing 
11 E. Main St. ANNVILLE. PA. 



GRADUATION GIFTS 

Nothing liner than a good book 

Esbenshade's Book Store 

38 N. Eighth St., LEBANON, PA. 



I. H. ROEMIG 

BILLIARDS and BOWLING 

(Bowl for your health) 
ANNVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA 



The GREEN TERRACE 

DINING ROOM 

and 

GRILL 

Full Course Dinners 
from 85c 



Men's New Spring Neckwg^ 
Polo Shirts ar 
Men's, Women's and Chil(j r 

White Oxfords ^ 

JOHN HIRSH 

WAGNER and SHAUD, M^, 



PHIL0S 

Be at your best. Have 
Haircut and Shampoo f ( 
the anniversary. 



Karl's Shop 



D.L.SAYL0R& 
SONS 

Contractors 
Lumber and Coal 

ANNVILLE, PENNA. 



KREAMER BROS. 

Furniture 
Floor Coverings 
Electric Refrigerators 
Hoover Electric Sweepers 
Electric Washing Machines 

RCA Radios 
FUNERAL DIRECTORS 
Phone 144 ANNVILLE, PA. 



Meals Served Daily 

Best Sundaes in Town with 
Home Made Ice Cream 
Sandwiches, Cigarettes, Candy 

C. D. BRUNNER 

E. Main St. ANNVILLE, PA. 



DI NUNZI0 
SHOE SHOP 

"Our Motto is to Please" 
A Trial Will Convince You 
9 E. Main St., ANNVILLE, PA. 



Complete Your Food 
Supply For That Midnight 
Lunch By Stopping At 

FINK'S BAKERY 

We sell all types of baked prod** 
at all hours. 




'Start the day 

In the Modern way. 



Breakfast at the Pennway 



THE PENNWAY H0TEI 



fed 



! Q in totheProm? 




\tw\\twmt 



! 




Yeah, are you-. 



L 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 




ANNVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA, THURSDAY, MAY 13, 1937 



No. 5 



fschopp Topnotch In 
Three-Cornered Moon 

PRAISE TO SEIVERLING 

§tag e Technicians Deserw 
Credit for Original ana Re- 
alistic Setting 

By William F. Clark 

The philo-Clio presentation of Ger- 
\ Tonkonogy's delightful, though 
^ous Three-Cornered Moon, we are 
'ted to admit, amused us ; yet we find 
'° rs elves unable to call it good theatre, 
!" r its effects were achieved in major 
°rt through a direct violation rather 
J an a n adherence to the principles of 
artistic dramaturgy. 

In saying this, we do not wish to seem 
t0 issue a blanket condemnation, for 
(here were times when the activities of 
the most incompetent actors in the piece 
amused us. And whenever Robert 
Ischopp so much as protruded his head 
upon the scene we convulsed quite un- 
restrainedly in the aisles with the rest 
of the proletariat. Unfortunately, 
though, the exigencies of dramatic con- 
struction would not permit him to oc- 
cupy the stage for more than a portion 
of the time, so that the rest of the play 
seemed to us a dreary process of waiting 
for his reappearance. This made for a 
situation of which not even the charming 
i madness of the screwy Rimpelgars could 
I relieve the tedium, since that madness 
was badly obscured behind vast clouds 
of clumsy, incompetent acting that muffed 
repeatedly lines we should have thought 
no one could fail in. This, however, is 
not to say that the piece was without its 
difficulties. But confronted with a wreck- 
age of easier parts that defiies over-state- 
ment, we shall make no attempt to com- 
m ent concerning those moments that re- 
quired a highly delicate finesse. 
To get down to particulars, what we 
mean is this : as to the acting, there was 
D °ie, save that of Mr. Tschopp for whose 
'"satile talents the vehicle in question 
^vided merely another triumph. Danny 
(Page 6, Column i) 



FRIDAY AT 8:30 



CHOIR TO PRESENT 
SEVERAL CONCERTS 



Toni 6ht in the Hershey Community 
,eatre i a combined chorus of approxi- 
y tw o hundred fifty voices will pre- 
P Handel's "Messiah." Choirs par- 
ing are the First Methodist Epis- 
J choir of Lancaster, the Trinity 

^ a eran Ch ° ir ° f Lancaster > ^ Market 
fee p e ^sbyterian choir of Harrisburg, 
r arljsl lrst Methodist Episcopal choir of 
and tn e Lebanon Valley College 

5* 



cl ub. Th 



e Community Chorus of 



5 nev i ' 

Thi sponsoring the production. 



th, 



ev ent has become an annual one 



, Se choirs. Last year Dr. William' 
Qioi rs e dir ector of the Westminster 
H n °°1> was present to conduct sev- 
\ l. ers - An attempt was made to 
15 Hot c m present again this year, but it 
Sd er T tain whe ther he will be able to 

P« of that event ' Dn Harry ' A ' 
1 S ^ th hC Hershe y Community Chor- 
^c ast he Trinity Lutheran Choir of 
Cr will conduct. 

( p «9e 6, Column 4) 



Diplomats Administer 

Second Court Defeat 



In an extremely close match the 
Franklin and Marshall net team sent Leb- 
anon Valley to its second defeat of the 
season by a 5-4 count. The Diplomats 
jumped to the fore by capturing four of 
the six singles matches. "Stewie" Shapiro 
and Clair Snell were the only L. V. C. 
men to come out on top. The match was 
clinched when Schleeger and Hughes 
overpowered Shapiro and Snell in the 
first doubles match to be completed. Al- 
though the Blue and White rallied to 
win the last two doubles matches, the 
only result was to tighten up the score. 

The match, as a whole, was probably 
the most interesting of the season to the 
spectators mainly because of the antics 
of Vinnie Beals, East Orange, N. J., num- 
ber four man on the F. and M. team. 
Beals repeatedly gave vent to his feelings 
and took some gentle razzing in a very 
good-natured fashion. In one instance in 
the doubles match Beals managed to 
maneuver himself right in front of his 
partner while the latter was making a 
shot. The result was that Beals was hit 
by the ball. 

GOING TO THE PROM? 



Drexel Tech, Juniata 
Defeated in Tennis 



Captain Donmoyer Leads Val- 
ley Team to Two Victories 
In Past Week 



Last week Captain Donmoyer's tennis 
team scored two decisive victories on the 
Annville courts. Thursday the racquet 
wielders from Drexel Tech were repulsed 
6-3 and Friday Juniata was set back for 
the second time in four days, this time by 
an 8-1 count. These were the third and 
fourth matches captured by the Flying 
Dutchmen this season. 

Against Drexel Donmoyer, Shapiro, 
?«id Snell won with comparative ease ; 
Shenk won after dropping a set; and 
Umberger and Evelev fell before their 
opponents from Philadelphia. In the 
doubles matches Donmoyer and Shenk 
came through with flying colors ; Shapiro 
and Snell rallied to win after dropping 
the second set; and the Umberger- 
Evelev combination proved rather easy 
for Snyder and Reese, losing 6-2 ; 6-3. 

Against the Juniata Indians, the Blue 
and White netsters won by an even more 
impressive margin, 8-1. Donmoyer, play- 
ing number one, completely overpowered 
Sieber, winning twelve straight games. 
While none of the other seven triumphs 
were recorded with such extraordinary 
(Page 5, Column 3) 

HEAR PAUL TREMA1NE 



Journalists Attend 
La Vie Staff Banquet 

JOHN SCHROPP SPEAKS 



MEN'S SENATE HOLDS 
AN NUAL EL ECTIONS 

NEW INTEREST IN CAMPUS POLITICS 



Baus Toastmaster For the Oc- 
casion; Dr. Light and Shaf- 
fer Also Speak 



The retiring and incoming staffs of Lo 
Vie Collegienne held their annual spring 
banquet at the Green Terrace last night. 
Approximately forty aspiring journalists 
together with their faculty advisers met 
in front of the Administration building 
shortly after 6 145 o'clock and motored to 
the scene of the festivities. 

When the delicious dinner, which feat- 
ured sirloin steak with mush rooms, had 
been consumed, students, advisers, and 
guests turned their attention to less gusta- 
tory matters. 

Richard Baus, as toastmaster, broke 
away from the traditional style and omit- 
ted the customary humorous stories, 
thereby disappointing his many friends 
who well know his subtle humor. Mr. 
Baus, who had charge of all arrange- 
ments for the banqquet, was the success- 
ful editor of La Vie during the past 
year, and co-editor of the handy and use- 
ful style book which, a few weeks ago, 
was distributed to the members of the 
new staff. 

Dr. V. Earl Light was called on for a 
few remarks, and then the speaker of 
the evening, Mr. John K. R. Schropp, 
was introduced. Mr. Schropp, who is the 
former-Mayor of Lebanon and also the 
business manager of the Lebanon Daily 
Nezvs, gave an address which was both 
informational and entertaining. 

Faculty members who attended the ban- 
quet were Dr. V. Earl Light, Chairman 
of the Faculty committee, Dr. P. A. W. 
Wallace, Dr. G. S. Struble, and Prof. M. 
L. Stokes. 

HEAR PAUL TREMAINE 



"L" Club Sponsors Movies 



The Varsity "L" Club showed signs 
of activity this week when it launched 
a very successful ticket sale in coop- 
eration with the management of the 
Astor Theater. Movie enthusiasts 
were rounded up very effectively and 
a good show was promised by Com- 
mittee Chairman, John Speg. 

Richard Dix and Dolores Del Rio 
starred in 'The Devil's Playground" 
Monday and Tuesday, while Virginia 
Bruce and Mel'vyn Douglas reflected 
from "Women of Glamour" Wednes- 
day and Thursday. Receipts from 
this sale will be used for the purchase 
of new sweaters for club members. 



Rain Routs Royal Revelers 



An unlisted participant appeared in 
the midst of the May frolic ca Saturday 
afternoon, and took off his role in a 
grand, not to say devastating, style. It 
was none other than Jupiter Pluvius, his 
majesty of the moist mien. Mr. Pluvius, 
it seems, has something of a reputation 
for just such abrupt interpositions as 
the one on Saturday. He has gracefully 
showered coronations, state funerals, 
battles, parades, and ball games with his 
dripping exudations of regal charm. 

His favorite trick, as once again illus- 
trated, is to descend suddenly, literally 



out of a blue sky, and to take complete 
charge of affairs. Often his descent is 
so sudden, copious, and thrilli:^ that 
all present find themselves drenched with 
perspiration and promptly resort to the 
indoors. 

So it was on Saturday. Until 2 o'clock 
of the afternoon it might have been said 
of Annville that it had never been dry- 
er, nay, not even during Prohibition. 
With surrounding points inundated, 
Annville May feters pointed with pride 
to unbedewed, Sahara-Like sidewalks and 
(Continued on Page 2, Column 8) 



I. R. C. Elects Officers 



The International Relations Club 
cabinet met Thursday noon, when, 
among other items of business, the 
election of officers for the coining 
year was held. It resulted in the elec- 
tion of the following officers: Joseph 
Thomas, president; John Moller, vice- 
president; and Helen Bartlett, secre- 
tary. 

Final plans were also made for a 
hike and picnic, to be held next Wed- 
nesday, May 19, at the "Canyon", 
south of Annville. This will be the 
last meeting of the year and will be 
in charge of the retiring officers of 
the club. All club members and pro- 
spective members are asked to con- 
tact Jean Harnish or Elizabeth Ben- 
der if they expect to attend the out- 
ing. The hikers will meet at the home 
of Dr. Stevenson at 5:00 p. m. 



Celebration Success 
On Philo Anniversary 

"Three-Cornered Moon" and 
Dinner Dance at York- 
towne Share in Festivities 



Nearly sixty couples attended Philo- 
kosmian's dinner-dance, held on Saturday 
night, May 8, in the ballroom of the 
Yorktowne Hotel in York. The dinner- 
dance was a part of the seventieth anni- 
ersary of the society, a celebration which 
also included the presentation of the an- 
nual play "Three Cornered Moon" on 
Friday evening. 

The Yorktowne seems to be a favorite 
goal of the society's annual travels, since 
the affair this year was the second con- 
secutive dance held in that hotel. How- 
ever, the soceity is to be congratulated on 
its having found such a delightful and 
satisfying scene for its festivities. 

Rhythm in its "swingiest" form was 
furnished by Zel Smith and his Pennsyl- 
vania Aces. The orchestra played 
throughout the meal, thus offering oppor- 
tunity for dancing between courses, and 
also performed for the remainder of the 
evening following the dinner. The or- 
ganization lived up to its advance notices 
and did a capable piece of work in thaw- 
ing out stiff joints. 

The favors for the dinner-dance were 
in the form of a two piece leather writ- 
ing set, including a combination port- 
folio and writing pad, and a letter holder, 
handsomely embossed, with the society 
seal stamped on both pieces. 

Although a few of the Freshmen ap- 
peared a bit uncomfortable in their stiff 
shirts and high collars and gazed some- 
what apprehensively at the formidable 
and shining array of silver-ware, and in 
spite of the fact that the affair did not 
get under way until 7 130, nevertheless 
both the dinner and the dance were 
highly successful, with perhaps the piece 
de resistance rating the biggest headlines. 

Professor and Mrs. Carmean and Dr. 
and Mrs. Black acted as chaperones and 
welcomed those alumni who attended, al- 
though their number would hardly have 
been large enough to set the world on 
fire, either for Philo or anything else. 



Largest Number of Votes Cast 
In History of Senate Elec- 
tions 



The election of members of the Men's 
Senate took place in the "Y" room of the 
Men's Dorm on Tuesday, between the 
hours of 10:30 a. m. and 3:00 p. m., un- 
der the supervision of the present senior 
members of the Senate who acted as 
registrars and kept a sharp lookout for 
prospective stuffers of the ballot box. 

The election was a real contest this 
year and it witnessed an interest in par- 
ticipation hitherto unknown or even un- 
dreamed of, for that matter. The num- 
ber of votes in last Tuesday's election 
was probably the largest ever cast in the 
history of the Senate. This seems to in- 
dicate a greater renewal of interest in 
student government, a thing to be hearti- 
ly commended, this interest being meas- 
ured by the number of cliques and par- 
ties which were formed and which were 
active in trying to enlist support for 
their respective candidates. There was 
any number of political bosses and ward 
heelers, all of whom diligently urged 
students to "come to the aid of the par- 
ty." 

The result of the election is as follows : 
Seniors, Adolph Capka, John Gongloff, 
Dean Gasteiger, Charles Raab, Gordon 
Davies, and John Walmer ; Juniors, Stan- 
ley Bulota, Thomas Guinivan, Robert 
Tschopp, Roy Weidman, and Donald 
Ludwig; Sophomores, Paul Horn, John 
Moller, and Robert Artz. 

These men were elected out of a list 
of twice the number of nominees, who 
were selected by the Senate and approved 
by the faculty. The new organization 
now includes 14 men, with one Fresh- 
man to be added next fall as a non- 
voting member. The newly-elected cabi- 
net will meet in the near future to elect 
its officers for the coming year. A keen 
contest is in the offing, especially for the 
office of the presidency, a thing which is 
another sign of healthy political condi- 
tions about the campus. 

ATTEND THE PROM 



L. V. At Penn State 



Somewhere around 1889 a boy by 
the name of A. Howry Espenshade 
attended Lebanon Valley College for 
a short time. Later he went to W T es- 
leyan University and was graduated 
from that institution in 1894. During 
the years that followed this same man 
served as Registrar and Head of the 
Department of Composition at the 
Pennsylvania State College. This year 
Professor Espenshade retires, after 
having served Penn State for thirty- 
nine years. In recognition of his val- 
uable service, a volume has been pub- 
lished by Thos. Nelson and Sons, 
comprising seventeen articles on a va- 
riety of research problems. The long- 
est of these is contributed by another 
L. V. man, Prof. Mason Long of the 
class of 1916, on the subject, "The 
Bible in Anglo-Saxon Literature." 
Thus one L. V. student helps to hon- 
or another L. V. student at a college 
where L. V. men are bringing honor 
to their Alma Mater. 



PAGE TWO 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, MAY 13, 1937 



ESTABLISHED 1926 



A weekly publication by the Undergraduate Students of Lebanon Valley College 



News of the Alumni 



EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 

Charles Boyd Shaffer 



EDITORIAL BOARD 
ASSOCIATE EDITOR 
Mary Louise Stoner, '38 

FEATURE EDITOR SPORTS EDITOR 

William F. Clark, '39 Roger B. Saylor, '38 

REPORTORIAL STAFF 

Clarence Lehman, '39 
Robert Long, '39 
Sarah MacEwen, '39 
Alice Richie, '39 
Samuel Rutter, '39 
Barbara Bowman, '40 
Carl Ehrhart, "40 
Evelyn Evans, '40 
John Ness, '40 
Louise Saylor, '40 

BUSINESS BOARD 

CIRCULATION MANAGER 

Ernest Weirick, '39 
ASSISTANT 

Warren Sechrist, '40 



Clifford Bamhart, '38 
Elizabeth Bender, '88 
Sylva Harclerode, '38 
Ernestine Jagnesak, '38 
Wanda Price, '38 
Calvin Spitler, '38 
Theresa Stefan, '38 
Howard Baier. '39 
Robert Clippinger, '39 
. nomas Guinivan, '39 



BUSINESS MANAGER 

Curvin N. Dellinger, '38 
ASSISTANT 

Raymond Smith, '39 



Single Copies 
Subscription . 



5 cents 

.$1.00 per year 



Entered at the Annville, Pa., post office as second class matter, under the Act of 

March 3, 1879. , , ■ , 

Published weekly through the school period, except during holiday vacation and 

examination week. 



reprhhnted rom national advirthino ur 

National Advertising Service, Inc. 

ColUtf PubUsktrt Rtprrtmtatlvt fc 

420 Madison Ave. New York. N. Y. 
Chicago • Boston - ban Francisco 

LOS ANSBLBS • PORTLAND • Si ATT 1.1 



RAIN ROUTS 

ROYAL REVELERS 



Vol. XIV 



THURSDAY, MAY 13, 1937 



No. 5 



NEW LOWS iN SPORTSMANSHIP 

Last Thursday evening witnessed what was undoubtedly one of the most 
sneaking and unsportsmanlike pieces of vandalism that has occurred on this cam- 
pus in some time. Some individual who conceived himself, or some friend of his, 
affronted by certain statements made in the sporting commentary of this paper, 
deliberately and underhandedly wrecked the sports editor's room during the ab- 
sence of its occupants. Aside from the moral issues that such a cowardly ac* in- 
volves, it also constituted a major infraction of senate regulations,, as much actual 
damage was done. 

We are asking every decent, clear-thinking person to consider this reasoning. 
La Vie has always strongly and consistently boosted our teams and our players. 
We have done this so wholeheartedly that papers from opposing schools have tak- 
en advantage of recent defeats to label us "cocky." If this person will but think 
back—yes, we know who he is — over past issues, he will recall that our columns 
have been lavish in their praise of himr— «r Ms ffieiul. The fact is that while they 
are getting nothing but praises, they are well content to bask in the warm lime- 
light of publicity, but when conditions are reversed and they receive even the 
slightest amount of adverse criticism despite the fact that it's actual truth, 
they haven't the moral fiber— they haven't the stuff it takes to enable them to get 
up on their feet and take it like a man. W e don't expect them to grin while so do- 
ing or to like it, but we do expect them to accept it like rational human beings,, li 
the criticism is false, it won't hurt them. If it's true, they'll be the better for hav- 
ing had it. Life isn't all orchids. 

If this person believes that he has bettered his position by such actions, he is 
mistaken. If he believes that he has intimidated the editors of La Vie into syco- 
phantically giving credit where credit is not due, he is again mistaken. In all 
charity, we trust that he may glean some meager consolation from the thought 
that his presence in college is due, not to the ignorance of his identity, but rather 
to the thoroughly sneaking manner in which he did his work, and from the realiza- 
tion of the contempt in which his associates would hold him, were this identity 
made known. 



{Continued from page 1) 



Message To The Alumni 

To My Fellow Alumni: 

It has been the endeavor of the officers of the Alumni Council during the 
year to establish the organization on the basis of the new constitutin in full 
co-operation with the college administration. 

To reach this objective it is important that we have the hearty co-opera- 
tion of all the Lebanon Valley College Clubs and the college classes. You will 
recall that under the new constitution the powers of the Alumni Association 
.are vested in the Alumni Council, a type of organization in vogue in all the 
leading colleges and universities. 

The members of this Council are elected by the classes, Alumni Clubs, 
and three at large by the Association. 

In order that the Alumni may be adequately represented at the meeting 
of the Council, June 5, 1 appeal to all the college classes and l>ebanon Valley 
College Clubs to send properly certified representatives to the meeting of the 
Council, June 5. 

We are planning an interesting program for the Alumni Banquet Satur- 
day evening, June 5, and your presence will be much appreciated. 

J. PAUL RUPP 

President. 



smiling skies. 

Then came the storm. Heralded by 
his sombre servants, King Pluvius pre- 
cipitated himself upon the campus green 
doing a graceful tap dance known as the 
patter. But the redoubtable poteutate 
was not thus content. He soon began to 
assert his natural rights to the throne 
of the May Queen. 

His pretentions finally became so per- 
suasive and demonstrative that Miss 
Harbold and her court were compelled 
to beat a hasty retreat, yielding reluc- 
tantly the lield to the victor. 

With the Queen and her attendants, 
fled in rout those hangers-on and enter- 
tainers of the court. May pole cavorters 
in ice-cream trousers and filmy laces, 
grotesque pirates in dashing outfits, 
clowns besmirched on cheek and schnoz- 
zie, with colors, not flying, but stream- 
ing — all broke pell-mell for the shelter 
of nearby buildings. 

Soldiers and peasants, dancers and 
musicians, organ grinder and acrobats 
with one accord abandoned the held of 
combat to the ad-powerful invader.- 

Not last to leave were the hundreds 
of spectators hopefully perched upon the 
tiers of bleachers, xvnd closely follow- 
ing in their wake were to be seen the 
bourgeois venuers and hawkers of re- 
freshments, who impotently cursed that 
arch-despoiler of crowds and conces- 
sions, Jupiter J. Pluvius. 

Meanwhile in nearby Engle Hall, to 
which most took refuge, disappointed 
visitors and students were entertained 
by a concert of the band and by other 
musical features. 

Also in the Ad Building and in the 
dormitories, still others amused them- 
selves in various pursuits, especially 
chose of inspection and conversation. 
Some recalled former visitations of the 
notoriously unwelcome guest to previous- 
May fetes. Always, they asserted, he 
would have his perverse way, being of 
an incurably persistent and unyielding 
nature. 

For example, they pointed to two 
years before last. Twice that year the 
affair was rained out and postponed, on- 
ly to be successfully staged upon the 
third attempt. 

Bystanders hearing this information, 
expressed the hope that such will not be 
the case this year. Those in charge an- 
nounced that the fete would take place 
next Saturday, the originally appointed 
rain date. The time will be 1 o'clock, 
instead of 2 as upon unlucky Saturday 
last. 

GOING TO THE PROM? 



COMMENCEMENT 
WEEK 



Friday, June 4 — Meeting of the Board 

of Trustees. 
Saturday, June 5 — Alumni Day: 
9:30 — Meeting of Alumni Associa- 
tion in Room 18. 
10:00 — Meeting of Alumni Council in 

Room 18. 
11:30— Meeting of L Club. 
12:15 — Luncheon. 
1:30 — Alumni Parade. 
2:00-Class Day. 

4:00 — Reception by President and 

Mrs. Lynch. 
7:30 — Alumni Banquet, Hershey Golf 
Course Club Dining Room. 

Sunday, June 6 — Baccalaureate Ser- 
mon by Rev. H. E. Miller, D.D. 

Monday, 10:00 A. M. — Sixty - eighth 
Commencement, Dr. Wilder 
1) wight Bancroft, Cornell Uni- 
versity. 



Another Generation in College 



It is gratifying to note the large number of students now in attend 
whose parents graduated from Lebanon Valley College. The following ^ 
record for 1936-37: 

Students Parents 

SENIORS 

Bachman, Edward Sara Strickler (Bachman), '12 

Harnish, Mary Jean (Clair Harnish, '12 

(Edith Gingrich (Harnish), '13 

Kinney, Charles B Effie Shroyer (Kinney), '07 

Lynch, Eleanor Clyde A. Lynch, '18 

Mulhollen, Belle Victor D. Mulhollen, '13 

Rutherford, Allen Frank Allen Rutherford, '10 

Shroyer, Wilbur (Alvin Edgar Shroyer, '00 

(Lillian G. Kreider (Shroyer), 'oq 

JUNIORS 

Aungst, Clarence Frank C. Aungst, '25 

Barnhart, Clifford Thomas J. Barnhart, '34 

Bender, Elizabeth Andrew Bender, '06 

Butterwick, Helen Robert R. Butterwick, '01 

Gibble, Wilbur Phares B. Gibble, '15 

Harclerode, Sylva William M. Harclerode, '23 

Mills, Catharine (Alfred K. Mills, '04 

(Edith Frantz (Mills), 08 
Saylor, Roger B — (Roger B. Saylor, '11 

(Edna Kilmer (Saylor), '12 

SOPHOMORES 

Bartlett, Helen 

Kinney, Harlin 

Lawson, Catharine - 

Light, Anna Louise 

Light, Harold 

Metzgar, Edith — 



the 



Edith Lelunan (Bartlett), '13 
Effie Shroyer (Kinney), '07 
Thomas Lawson, '02 
Boaz Light, '13 
Raymond H. Light, '16 
Maurice Metzgar, '07 



Morrison, Anna - - John Morrison, '32 

Richie, Alice ~ (Gustavus Adolphus Richie, '13 

(Belle Orris (Richie), '15 

Strickler, Evelyn Ethel Strickler (Klopp), '17 

Wert, Russel H Mark Hopkins Wert, '13 



FRESHMEN 
Bender, William 
Ehrhart, Carl ... 



Andrew Bender, '06 

(Oliver T. Ehrhart, '11 

(Edna Yarkers (Ehrhart), '18 

Evans, Evelyn — (David J. Evans, '16 

(Naomi Hand (Evans), '17 

Grimm, Robert „ Samuel Oliver Grimm, '12 

Kauffman, Richard Artus O. Kauffman, '11 



Lynch, John 
Ness, John . 



Saylor, Louise 



Strayer, Robert C. 
Sumner, Doyle 



PART-TIME 
Shenk, Elizabeth 



. Clyde A. Lynch, '18 
.(John H. Ness, '15 

(Myra Kiracofe (Ness), '15 
.(Roger B. Saylor, '11 

(Edna Kilmer (Saylor), '12 
. J. Curvin Strayer, '06 
. Alfred C. T. Sumner, '02 

Cyrus E. Shenk, '06 




"/ tell you Long Distance rates are 
reduced ALL DA Y SUNDA Y and 
after seven every night/' 

• Everyone agrees that a "homo 
run" by telephone saves tim 
and money — especially at th 
reduced night and Sunday rates- 

THE BELL TELEPHONE COMPANY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, MAY 13, 1937 



PAGE THREE 



Alumni Active In Many Fields 



L. V. Graduates Shows 
Brilliant Records 



Eminent Scientists 
Represent Alma Mater 

OLDEST GRAD REPORTS 



Alumni Prominent in Religi- 
ous, Literary, and Scientific 
Work 



The members of the Alumni Associa- 
tion may be interested to learn of the ac- 
tivities of the oldest graduate of Leb- 
anon Valley College, Rev. J. Henry 
Graybeill, of the Class of 1872. He has 
successively been a teacher in Anville 
and Pittsburgh, and Pastor of the Pres- 
byterian Church in Dayton, Ohio and of 
the Shiloh Presbyterian Church at St- 
Marys, Pennsylvania. 

Since 1920, he has been Pastor emerit- 
us. His activities are illustrated by the 
following letter : 

1950 Bellevue Road 
Harrisburg, Penna. 
April 28, 1937 
Mein Lieber Freund : 
Guten morgen ! Gesundheit ! 
I just returned from the Southland. 
Spent the greater part of the season on 
the West Coast. Had a splendid time. 

I expect to go to the meeting of the 
Presbytecian General Assembly which 
meets in Columbus, Ohio. I expect to 
spend a number of weeks in Canada. 
Am enclosing check for annual dues. 
With my very best wishes to you. 
Sincerely, 

J. Henry Graybeill 
# # • 

William S. Ebersole— '85, 616 5th 
Avenue, Mount Vernon, Iowa. 

Post Graduate : Am. School of Clas- 
sical Studies, Athens, Greece; Yale; 
University Munich, Germany ; 

Professor Latin, San Juaquin Valley 
C °llege, California, 1885-87; of Greek, 
L - V. C. 1887-90. ; of Greek and Archael- 
°gy, Cornell College, Iowa 1893— Retired. 

Publications: "The Metopees of the 
West End of the Parthenon" in Ameri- 
can Journal of Archaeology, numerous 
book reviews. 

Acting President of Cornell College, 



Bancroft of Cornell 
Commencement Speaker 

Lebanon Valley College is bringing to 
the campus as the Commencement speak- 
er this year an eminent scholar in the 
field of chemistry, Dr. Wilder Dwight 
Bancroft of Cornell University. Dr. 
Bancroft was educated at Harvard, 
Strassburg, Leipzig, Berlin, and Amster- 
dam Universities. He was granted the 
Ph.D. degree at Leipzig in 1892. He has 
been Professor of Chemistry at Cornell 
since 1903 and is the editor of the Journal 
of Physical Chemistry and associate- 
editor of the Journal of Franklin Insti- 
tute. He is the author of numerous pub- 
lications, including The Phase Rule, 1897, 
and Applied Colloid Chemistry, 1921. Dr. 
Bancroft is not only an eminent scientist, 
but also a very interesting speaker. 



1V2 years, Registrar, 20 years, recalled 
to be registrar for the year 1936-37. 

• • • 

Ralph E. Crabill, 1916, 182 Euclide 
Avenue, Jamestown, N. Y. 

Teacher and coach Missouri Military 
Academy, Mexico, Missouri, 1916-17 and 
1919-20, A. E. F. Lieutenant Coast Ar- 
tillary and Air Service 1917-19. Oil 
Producer, Tulsa, Oklahoma, 1920-22. 
Theatre Executive Balahan & Kotz Corp. 
Chicago, 111., 1922-25. General Manager, 
Western Division Publix Theatre 1925- 
32, General Manager Warner Bros. 
Theatres, Western New York State, 
1932-37- 

• • • 

Frederick Stanley Smith, 1910, New 
Hampshire Ave., Southern Pines, N. C. 

Associate American Guild of Organ- 
ists, Westminster Choir School and Con- 
cord Summer Music School, Dean of 
Music, Lenoir Rhyne College, Hickory, 
N. C. '28-32. Pub. School Music Super- 
visor Southern Pines, N. C, 32-37. 

Music Appreciation, Dec. '36, N. C. 
Education Magazine ; Revel of the 
Nymphs in April 1937 Etude. 

Twenty-eight music compositions pub- 
lished for organ, piano, voice, violin, male 
chorus, mixed sacred choruses, by G. 
Schirmcr, N. Y. ; Ditson, Boston; Wit- 
mark, N. Y. ; Summy, Chicago ; Presser, 
Phila. ; Whitesmith, Boston. 

• * • 

Norman C. Schlichter Litt.D. (Class 
of '97) has had two poems published re- 



Alumni ! Alumni ! Alumni ! 



Join the Big Parade on June 5th. 

Now is the time to ask the Boss for the day off. Better still, 
bring the "Boss" along and the kids, too. 

Return to L. V. C. and make your Alumni Day successful. The 
classes listed in the margin will have a short parade with the college 
band in the lead. Time— 1:30 p. m. Come and see it. Then, improve 
°'i it next year. 

Annville can be reached by train; good roads lead to L. V. C ( 
to °. If hitch hiking, tie a Lebanon Valley pennant on your thumb 
and your pals will pick you up. 

10:00 a. m. — Alumni business meeting. 

12:15 p. m. — Alumni luncheon. 
1:30 p. m. — Alumni parade by classes. 

2:15 p. in. — Class reunions. Alumni Banquet in the evening. 
ALUMNI DAY IS YOUR DAY— We will be seeing you on 
•' 'me 5th. 

DR. R. W. WILLIAMS, '17 

General Chairman of Alumni Reunions. 



19V 



1912 



1907 



1902 



1897 



1892 




Dr. Clyde A. Lynch 

TO OUR ALUMNI EVERYWHERE: 

It is a pleasure, indeed, to be permitted to utilize the columns of La Vie 
Collegienne to extend to all the graduates and other former students of 
Lebanon Valley College my personal greetings. 

And with these sincere greetings let me express the hope that many of 
you may be permitted to return to the Campus for the varied activities of 
Commencement Week, especially for the events associated with Alumni Day. 
A very good and attractive program has been prepared, and I am sure that 
your enthusiastic participation will not only be pleasurable and profitable for 
you, but will tend to solidify the members of the Alumni Association in co- 
operative planning and service for the advancement of the best interests of 
our beloved Alma Mater. 

Mrs. Lynch and I are extending you an urgent invitation to be present at 
the annual reception to be tendered the alumni and the members of the senior 
class in our home on Saturday afternoon, June 5, following the Class Day ex- 
ercises in the Chapel. We shall be delighted again to take your band in token 
of good fellowship, the binding and sacred memories of other years, and our 
united pledge to rarry on all the more devotedly the great work of enlarging 
and strengthening the institution to which we are all so heavily and everlast- 
ingly indebted. 

CLYDE A. LYNCH 

President of Lebanon Valtjsy Coj.lec.e. 



cently in Poetry lof Today, the quarterly 
magazine of the Poetry Society of Lon- 
don. One of them, "Lament for Two 
Kings," is a tribute to Kipling. Mrs. 
Kipling has written the author to express 
her personal appreciation of this poem, 
and Archibald Rutledge, eminent Ameri- 
can poet, has called it "beautiful, sensi- 
tive, poignant, and possessing the univer- 
sal note." 

* * * 

Mr. Maryan P. Matuszak 

310 E. 6th Street 
Bartlesville, Oklahoma 

Books written — "Gas-Analysis Manual 
for Use with Apparatus of the Orsat 
Type," Fisher Scientific Company, Pitts- 
burgh, Pa. 1934. 

Positions held since graduation : Grad- 
uate Assistant and assistant, Ohio State 
University, 1924-28 ; Instructor, Caiieton 
College, 1929; Assistant Professor, Wit- 
tenberg College, 1929-30; Associate Phy- 
sical Chemist, U. S. Bureau of Mines, 
Pittsburgh, Pa., 1930-33 ; Director of De- 
velopment, Fisher Scientific Co-, Pitts- 
burgh, Pa., 1933-34; Research Chemist, 
Phillips Petroleum Company, Bartles- 
ville, Okla., ■ I934-- 
Contributions to publications : 

1. "Composition of Copper Xanthate," 
J. Am. Chem. Soc, 53, 4451 (1931) 

2. "Dodometric Determination of Car- 
bon Disulfide," End. Eng. Chem., Anal. 
Ed., 4, 98 (1932) 

3. "Unitized Gas-Analysis Apparatus," 
Ind. Eng. Chem., Anal. Ed., 6, 72 (1934) 

4. "The Action of Phosgene on Ace- 
tone," J. Am. Chem., Soc, 56,2007 (1934) 

5. "Determination of Phosgene by the 
Soda Method : Effect of Fire Extinguish- 
er Chlorinated Hydrocarbons," Ind. Eng. 
Chem-, Anal. Ed., 6, 374 (1934) 



Alumni "L" Club 



There will be a meeting of the L 
Club Saturday morning, June 5, at 
11:30 in Room 16, Administration 
Building. 



Notice! Alumni 



Do you know of any prospective 
student with exceptional scholastic or 
athletic qualifications? Have you tried 
to interest them in Lebanon Valley 
College, your Alma Mater? Send 
along all the information, a letter to 
the College Office or your Alumni 
Secretary will provide the means of 
placing all of us on the job. Adver- 
tising by newspaper, circular, or bul- 
letin is perhaps a profitable and use- 
ful way of attracting new students 
to the campus of I/ebanon Valley 
College, but it is aften the more per- 
sonal contact, and that by an alum- 
nus of the college especially, that 
reaps the fullest harvest. 



Alumni Giving Fund 
1936-37 



Russell E. Dennis '32 

S. H, Derickson '02 

Esther B. Booth '17 

W. G. Clippinger '99 

Viola B. Dietrich '31 

Ruth M. Evans '20 

Dorothy F. Grimm '36 

Edgar C. Hastings '21 

Stella M. Hughes '25 

H. M. B. Lehn '08 

Kathryn A. Leisey '33 

Russell E. Morgan '31 

Mary E. Burkholder '28 

Grace Keener '29 

Marian E. Leisey '36 

Ira S. Ernst '16 

Charles L. Hauck, Jr '35 

W. N. Martin '18 

Donald E. Fields '24 

I. W. Sneath '81 

Hilda Buckley '32 

O. E. Good '94 

Robert C. Heath '34 

F. E. Stengle '15 

H. M. Imboden '99 

Calvin H. Reber, Jr '36 

Carl W. Heiser '22 

E. H. Carmany '12 

G. Mahlon Miller '99 

Edwin Ziegler '17 

Clyde A. Lynch '18 

H. H. Shenk , '00 



Attention, Alumni! 



I take the liberty of calling the attention of the Alumni to several items 
of interest. 

1. We must have a new alumni directory, bringing the records of our 
graduates up to date. The accuracy of this directory will depend upon the 
responses we receive from you. Fill out the blank mailed you promptly. If 
you have mislaid it, follow instructions given on the blank published in this 
issue. There has not been any published since 1928. 

2. The registrar's office, under the very efficient direction of Miss Gladys 
Fencil, 1921, Assistant Registrar, has completed, with the aid of students 
working under the N. Y. A., a complete list of former students of the vari- 
ous departments of the college who did not complete the work for a degree. 

This list numbers 5,850 and includes students in the following depart- 
ments: College, Music, Extension, Summer Session, Normal, Art, Oratory, 
Preparatory, and Graduate Work. This list has not been checked completely 
to determine how many are living and the present addresses of a large num- 
ber are not known; We ask your aid in reporting the addresses of any for- 
mer students who reside in your community. Invite them to become members 
of your local clubs, for they are entitled to Associate memberhsip in the As- 
sociation. 

3. You will abservet.that the new constitution provides for annual dues 
of two dollars each and life membership of twenty-five dollars each. Dues for 
several life memberships have been received within the last few 
weeks. The Alumni Association could render great service to the college if all 
members paid their annual dues, or became life members. 

4. Report to this office any reports of vacancies in any field whatsoever 
that may come to your notice in order that we may help our graduates to 
secure positions. 

5. Send us the names of outstanding young men and women for our list 
of prospective students. 

H. H. SHENK, Secretary. 



PAGE FOUR 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, MAY 13, 1937 



Familiar Campus Scenes 




ADMINISTRATION BUILDING 

Where students have attended 
classes since 1905. 




SOUTH HALL 

The retreat for the sick and the well. 
A girls' dormitory. 




PRESIDENTS HOME 

7s the student's refuge when he needs friendly counsel. 




IN THE SPRINGTIME 

A shady path leads to the campus' Carnegie Library. 





CARNEGIE LIBRARY 

The cultural center of 
Lebanon Valley College 




ENGLE CONSERVATORY 

Destination of students and 
professors at 8:55 a. m. 




NORTH HALL 

The most popular place on the campus when 
students crave refreshment. 



MEN'S DORMITORY 

The scene of scholarly activities, where 
a man can sleep o' nights. 



4 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, MAY 13, 1937 



PAGE FIVE 



Sport! 



0m BEARS DOWN 

yn niiuu uuiunmcn 

IOLL ALLOWS TWO HITS 

yVildonger, the Star ot tJears 
/vttacK; Trey ntcnes Jfirst 

I'lie ursinus liears handed Lebanon 
\ alley s Allying Dutchmen their second 
a gue ueieat in four days on friday to 
[Ue tune of 5-iJ. Led by Wildonger, tlie 
j^ears took an early lead and set the 
e throughout the game, iioth Z.0I1, 
^ ne winning pitcher, and Jfrey, the loser, 
itched games in spite of some 

ragg ea su PP ort on tne P art 01 their 
ieaUiUia tes. £oll was touched for only 
tnree singles, two of which came in suc- 
cession in the sixth inning. A total of 
eight hits was garnered off Frey's de- 
livery. 

The Ursinus team wasted no time in 
juuiping to the fore. Murray opened the 
game by lashing a single to centeriield 
and reached third while Jfancoast and 
Costello were being thrown out on field- 
ers' choices. Wildonger, Ursinus iirst- 
baseman, then smashed a drive to deep 
left which M oiler misjudged, and it went 
lor a three-bagger, Murray crossing the 
plate in the meantime. A single to cen- 
ter by Edwards scored W ildonger with 
run number two. 

The next scoring outburst occured in 
the third inning. With one down Pan- 
coast reached second when Davies threw 
his grounder away. He went to third as 
Capka tossed out Costello. Once again 
Wildonger proved a thorn in Frey's side 
by clouting a two-bagger to left, scoring 
fancoast. Edwards then ended the dam- 
age by popping up to Capka. In the 
tilth Prey got himself into some trouble 
when with two down Snyder singled t<> 
center. Zoll and Murray then drew pass- 
es, but Frey came through unscathed 
when Pancoast grounded to Davies. 

The Flying Dutchmen finally came to 
life in the sixth frame. With one down 
Capka singled to left and Walk did like- 
wise to center. The latter, however, was 
forced on a grounder to Moyer, Capka 
going to third. Capka then crossed the 
plate on a double steal. 

Prey went along well until the eighth 
when the ever-dangerous Wildonger 
opened with a single to center. Edwards 
sacrificed him along to second and 
Tworzydlo's hit to right sent him home. 
Moyer walked. After Snyder's fly out to 
center, Tworzydlo streaked toward third 
base and got all the way home when 
a wild peg hit him on the foot. That 
finished the scoring for the day. 
URSINUS 

AB B HPO A E 

Mur ray, If _ _ 4 1110 

p ancoast, c f _ 5 1 3 

Costello, 3b - 4 4 

Wildonger, lb 5 2 3 11 

^wards, c 3 1 7 1 

^orzydlo, rf 4 112 

y* r > ss _ 3 1 2 3 2 

fV***> % 4 1111 

° U » P 8 3 

Tot &ls ~- 35 5 8 27 11 4 

LEBANON VALLEY 

AB R HPO A E 

0ller > If 2 

>* n >lf 2 

Walk"' SS - ~ 4 1 1 4 4 ° 
H c 4 1 2 

• B iUett, 2b 4 1 2 3 

p 6 ^ ^ 4 1 

o'av lett ' cf 4 1 3 

a Ies ' * ._ _ 3 1 2 2 

folo e - Verling 1 

*V lUak ' lb 3 13 

y ' P 2 1 4 

a ^° tals 33 2 3 27 13 2 

{7r »S^ atted f ° r Davies in the ninth - 

ie6 a 201 000 020—5 

Tkni V <dley 000 002 000—2 



Heisch Gets Invitation 

For Inquirer Contest 

Late in August the Philadelphia In- 
quirer Athletic Association plans to spon- 
sor a football game between the Philadel- 
phia Eagles of the National Professional 
League and a group of college All-Stars 
recruited from the State of Pennsylvania 
and any other institutions within a radius 
of one hundred and fifty miles of Phila- 
delphia. The Inquirer will conduct a vot- 
ing contest starting May 16 to decide the 
personnel of the All-Stars. Present se- 
niors from many colleges in this area 
have been invited to play if they are 
elected, among them Arthur Heisch, for 
four years a member of the Lebanon Val- 
ley football team. 

Mr. Heisch has accepted the invitation 
to participate. After due consideration he 
decided to vie for one of the end posi- 
tions, that being the position upon which 
he concentrated this past season. He must 
now wait to see if he is one of the five 
ends to be chosen, thereby giving Leb- 
anon Valley representation on the All- 
Star team. 

Editor's note — It is requested that all 
those interested in Lebanon Valley Col- 
lege support Mr. Heisch. His being elect- 
ed would not only benefit him, but would 
also bring publicity to the college as a 
whole. Watch the lnqwrer for particu- 
lars. 

ATTEND THE PROM 



L W. R. NOTES 



Flora Strayer officiated at the student 
prayer meeting held in Philo Hall on 
Wednesday, May 5, 1937- Helen Bart- 
lett, the speaker, appropriately reflected 
the awakening world of nature. Flora 
Strayer's father, a visitor, offered the 
closing prayer. 

• • • 

The Life Work Recruit deputation 
conducted an afternoon service at the 
Lebanon County Jail on Sunday, May 
9, at 2 o'clock. Ethel Houtz was in 
charge of the service; Paul Slonaker, 
the devotional leader, read the scrip- 
ture lesson from Proverbs and offered 
prayer. Paul Myers delivered the disser- 
tation The Four Answers of God. Ester 
Wise representing the Conservatory vo- 
calized a selection appropriate for Moth- 
er's Day. Her accompanist was Edith 
Metzger. 

• • » 

The Life Work Recruits experienced a 
very delightful time Wednesday evening, 
May 5, 1937, at the Main Street residence 
of Dr. and Mrs. Richie. The group was 
divided into divisions of four, each en- 
tertained in a unique fashion by intellec- 
tual games. The guests included Dr. and 
Mrs. C. A. Lynch and Dr. and Mrs. W. 
A. Wilt. After a hospitable social hour 
the entertainment was brought to a close, 
but not quite to a close either. When 
the group stepped out on the porch after 
the party the members saw that it was 
raining, and thus the scene was laid for 
a touching little human interest drama. 
When several remarked that they had no 
umbrellas, Edith Metzger kindly gave 
hers to Howard Peffley, who in turn 
collared the unsuspecting Paul Myers, 
also without an umbrella, and offered to 
see that he remained dry throughout the 
walk to the Dormitory. John Ness then 
politely offered the protection of his um- 
brella to the "umbrellaless" Miss Metz- 
ger, an offer which was graciously ac- 
cepted, and thus the procession wended 
its way homeward, Ness richer by one 
Fraeulein and Myers poorer by one. The 
Jfe Work Recruits! of all places. 



Features 



DREXEL TECH, JUNIATA 

DEFEATED IN TENNIS 



(Continued from page 1) 



ease, only "Sheen" Shenk and Charley 
Kinney were forced to go three sets. The 
lone Juniata victory was scored in the 
second doubles match, Wenger and 
Schock beating Evelev and Umberger af- 
ter a hard fight. The summaries : 
L. V. G— 6 ; Drexel— 3. 

Singles 

Donmoyer, L. V. C. defeated Shimp, 
Drexel 6-0 ; 6-3. 

Shapiro, L. V. C. defeated Blackstone, 
Drexel 6-1 ; 6-2. 

Shenk, L. V. C. defeated Reese, Drexel 
6-2; 2-6; 6-2. 

Schneider, Drexel defeated Umberger, 
L. V. C. 7-5 ; 6-3. 

Snell, L. V. C. defeated Switzer, Drex- 
el 6-1 ; 6-2. 

Snyder, Drexel defeated Evelev, L. V. 
C. 6-2; 6-3. 

Doubles 

Donmoyer and Shenk, L. V. C. defeat- 
ed Shimp and Schneider, Drexel 6-4 ; 6-3. 

Shapiro and Snell, L. V. C. defeated 
Black and Jordan, Drexel 6-2; 2-6; 6-1. 

Snyder and Reese, Drexel defeated 
Umberger and Evelev, L. V. C. 6-2; 6-3. 

L. V. C— 8; Juniata— 1. 

Singles 

Donmoyer, L. V. C. defeated Sieber, 
Juniata 6-0; 6-0. 

Shapiro, L. V. C. defeated Garner, Ju- 
niata 6-2; 6-3. 

Shenk, L. V. C. defeated Wenger, Ju- 
niata 2-6; 6-2; 7-5. 

Umberger, L. V. C. defeated Schock, 
Juniata 7-5 ; 6-0. 

Evelev, L. V. C. defeated Cazer, Ju- 
niata 6-2; 6-4. 

Kinney, L. V. C. defeated Beck, Ju- 
niata 6-4; 1-6; 6-3. 



Notice To Alumni 



In the event you have misplaced the blank that was mailed you recently re- 
questing information for the new Alumni Directory, please furnish the desired 
data listed below at your earliest convenience. We need your cooperation to make 
the coming publication accurate and complete. 

Name and Class _ „ 

Residence 

Street City or Town State 

Degrees at Lebanon Valley or elsewhere 

Post-graduate work 

If married, when and to whom 

Name and date of birth of children, if any r 

Positions held since graduation (dates) 

Contributions to publications 

Books written „ 

Other information 

Mail to H. H. Shenk, Akvmtrvi Secretary, Anaiville, Pa. 




ESKIMO PIPE 



SAY JUDGE, THIS 
WALRUS -TUSK PIPE 
IS HARD AS ROCK. 
THOSE ESKIMOS 
MUST LIKE TOUGH 
CARVING 



NOT NECESSARILY 
SON. THEY USED 
WALRUS -TUSK 
BECAUSE IT MAKES 
A COOL- SMOKING 




THEN I CERTAINLY 
WISH "THIS PIPE 
OF MINE WERE 

MADE OF 
WALRUS -TUSK! 





SOMETHING TELLS 
ME YOU'VE NEVER 
SMOKED PRINCE 
ALBERT IN THAT 
BRIAR, SON. 
HERE 




PRINCE ALBERT IS SPECIALLY TREATED FOR 
COOL SMOKING. THANKS TO THE V CRIMP CUT/ 
IT PACKS AND DRAWS RIGHT — BURNS 
EVENLY AND SLOWLY 



Copyright, 1937, It. J. Reynolds Tobacco Company 




AND THE x NO-BlTE' 

process removes 
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JUDGE, PRINCE ALBERT 

IS ALL YOU SAV - 
AND THEN SOME?! 




pipefuls of fragrant tobacco in 
every 2-oz. tin of Prince Albert 



PRINCE ALBERT MONEY- 
BACK GUARANTEE 

Smoke 20 fragrant pipefuls of 
Prince Albert. If you don't find 
it the mellowest, tastiest pipe 
tobacco you ever smoked, re- 
turn the pocket tin with the 
rest of the tobacco in it to us at 
any time within a month from 
this date, and we will refund 
full purchase price, plus post- 
age. (Signed) R. J. Reynolds 
Tobacco Company, Winston- 
Salem, North Carolina. 



OUR OFFER 



Prince Albert 



THE NATIONAL 
JOY SMOKE 




PAGE SIX 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, MAY 13, 1937 



TSCHOPP TOPNOTCH IN 

THREE-CORNERED MOON 



(Continued from page 1) 



Seiverling, a newcomer to the L. V- 
stage, it must be admitted, shows definite 
promise and deserves even more definite 
commendation for the vitality of his his- 
trionics and the deft nuances with which 
he occasionally pointed his lines. In fact, 
all we regret with regard to Mr. Seiver- 
ling is that he allowed the obvious pre- 
dilection of the director for a machine- 
gun delivery to mar a role. Mind you, 
it's not the quality of his characteriza- 
tion against which we are railing. It's 
merely the quantity — of which the man 
had enough for a presentation under the 
combined auspices of Billy Rose, Max 
Reinhardt (phooey!), and the Ringling 
Brothers, who, we thank whatever Gods 
may be, could not very well put on more 
than a puppet show in Engle Hall. 

Brutes that we are, by this time we 
have probably said enough to break the 
heart of Harold Phillips, who practically 
worked himself into a psycho-neurotic 
frazzle trying to whip the cast into shape. 
Therefore, we shall take time out at this 
point to feel sorry for him and offer 
commiseration. We think he had the 
right idea — the trouble was that not even 
a superman could instil any correct ideas 
on the dramatic art into the heads of 
most of the members of the cast whom 
we have not already mentioned. They 
floundered about the stage breaking down 
in their laughs, transforming restrained 
embraces into passionless pawing that re- 
sembled nothing so much as the epicene, 
erotic activities of a couple of high school 
sophomores out on their first date after 
reading Bad Girl, committing small tech- 
nical errors by the score, and pretty gen- 
erally comporting themselves as though 
it were more of a trial for them to be on 
the stage than for us to watch them, 
which was some tall trialling, if we may 
coin a term, and even taller if we may 
not 

The acting, in short, we did not like. 
We wanted to say some more on the sub- 
ject, to be perfectly frank, and work in 
some metaphor about Thalia (Of course 
you know Thalia!) that would show 
everybody how much we know about the 
Muses, and Bullfinch, and all those my- 
thological people, but as long as we are 
railing against bad art, it may be safer 
to refrain from the practices thereof 
ourselves. Therefore we shall move from 
this point abruptly into a discussion of 
the scenery, which deserves some kindly 
comment for being the first attempt at 
anything really resembling a stage setting 
at L. V. C. for some time. Let us hope 
that Three-Cornered Moon marks the end 
of the era wehn local stage-technicians 
could fool the public into thinking they 
had a stage setting when they saw some 
pictures hung on a few velvet drapes 
and some furniture arranged about a 
seemingly inescapable fire-place. We say 
"let us hope" with some emphasis, for 
the scenery was really a step in the right 
direction — if there is a right direction. 
It would have seemed to us the better 
part of wisdom, it is true to extend the 
realistic flats which covered half the 
stage all the way around and do away 
with the symbolism of two rooms which 
the compromise was suppose to represent, 
but, anyhow, we liked it, which, as we 
are aware some people are saying, is 
something, anyway. 

And with that, we shall conclude our 
remarks, by now having left nothing 
pertinent untouched — or, as you will, un- 
scathed — without so much as the usual 
fol-de-rol about the strict impartiality of 
our judgment, which you readers both 
dear and otherwise are wont in any event 
to discount. 

And, oh yes, we almost forgot; why 
don't they ever give the petite Jean Har- 
nish who played the strictly non-English 
maid with such verve a better part? The 
girl intrigues us. 

And next time, boys, if you must put 
water in whiskey bottles, at least change 
the script to read gin. It's points like 
these that get our indigestion riled. 



archy 
and 
mehitabel 



with apologies to don marquis 



mehitabel i am definitely sore 

this friend of mine that i told you 

about last week 

the one that came with the 

obstetrical instruments well it 

appears he has a job as a claims 

agent for the department store where 

the editor bought my new typewriter 

with all capital letters which i 

used last week 

well this dirty bum came .and took 
it away he said the paper had 
failed to keep up the installments 
so far as i am concerned he is 
the scum of the earth 
the lousy cockroach 

i am also sore mehitabel on account 
of the off campus women who have been 
bothering me of late 
but you need have no fear i am true 
to you 

anyhow these off campus girls 

get more people than me sore 

the ones tink and a couple of the 

other boys brought up for the philo 

dinner dance for instance 

decided to light out from the 

dance and go to the Valencia to hear 

benny goodman at two smacks a throw 

boy do things like that burn me up 

i am glad you re not like that 

mehitabel 

then they stayed i think it was the 
same ones at a hotel overnight with 
the result that dave foreman and tink 
iiad to go through the whole men s 
dorm early sunday a m to borrow 
enough samoleons so these frills 
could get past the house dick with 
their suit cases 

then there was another one that jake 
brought up for the dance from new 
jersey 

on sunday afternoon he says to 
her let s go for a walk 

k says she and invites about six 
other guys along 

and poor eastland 
gallant jake they call him got 
stuck with the bill so i guess he too 
is burned up 

he did not burn nearly as fast though 
aiehitabel as one of my colleagues 
a reporter on la vie 
it seems la vie has offices in the 
conserve annex and also in the libe 
but usually uses only the latter 
my colleague says however he had 
occasion to enter the annex office 
the other day 

so armed with his little key he 
busted into what he said lo 
and behold had become the boudoir 
of miss miller the piano teacher 
he did not mind so much but he 
says miss miller regards him 
with suspicion 

how was he to know she changed his 

old office into a boudoir while 

he was gone i ask you 

some women are awfully unreasonable 

mehitabel i wish they were all like 

you 

also did you know that when ella 
mason and agnes morris go to the post 
one gets the mail of both by asking 
for mason and morris 
mason and morris these words are 
easy to remember 

so bob tschopp inserted them ad lib 
into the list of names he was 
supposed to read from a newspaper 
in three cornered moon 

1 did it he told me 
just for a gag 

well mehitabel that is all 
until next time 

archy 




Dear Vox Populi: 

Several weeks ago, we noticed an ar- 
ticle by the Editor inviting criticism on 
important issues of the day. It was with 
anticipation that we looked forward for 
the next issues of the La Vie — with an- 
ticipation, I say, of noticing something 
new — something with a little spice to it 
— and what do we read? nothing but a 
more asinine characterization of the de- 
funct "Villain," who has the audacity of 
calling himself '^Cerebrus," and then 
again "A Publico!" 

Why, in all God's earth, does not this 
character sell himself to the Annville 
Journal, or some other prosperous news- 
paper where his pet theories may be 
aired to a greater extent? His ideas are 
not only one-tracked, but we are con- 
fident that, after having looked over 
some of his work, he is not capable of 
producing anything that will appeal to 
the intellectual minds, or that will create 
a favorable impression for La Vie. 

We would suggest, dear Editor, that 
you tap him on the bean rather soundly, 
that he may realize the fallacy of his 
present trends. If he does not come 
across with something real, we recom- 
mend that you scratch his name from 
the masthead of La Vie, and give some- 
one of ability an opportunity to make 
good. 

Sincerely, 

X. L. SIOX. 
• • • 

My Dear Mr. Editor: 

It appears that things in general about 
the campus of Lebanon Valley College 
are not quite what they could be, much 
less what they ought to be. I am re 
ferring, among other things, to the ac- 
tion, or rather inaction, of that grand 
and august body, the Men's Senate, sup- 
posedly the student governing body. It 
now seems as if that body is nothing but 
a hot air dispensary, also among other 
things. Student governing body, bah ! 
After the first semester's roundup and 
general debacle, in which they "hop all 
over" the incoming Freshmen, the Sen- 
ate sinks back into the reveries of a 
would-be and "dreams the old dreams" 
of the days long gone by, when the Sen- 
ate really meant something or other. 
Shades of old Rome! Of course, once in 
a long while the Senate wakens a bit 
to wheeze out such a warning as they 
managed to produce last Thursday, but 
it doesn't last very long, as has been seen. 
Sleep is so pleasant and the alarm clock 
so bothersome. The worthy Abraham 
Lincoln would tremble, even in his sleep 
of death, to hear the modern Lebanon 
Valley version of his ideal, "a govern- 
ment of the people, by the people, and 
for the people." It seems as if around 
here it has been transformed to a gov- 
ernment "of the athletes, by the athletes, 
and for the athletes." And may it perish 
from the earth. 

Yours very truly, 

Anon. 



CHOIR TO PRESENT 

SEVERAL CONCERTS 



(Continued from page 1) 



DI NUNZIO 
SHOE SHOP 

"Our Motto is to Please" 
A Trial Will Convince You 
9 E. Main St., ANNVILLE, PA. 



Registered Puppies 



Toy Black and Tan Eskimo U. K. C. 
and Schipperke the ideal house dog, 
A. K. C. 

Schipperke Kennels 

A. T. BRIGHTON 

35 East Main St. 
Annville, Penna. 



The glee club will travel to Chambers- 
burg on Saturday afternoon, May 15, to 
present a program before the general con- 
ference of the United Brethren Church, 
which is convening in Chambersburg this 
week. 

The program, which is in the evening 
session, will be divided between the glee 
clubs of Shenandoah College and Leb- 
anon Valley. Each club will present a 
portion of its program. 

A concert in Ephrata has been sched- 
uled for Tuesday, May 18. 



Compliments of 

A. & P. STORE 

C. H. SHEARER, Mgr. 

PRIME UP 

for the 
PROM 



KARL'S SHOP 



Sandwiches of all kinds 
Hot Wieners 
Hamburgers 

Bar-B-Q Sandwiches 

Salads of all kinds 
Also Short Orders, Steaks and Chops 
^undaes, Sodas, M|ilk Shakes 
Candies, Cigars, Cigarettes 

ASTORIA LUNCH 

25 W. Main St. 
Annville, Pa. 



We are proud of our line of quality 
merchandise which includes a com- 
plete stock of 

YARDLEY ITEMS 

and 

Parker Fountain Pens and Pencils 

Diehl Drug Store 

103 W. Main St., Annville, Pa. 



GRADUATION GIFTS 

Nothing liner than a good book 

Esbenshade's Book Store 

38 N. Eighth St., LEBANON, PA. 



Men's New Spring Neckwear 
Polo Shirts 
Men's, Women's and Children's 
White Oxfords 

JOHN HIRSH 

WAGNER and SHAUD, Mg r » s 




D. L. SAYLOR & 
SONS 

Contractors 
Lumber and Coal 

ANNVILLE, PENNA. 



KREAMER BROS. 

Furniture 
Floor Coverings 
Electric Refrigerators 
Hoover Electric Sweepers 
Electric Washing Machines 

RCA Radios 
FUNERAL DIRECTORS 
Phone 144 ANNVILLE, PA. 



Meals Served Daily 

Best Sundaes in Town with 
Home Made Ice Cream 
Sandwiches, Cigarettes, Candy 

C. D. BRUNNER 

E. Main St. ANNVILLE, PA. 



Students and Teachers — 

Attractive opportunity for profitable 
summer employment, regardless of resid- 
ence. For particulars write Stanley, Inc., 
State Theatre Bldg., Harrisburg, Pa. 



Complete Your Food 
Supply For That Midnight 
Lunch By Stopping At 

FINK'S BAKERY 



We sell all types of baked producti 
at all hours. 



For School Supplies and 
Books of all Kinds Go To: 

BOLLMAN'S 

628 Cumberland Street 
LEBANON, PA. . 



CLOTHINGOF QUALITY 

J. S. BASHORE 



Lebanon 




P* 



'Start the day 

In the Modern way. 
Breakfast at the Pennway 



THE PENNWAY HOTEt 



Va 



SI 



v, 



Tt 
dire( 
presi 
8:00 

Tli 
com! 
all t: 
Strai 
"Die 
Wag- 

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Th 
taire' 

Sai 
tured 
Hanc 
chesti 

Pr< 
progi 
Strau 

Th< 
repre 
his lij 
Conv< 
fervo; 
tie wi 

Th£ 



Chica 
incluc 

The 
tion 
logue. 
by th 
religh 
forth 
it fin; 
which 
the cl 
able. 

Con 
piel" 
von > 
best \ 
r ene 1 
^niu s 

Ki 

R« 
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wher 
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that 
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Ab 0l 



Tl, 

lf esi 

office 
la H 
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"V 
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farewell, Seniors 




sup m&m 

Till September 




LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



ANNVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA, THURSDAY, MAY 20, 1937 



N 



o. b 



SYMPHONY GIVES 
CONCERT TONIGHT 

R IJTLEDGE TO DIRECT 

Varied Program Includes Waltzes 
from Strauss 



The symphony orchestra, under the 
direction of Edward P. Rutledge, will 

resent its season concert tonight at 
g :0 p. 31. in Engle Hall. 

The program, which is given below, 
comprises many works of merit ranging 
a ]l the way from the lovely waltzes of 
Strauss to the great "Vorspiel" from 
«Die Meistersinger von Nuonberg" of 
Wagner. 

Opening the evening's program is the 
overture from "Iphigenia in Aules" by 
Gluek. This is typical of the simple 
irandeur of much of Gluck's music. 

The second number is "Marche Mili- 
taire" (No. 2) of Franz Schubert. 

Sara Light at the organ will be fea- 
tured in the next number as soloist in a 
Handel concerto for the organ and or- 
chestra. 

Probably the best-known work on the 
program is the "Blue Danube Waltz" of 
Strauss which follows. 

The Russian composer, Boradin, is 
represented on the program by one of 
Ms lighter compositions entitled "At the 
Convent." This selection has a religious 
fervor which is truly beautiful as its ti- 
tle would imply. 

That old favorite, "Love's Old Sweet 
Song," has been cleverly arranged by 
George Dasch, former conductor of the 
Chicago Little Symphony, and will be 
included in the concert. 

The second organ and orchestra selec- 
tion is Gigout's "Grand Choeur Dia- 
logue." The theme, which is given out 
by the organ with all the dogmatism of 
religious orthodoxy, is flung back and 
forth between organ and orchestra until 
B finally blends into one might chorus 
which proves that the rock upon which 
^ church was founded stands immov- 
able. 

Concluding the concert is the "Vors- 
P le l" from Wagner's "Die Meistersinger 
J' n Nuonberg." This is Wagner at his 

est with his subtle modulation and se- 
Fene Melody which demonstrates the true 
m ^ of that master. 



Tsdiopp to Head W &B 

Robert Tschopp was elected Presi- 
of the Wig and Buckle Club 



whe n the 



dramatists of the campus 



'^ballots for officers on Thursday. 

the v tal1 ' llusk y Red Lionite with 
a Cc ° rk Cour »ty brand of German 
t hat ent ' r «ceived the highest honor 

nor, ° 0lne t0 an actor at Leba " 
4 b The star of "The Truth 

lip s , ayds " succeeds Harold Phil- 
Vkl ° ° apabl y controlled Wig and 

j, activities for several years. 
p» esi *j ° lub elected Lena Risser, vice- 
Je an ^ ' l' 0u ise Stoner, secretary; 
c Keag, treasurer. These new 



iters 



will 



replace Kenneth East- 



e*f 0rf1 dX,ne Early, and Allen Ruth- 

>;h r Tf iveiy - 

0f tle T StUff '" Said ' 
to f ,_,. ub ' "Wig and Buckle is sure 



the head of a 
one member 



ttl ° re P ro £ ress in presenting 

N» better P^y s on th e Leba- 



le y stage." 



HEMINWAY TO BE 
W.S.G.A. PRESIDENT 

The newly elected Women's Student 
Governing Association — more commonly 
known as the Jigger Board — held an in- 
tramural election on Tuesday afternoon 
to determine who shall guide the des- 
tinies of government and Frosh-baiting 
among the fair sex during the coming 
year. In brief, the Jigger Board was 
trying to see who is going to be next 
year's Jigger Board president, which is a 
perfectly ordinary and legitimate thing \o 
be doing and therefore hardly worthy 
all the elaborate preface we are accord- 
ing it except in one respect, to wit : that 
the election process which went into 
visible operation at one o'clock on Tues- 
day afternoon in the ponderous manner 
typical of all governmental machinery ac- 
quired momentum so slowly but so thor- 
oughly that it took until nearly five 
o'clock to get the thing stopped in order 
to determine who had been elected. 

This business was somewhat complicat- 
ed by the fact that there was a tie between 
(Continued on Page 2, Column 3) 



/ r. Prom Scores Hit 

With Large Crowd 

Almost 350 persons attended the annual 
Junior Prom last Friday evening, May 
14, setting a new high for Prom attend- 
ance. Headed by Walter Fridinger, the 
Prom leader, and Jean Houck, his part- 
ner, this group of students, alumni, and 
guests danced on the Hersehy Park 
ballroom floor to the rhythm of Paul 
Tremaine and his "Band from Lonely 
Acres." 

The Prom lasted for four hours. The 
dance programs were arranged to honor 
the recent coronation celebration in Lon- 
don. Interspersed among the dances was 
the evening's entertainment. The Clio 
Trio of Luiclle Maebrry, Isabelle Cox, 
and Arlene Hoffman, sang a medley of 
popular songs. Another feature of the 
entertainment program was Emily Kindt 
who played several selections on the ma- 
rimba. All the numbers were cleverly 
introduced by the Prom leader. 

The feature of the evening was the 
promenade. Under the direction of Prof. 
D. Clark .Carmean the Prom leader and 
his partner led the dancers through the 
maneuvers of the promenade, thus en- 
circling the whole floor. A noticeable 
feature of the Prom was the spirit of 
friendliness and good-will engendered. 
Old acquaintances were renewed and 
new ones formed, especially among the 
old grads, and even among the college 
students a spirit was in evidence that has 
not appeared since the student body "ral- 
lied around the flag" of the Hershey loyal 
(Continued on Page 3, Column 1) 



Merry May Makers 
Foil J. Pluvius 
With Gala Fete 



GAY CARNIVAL MAKES HIT 



Barker Straub, Crying Concessionaires, 
Organ-grinder Lend Atmosphere 

The Queen of the May made her be- 
lated .appearance on Lebanon Valley's 
campus last Saturday, May 10', at one 
o'clock. However, the fact that she ap- 
peared a week later than scheduled due 
to an outburst from old Jupiter Pluvius 
did not diminish the brightness of her 
regal splendor. The weatherman served 
up a not-too-bad day, somewhat cloudy 
and cool, but still somewhat better than 
the "raw deal" of the previous Saturday. 

The royal procession entered in the 
usual manner, but the festival as a whole 
with its carnival effect marked a pleas- 
ing departure from tradition. All the 
accompaniments of the carnival were 
there, from the organ grinder .and mon- 
key to that prince of barkers, Louis 
Straub. The effect was further height- 
ened by the dancing on the green which 
preceded the various group dances, and 
also by the balloons and toys sold by the 
peasants gay. The multi-colored stream- 
ers with which the campus was decorat- 
ed served the same purpose. 

All of the daoCfe from the pirates 
through to the fairies were executed in 
fine style, in spite of the lack of support 
from the band for the fays of the white 
net. However, on the whole the band 
performed very well, the male chorus 
being especially well received. 

Miss Esther Henderson, director of 
the May Day pageant, deserves the 
heartiest thanks as well as congratula- 
tions for her work in coordinating and 
directing the spectacle. Then too, in the 
general round of bouquet throwing the 
(Continued on Page 3, Cokuinn 1) 



/. R. C. Roasts Weiners 
In "Canyon' To-night 

The International Relations Club is 
holding a hike and doggie roast tonight 
at five o'clock to the "Canyon" back of 
Annville, the scene of the Freshman hike 
at the beginning of the college year. The 
base for operations was the home of Dr. 
Stevenson at which place the hikers as- 
sembled before setting out on the trail. 
Plenty of eats and a good time have been 
promised by Jean Harnish, in a state- 
ment to the press, for all those who at- 
tend. The company is composed of pres- 
ent members and prospective candidates 
for membership. A feature of the hike 
is the group singing of college songs, 
with possibly a few cheers interspersed. 



Seniors Have Great Expectations 



On June 7 Lebanon Valley College 
will send out into the world of affairs 
seventy-six graduates, the finished prod- 
ucts of a four year process of prepara- 
tion for the world's work. 

Just what part of this work graduates 
expect to assume this summer was of 
interest to La Vie. Consequently, know- 
ing that it will also be of interest to its 
readers, La Vie presents the plan as giv- 
en to its reporter by the seniors them- 
selves, plans not only for this summer 
too but also thereafter. 

Louis Straub is possessed of the noble 



ambition of accumulating a fortune to 
present to his Alma Mater. Pressed for 
particulars, he named house painting 
and private nursing as likely means of 
fortune accumulation. Later in the sum- 
mer he plans to enter the Seminary. 

Richard Bans announced that his con- 
suming is that of becoming a second 
Basil Zaharoff. Meanwhile he plans to 
work at the Lebanon Bethlehem Steel 
plant. 

Richard Smith will labor at the State 
Capitol this summer before entering Jef- 
(Contwmed on Page 2, Column 4) 



SENATE ELECTS 
DAVIES PRESIDENT 

Coin-tossing is the latest method of 
electing Men's Senate officers. Despair 
ing when Robert Tschop and Stanley 
Bulota continued indefinitely to run a 
close race for the office of Secretary 
Treasurer, the election board finally 
tossed for it. Robert Tschop won in 
the sensational game of chance, and Bu- 
lota's support was tossed overboard. 

The Men's Senate elected Gordon Da- 
vies, president, and Adolph Capka, vice- 
president. The elections of these men 
were not so irregular as that of the Sec- 
retary-Treasurer of the "Jigger Board.'' 

At the time of the Senate's elections, 
plans for the annual banquet were dis- 
cussed. No definite date was fixed for 
the belated banquet, already postponed 
three times. 

"If the baseball game scheduled for 
Friday, also not irrevocably scheduled, 
does not block the Senate's plans, it was 
agreed that the banquet will be held 
Friday," said one member of the Senate 
in an interview. 



Dr. Lynch Installs 

Senators-Elect 



The Arbiters of Masculine Morals, 
commonly spoken of as the Men's Senate 
took the oath of office this morning in 
chapel with a serious demeanor which 
betrayed no hint of the highly compli- 
cated process of logrolling, gerrymander- 
ing, and political throat-slitting that pre- 
ceded their recently publicized election. 

The oath was administered by Dr. 
Lynch with the customary attendant for- 
malities and the usual awesome tone of 
voice which is calculated to persuade 
any recipient betrayer of office to a path 
of rectitude. That this method is more 
efficacious in achieving its purpose than 
might at first be thought is demonstrat- 
ed by the fact that it has not been nec- 
essary within the experience of the pres- 
ent writer for the faculty or the senate 
itself to expell any of its members for 
conduct unworthy a senator. 

Careful observers have reported a con- 
sistent amelioration of the judicial 'and 
legislative quality of the senate as a 
functioning body, since it has evolved 
within three years from a sort of bully's 
club for the ragging and often the phy- 
sical maltreatment of hapless frosh into 
a body of exemplary campus citizens — 
well more or less exemplary — who have 
shown themselves capable of handling 
whatever discipline problems may arise 
among the ranks of the men students 
with an efficiency and a degree of fair- 
ness quite disproportionate to the but 
(Continued on Page 2, Column 3) 



RAGQUETEERS FIND 
WEEK f HUGH GOING 

LOCALS RING IN LOW 



Clio Elects 



The new officers of the Clionian 
Literary Society, who were elected 
last Monday, will be installed on 
Friday, May 21, at one o'clock in 
Clio Hall. 

Sylva Harclerode will take the oath 
of the Clionian president; Arlene 
Hoffman, vice-president. The other 
officers to be installed are: Louise 
Saylor, treasurer; Rita Mosher, cor- 
responding secretary; Ruth Gerry, re- 
cording secretary; Evelyn Evans, 
editor of the Olive Branch. Amy 
Meinhardt will become pianist for 
the Kappa Lambda Nu. 



Mostly Shapiro Keeps L. V. from 
Scraping Bottom 

Last week Coach Stevenson's tennis 
team gained an even break in two tennis 
matches, losing to Muhlenberg at Ann- 
ville on Wednesday 6-3, and beating Mo- 
ravian at Bethlehem on Thursday 7-1 
with rain washing out one of the doubles 
matches. 

Against Muhlenberg only Homer Don- 
rrtoyer and Stewart Shapiro succeeded 
in scoring singles victories for L. V. C. 
'Sheeny" Shenk and Clair Snell each 
captured a set before losing, but Jakie 
Uiuberger and Art Evelev succumbed in 
straight sets. The Mules won both the 
first and second doubles matches after 
terrific struggles, but defaulted the other 
match when the pangs of hunger called 
them to the dining hall. 

The result of the Moravian match was 
far better from an L. V. C. point of view. 
Donmoyer, Shapiro, Shenk, and Evelev 
scored straight set victories. Umberger 
rallied to beat Thompson in three sets. 
The Donmoyer-Shenk and Umberger- 
Evelev combinations recorded the other 
two L. V. C. triumphs. Only Clair Snell 
tasted defeat. After winning a gruelling 
opening set 10-8, he seemed to wear out 
and dropped the next two 6-0 and 6-2. 
The second doubles match was rained 
out. 

Lancaster Rides Again 

For the fourth time in two years Leb- 
anon V r alley's racqueteers fell before the 
Franklin and Marshall team last Mon- 
day. The score was 7-2. The Blue and 
White victories were recorded by Stewie 
Shapiro, No. 2 man, and the Snell- 
Evelev doubles team. Both matches re- 
juired three sets before decisions were 
(Continued on Page 3, Column 4) 



COMMERCIAL CLUB 
BANQUETS TUESDAY 



Dinner Proves Uniquely Speechless 



Members of the Commerce Club were 
assured by Prof. Milton L. Stokes that if 
there is no after-dinner speech when the 
club holds its annual banquet, "there 
will be a dinner — and what a dinner !" 

Some difficulties were encountered by 
the Commerce Club in its attempt to se- 
cure a speaker for its banquet at the 
Washington House in Shartlesville on 
Tuesday. Mr. G. H. Fries of the New- 
burger-Loeb Stock Exchange in Lebanon, 
who spoke at the banquet last year, was 
supposed to make the address after the 
business men of the campus had con- 
sumed a large quantity of the Washing- 
ton House's high-quality food, but owing 
to unforeseen circumstances was unable 
to appear. 

The policy of the Shartlesville eating 
institution made it unnecessary for the 
Commercials to eat a dinner before ar- 
riving at the banquet at 7 p. m. Food was 
placed upon the table in huge dishes, and 
guests are expected to help themselves 
in the traditional Pennsylvania Dutch 
manner. Food, food, and more food — 
including numerous varieties of dessert — 
continued to appear on the table until the 
banqueteers had been sufficiently nour- 
ished for the moment. 



PAGE TWO 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, MAY 20, 1937 



ESTABLISHED 1925 



A weekly publication by the Undergraduate Students of Lebanon Valley College 



a re we 



II To The Grads 



EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 

Charles Boyd Shaffer 



EDITORIAL BOARD 
ASSOCIATE EDITOR 
Mary Louise Stoner, '38 

FEATURE EDITOR SPORTS EDITOR 

William F. Clark, '39 Roger B. Saylor, '38 

REPORTORIAL STAFF 



Clifford Barnhart, '38 
Elizabeth Bender, '38 
Sylva Harclerode, '38 
Ernestine Jagnesak, '38 
Wanda Price, '38 
Calvin Spitler, '38 
Theresa Stefan, '38 
Howard Baier. '39 
Robert Clippinger, '39 
. nomas Guinivan, '39 



Clarence Lehman, '39 
Robert Long, '39 
Sarah MacEwen, '39 
Alice Richie, '39 
Samuel Rutter, '39 
Barbara Bowman, 
Carl Ehrhart, '40 
Evelyn Evans, '40 
John Ness, '40 
Louise Saylor, '40 



one Held may gain the ideas or attitudes 
which were acquired by a student of an- 
other held only through years of diligent 
work. Conversation with students in 
other fields prepares the ministerial stu- 
dent, for instance, for contacts with peo- 
ple in diverse occupations. The liberal 
rts college man owes it to himself to 
take advantage of conversational oppor- 
tunities and to help make '"bull sessions" 
something more than agitation against 
the administration or idle gossip about 
personalities. 



•40 



BUSINESS BOARD 
BUSINESS MANAGER CIRCULATION MANAGER 

Curvin N. Dellinger, '38 Ernest Weirick, '39 

ASSISTANT ASSISTANT 

Raymond Smith, '39 W arren Sechrist, '40 



Single Copies V/,'.;,"" 5 cents 

Subscription $1-00 per year 



Entered at the Annville, Pa., post office as second class matter, under the Act of 
March 3, 1879. , . . 

Published weekly through the school period, except during holiday vacation and 
examination week. 



REPRESENTED FOR NATIONAL ADVERTISING BY 

National Advertising Service, Inc. 

College Publishers Representative fc 
420 Madison Ave. New York. N. Y. 

CHICAdO - BOSTON - SAN FRANCISCO 
LOS ANOELES - PORTLAND • SEATTLE 

This issue has been written and edited in its entirety by the junior staff mem- 
bers. The editor disclaims all responsibility for any statements or opinions expressed 
herein. 



Vol. XIV 



THURSDAY, MAY 20, 1937 



No. 6 



THE GREAT TIN GODS 



Lebanon Valley to all intents and appearances is a liberal arts college and a 
Christian institution. La Vie is in favor in the general way with the status quo in 
both these regards. She wishes this time to come forth with a straightforward 
excoriation of certain members of the student body. 

To name them, these members are but that portion of the undergraduates who 
Are striving toward a strange, hard entity they call success in life. This success 
seems to be a mysterious goal of which the attainment will in one way or another 
afford them— as they think— the blessings of happiness and the luxury of material 
comforts, and therefore they bend their energies toward this objective with more 
or less diligence applied in some particular direction, generally that of the pro 
fession in which they expect to obtain their success, which, by definition, is a proc 
ess of amassing dollars. 

Occasionally they meet in the curriculum with some requirement which does 
not seem to them— and mayhap they are right— to offer any concrete assistance in 
the process of doHar-amassing. Therefore they rail against such requirements, and 
revile the faculty as foolish to insert such impractical material in the course Q 
study. "How," asked one of them recently, "can the study of the poetry of Keat 
and Shelley be of benefit to anyone? Everybody knows they led immoral lives ( !) 

Well, to be sure, it must be granted that the lives of certain of the poets ar 
not without their blots on the 'scutcheon— when judged by the somewhat hypo 
critical conventional standards. It is not our purpose to defend them, however 
whose poetry, in any event, is their best apology— if any apology is needed. In 
stead we merely wish to inquire what the success seekers are planning to do with 
their time and fortunes once they attain the alluring prospect toward which they 
look with so much enthusiasm. Will they invest them to obtain still greater for 
tunes:- And what will they do with their greater fortunes? Continue to pyramid 
their wealth until the immense structure crumples of its own ponderosity an 
crushes them? It seems to us that they have no other purpose in view; they are 
building a tin idol to a tin god whose glittering surfaces blind them to the weak 
ness of the structure which ultimately can only fall in smoking ruin. 

And what will the builders of tin idols do among smoking ruins? They can not 
find comfort in philosophy, for they have spurned it as stuff of no practicality 
They will not 'be able to retreat into a world of (books, for they have called book 
the resort of the idle dreamer. They will not even be able to seek 
the advice of great minds out of the past, for they have caused the teaching of 
languages in which those minds expressed themselves to be neglected in the 
schools. They will not, O woe betide them, be able to find solace even in drink, for 
they know that the cup which cheers also lowers the efficiency ! 

What then can they do? Alas, it is difficult to say. Possibly r they may be able 
to melt down their idols and recant them in the form of burial boxes into which 
ultimately they must betake themselves, the wretched creatures of an idle, silly 
world. And good riddance. 



YEAH? 



SENIORS HAVE 

GREAT EXPECTATIONS 



MERRY MAY MAKERS 

FOIL J. PLUVlT. 



(Continued from page 1) 



It seems to be an annual custom 
among colleges and schools to publish at 
least once ahout this time of the year 
a farewell screed on the departing mem 
bers of the senior class, so tradition shall 
be served. Therefore, to you, members 
of the class of 1937 of Lebanon Valley 
College, is dedicated this paean of praise 
and song of appreciation. You have been 
here at Lebanon Valley for four long, 
ind yet short, years. Perhaps the cam- 
pus and the activities on it do not seem 
to have changed perceptibly since your 
advent, either for the better or worse. 
But too often only a small part of the 
great movement is seen by the observer, 
and he loses sight of the real or final ob- 
jective, the truth. So to the college stu- 
dent progress seems to be entirely too 
slow, or there even seems to be no prog- 
ress made at all. The answer to such a 
pessimistic attitude is faith, faith in 
yourself and in other humans, faith to 
make your way in a world full of dis 
trust and evil forebodings, war shadows 
and fears, and besides that faith a will 
to conquer. 

Seniors, the world is yours to make 
or break; and carry about you a goodly 
supply of iodine and bandages. Ave! 



DR. LYNCH INSTALLS 

SENATORS-ELECT 



(Continued from page 1) 



recent maturity of the organization. 

A list of those who took the senator's 
oath follows : Seniors : Gordon Davies, 
president, Charles Raab, Adolph Caplca, 
Dean Gasteiger, John Gongloff, and John 
Walmer, day student representative; Ju- 
niors ; Robert Tschop, secretary treas- 
urer, Arthur Weidman, Stanley Bulo'ta, 
Thomas Guinivan, and Donald Ludwig, 
day student representative ; Sophomores ; 
Jack Moller, Paul Horn, and Robert 
Artz, day student representative. A non- 
voting freshman representative will be 
elected next fall in accordance with the 
custom of previous years. 



ferson Medical School. 

Duey Linger has entered the Civd Ser- 
vice as a railway postal clerk and will 
assume his duties as such after gradu- 
ation. 

Gerald Bitt'myer is seeking occupation 
in a Harrisburg steel mill or on the 
railroad for the summer. 

Edward Tollman will perspire at the 
Lebanon Bethlehem Steel foundry. 

Joseph Prowell states his intention of 
studying at the University of Vienna 
preparatory to following a medical 
course at Temple University. 

Norman Lazin is preparing to lead a 
comparatively quiet life during the sum- 
mer, working at the Bethlehem Steel mill 
at night, practice teaching at Hershey 
during the day, and working at the Army 
Navy clothing store on Saturdays, sell- 
ing military equipment at Mount Gretna 
on Sundays, but outside of these activi- 
ties Lazin declares he will have pr actio 
ally nothing to do. 

Donald Shay is looking forward to a 
Bethlehem Steel office job during the 
immediate post-graduate period and a 
teaching position at a later time. 

John Trego will pilot a Carver's ice- 
cream truck again this summer, as in 
previous years. 

William Grosz plans to continue to 
exhort his parishes on Sundays and will 
probably engage in hosiery manufactur 
ing as an avocation on weekdays. 

Edgar Messersmilh is looking for i 
muscular hard-labor job. "Nothing," he 
says, "that I couldn't have done four 
years ago." 

Harold Beamesderfer will act as sales 
man for the Winston Publishing Com 
pany, and plans later to go to Bone- 
brake Seminary. 

Karl Flocken has secured work at the 
Bethlehem Steel to be followed by 
medical course at the University of 
Pennsylvania. 

Clair Snell will also busy himself at 
the Bethlehem Steel Company before 
taking graduate work. 

Margie Smith foresees a pleasant va 
cation at Haddon Hall in Atlantic City 
with a position as a waitress. 

Belle Mulhollen intends to serve as 
counsellor at Camp Reynolds this sum 



HEMINWAY TO BE 

W. S. G. A. PRESIDENT 



OF SHIPS, AND SHOES, AND SEALING WAX 

Dr. Wallace recently told an English class that one of the most valuable op- 
portunities provided by the liberal arts college is the chance the students have for 
serious discussion. Dr. Shenk frequently comments on the "lost art of conversa- 
tion." Both of these professors, excellent conversationalists themselve s, realize that 
on a campus such as ours where almost everybody knows everybody else, there is a 
liberal education to be gained outside the classroom and books by those who are 
willing to cultivate their conversational abilities. On the campus of a liberal arts 
college are met young people of varied interests, students in many fields who are 
taking numerous different combinations of courses. In conversation the student of 



(Continued from page 1) 

Hazel Heminway and a lady whose name 
was not revealed to La Vie's representa- 
tive, and that the only way the dear gfrls 
could see to break said tie was continue 
to vote and vote and vote and vote until 
someone gave in and changed his — or 
should one say — her mind from sheer 
nervous exhaustion. But in the end vir- 
tue triumphed — or so, at least, we like to 
think, and Miss Heminway found her- 
self the official bearer of the weighty 
fasces upon which is inscribed in letters 
of Greek, Latin, and Hebrew that none 
may read the title— president of the Wo- 
men's Student Government Association. 

The peculiar circumstances of this 
election deserves perhaps more attention 
than it is possible to give them within fhe 
narrow limits of a newspaper article, 
since, as far as the editors know, they 
constitute the first and only time since the 
inception of civilization that a woman has 
ever required special inducement in order 
to change her mind. 



(Continued from page 1) 



Y. M 
must 



C. A. and Y. W. C. A. ^ 
be included for their deco 



the throne, taking care of the 



sale 



balloons and flowers, and operating 
refreshment stand. 



In spite of the general gaiety and ha 
piness that prevailed throughout the {J* 
tival, there are several people who 
indeed thankful that the affair is a ^ 
ter of history and not of current even^ 
Dr. Lietzau is happy to report that 
last West Hall is completely f ree 
those balloons which have been clutt 
ing up the landscape and floating a b ^ 
everywhere in the last week. How ar j 
Peffley also greatly rejoices and i s ^ 
ceedingly glad that he has no more birds 
to contend with and no more interru 
tion of peaceful dreams by piping an ^ 
whistling. "Hans" Brighton is happy 
the fact that he too can get a full night's 
rest now, since he does not need to re. 
main on guard all night seeing that no. 
one gets away with the Queen's throne, 
Robert Clippinger, Y. M. hawker, has 
not yet attained that sought for peace 
for there seems to be a bit of candy left 
that must be disposed of. Paul Myers 
is tired of being looked upon as a two- 
gun cowboy and of having all his erst- 
while friends mistrust him; and he is 
now anxious to settle down and 
a peaceful civilian once more. 



mer. 

Thelma Deulinger will hold a position 
as cashier at the Hershey Park Cafe- 
teria. 

Pauline Yeager may attend summer 
school and will also clerk in her father's 
grocery. 

Claire Adams expects to stay at home 
this summer, cooking, keeping house, and 
retiring early. 

Eleanor Lynch will be laying plans for 
next winter's teaching position at Ober- 
lin. 

Jean Harnish has contracted for a po- 
sition in Palmyra High School, but will 
pursue work at Penn State this summer 
preparatory to taking up her position » 
the fall. 

Maxine Early plans to work at Whe- 
lan's Drug Store in Lebanon. 

Lois Harbold expects to attend a bus- 
iness school in Philadelphia. 




"Well, what's the good news?" 

"Long Distance rates are re- 
duced ALL DAY SUNDAY 
and after seven every night. " 

• Is it somebody's birthday, wedding 
or anniversary ? Extend your best 
wishes personally— by telephone- 

THE BELL TELEPHONE COMPANY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



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LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, MAY 20, 1937 



PAGE THREE 



Sport! 



Features 



gports Shots 

Ye sports editor got out pencil and 
rule and compiled the following bat- 
£ averages for Chief Metoxen's dia- 
""nd performers. They include the Al- 
bright game. 

AB R H Ave. 

Katchmer 2 i i .500 

pBillett 19 3 7 .368 

o BiHett - 23 6 6 .261 

pavies •• 20 3 5 .250 

Walk * 2 3 .214 

overling 21 2 4 .190 

Brown * 2 ™ 

Frey 13 2 - 154 

Kress 21 5 3 .143 

Capka 2 3 2 3 .130 

Poloniak " ° 1 .083 

Ludwig 4 o .000 

Moller 3 o .000 

Art, ' 

Totals l8 9 24 37 .196 

• * • 

This team batting average has 
been rising steadily but it has not 
as yet reached awe-inspiring pro- 
portions. Only Paul Billett has 
been clubbing the ball at a re- 
spectable rate all season. After 
a poor start Gordon Davies has 
begun pounding the ball for bin- 
gles regularly. Unfortunately just 
when the offense became strong- 
er; the defense began erring 
more frequently. In fact, only six 
of the twenty runs scored against 
us in games recorded in this 
week's issue of LA VIE were 
earned runs. 

• • • 

Some folks may wonder why George 
Katchmer played first base against Muhl- 
enberg instead of Poloniak. The answer 
is just this. Friday morning "Polo" left 
for New Jersey expecting to meet his 
cohorts in Allentown the following after- 
noon. In the meantime the announce- 
ment was posted that the game was 
changed to Annville. Thus Mr. Poloniak 
found himself devoid of both teammates 
and opponents upon his arrival at the 
home of the Mules. 

• # # 

Since the sports editor has 
penned his last baseball articles 
with this issue, it is natural to 
cast an eye into the future. 
When he takes pen in hand next, 
football will be the talk of the 
sport world. Naturally is it much 
more pleasant to write about vic- 
tories than defeats, so a survey 
°f who may be returning next 
fell is in order. 



The seniors number four including 
Capt Davies, Rozman, Walmer, and 
Fridinger, all lettermen. Gone are Tind- 
a11 and Kroske of the 1934-36 elevens. In- 
cluded among the juniors are Bulota, 
We idman, Poloniak, Brown, Frey, Main, 



M-Burg Mules 
Bounce LV 6-5 



Ludwig and Smith> n nemen> an d Kress, 
ac k. The whisperers have Tony Rozman 

burning but we will not believe it until 
e se e it. The leading sophomore candi- 

J 1 ^ will be Belmar, Kreiser, Whitman 

b a 'k, and Herman. The death toll num- 
er s among others Johns, Slodysko, Friel, 

and Kleinfelter. 



Jr. 



p ROM SCORES HIT 

WITH LARGE CROWD 



(.Continued front page i) 

pkers by marching in their parade. 
l arge Tremaine's orchestra played 
b rat j o Part m making the evening's cele- 
\ 1*° a SUccessfu l one, and his swing- 
fa^ \ Ve< ? U P to all advance notices. In 
of a 11 is hoped that this year£ cho._. 
Win ° Pular ra( ho broadcasting orchestra 
et a precedent for future Proms. 



FIRST MAY-DAY LOSS 



Poor Support Causes Down- 
fall of Local Pitcher 



For the lirst time in the memory of 
the oldest grad, Lebanon Valley lost a 
May Day baseball game. The victor was 
Muhlenberg, and the score 6-5 in a seven 
inning encounter. Wretched support can 
be blamed as the main cause of Frey's 
downfall. All three of the Blue and 
White errors occurred at the wrong mo- 
ments. Right in the first inning Frey 
got into trouble. Tracy walked and with 
one down Nosal sent a hot one right 
through Billett's position at second, 
Tracy scoring. Nosal then scored as Die- 
trich hit to right. 

The Flying Dutchmen retaliated with 
three runs in their half of the inning. 
With one down Capka drew a pass and 
took second as Davies singled to right. 
Billett then bounced to pitcher Kern 
who became confused and held the ball 
as everybody advanced safely. An error 
by Farrel scored Capka and kept the 
bases loaded. Free tickets to Chris Walk 
and Katchmer forced in two more runs. 

Three runs in the fourth and another 
in the fifth, all unearned, gave the Mules 
a 6-3 lead. This was whittled down to a 
one run advantage in the sixth when 
L. V. C. pushed across two counters. 
With two out, Walk drew his second 
pass of the game. Katchmer's mighty 
triple to deep center' scored Walk, and 
Brown's single to left scored Katchmer. 
Frey also singled, sending Brown to sec 
ond, but the rally died when Seiverling 
popped to Green. 

The real star of the game was Matusa, 
left-fielder for the Mules, who, in addi- 
tion to clubbing Frey for two extra-base 
blows, m.ade three sensational catches of 
long drives. The L. V. C. stars were 
Katchmer on the offense, and Seiverling, 
who accepted eight chances at short 
stop, on the defense. The box score fol- 
lows: 

MUHLENBERG 

ABR HPO A E 

Tracy, ss - S*8 1 2 2 

Gutekunst, c - 4 12 5 10 

Nosal, cf 4 1 2 

Dietrich, lb 4 1 10 1 

Farrel, 3b 3 2 1 

Hunsicker, rf 4 

Matusa, If 3 2 2 3 

Green, 2b 3 1113 

Kern, p 3 2 



Totals .- 


31 


6 


8 21 


11 


1 


LEBANON 


VALLEY 










ABR H 


PO 


A 


/<; 




4 





1 


1 


7 







3 


1 





1 


1 







_ 4 


1 


2 


2 








Billett, 2b 


3 


1 


1 


3 


2 


1 




4 








3 










1 


1 





1 








Katchmer, lb 


.. 2 


1 


1 


8 





2 




3 





1 


1 








Frey, p 


. 3 





1 


1 


2 







27 


5 


7 


21 


12 


8 



Dutchmen Take 11-5 
Whacking from Albright 

Rejuvenated L. V. Nine Unable To 
Stem Reading Onslaught 



A revamped Lebanon Valley nine fell 
before a hard-hitting Albright outfit on 
Monday to the tune of 11-5. Concentrat- 
ed scoring in the fifth, sixth, and seventh 
innings more than made up for Lebanon 
Valley's five-run outburst in the sixth. 
Five Blue and White errors contributed 
greatly to pitcher Ralph Billett's down- 
fall, while Smoot and Fatsinger were 
blessed with perfect support in the 
pinches. 

At the end of five innings Albright led 
3-0. In the sixth the Lebanon Valley 
attack flourished for the single splurge 
of runs. Davies started the frame by 
drawing a pass. This was followed by 
R. Billett's single to center, Kress' walk, 
Walk's single to right, and P. Billett's 
base-clearing triple to center to total 
four runs. Billett came home on Brown's 
fly to left to register L. V. C's fifth and 
last marker. 

Three hits and two errors were turned 
into a quartette of markers in the sixth 
by the Red and White to put them ahead 
7-5. Three runs in the seventh inning 
and one more in the eighth raised the 
total to eleven, eight of which were un- 
earned. Fatzsinger, the winning hurler, 
had things well under control in the 
last three frames. The box score: 

LEBANON VALLEY 

AB R H PO A E 

Seiverling, ss 5 2 1 1 1 

Capka, 3b 5 1 5 

Davies, rf 3 110 1 

Ludwig, rf 1 

R. Billett, p 4 110 3 

Kress, c 3 1 9 



RACQUETEERS FIND 

WEEK TOUGH GOING 



{Continued from pay 1) 



reached. All the other matches were 
straight set victories for the Diplomats 
except the fourth singles struggle. In 
this encounter Jake Umberger won a 
hard fought first-set from Vinnie Beals, 
9-7, but faded out as Beals romped away 

Garland, F. & M. defeated Donmoyer, 
L. V. C. 8-6; 6-o. 

Shapiro, L. V. C. defeated Schleeger, 
with the next two. The summaries : 
F. & M. 3-6; 6-4; 6-4. 

Hughes, F. & M. defeated Shenk, 
L. V. C. 6-4 ; 6-2. 

Beals, F. & M. defeated Umberger, 
L. V. C. 7-9; 6-1; 6-2. 

Slavin, F. & M. defeated Snell, L V. C. 
,')-4 ; 6-2. 



Vox Populi 



Walk, cf 4 112 

P. Billett, lb 4 1 2 5 1 

Brown, If 3 4 2 1 

Frey, 2b 4 13 11 

Totals 36 5 9 24 12 5 

ALBRIGHT 

ABR HPO A E 

Bonner, ss 4 10 10 

Comba, If 4 12 10 

Reeder, lb 4 3 3 8 

Halbfoster, 2b 5 1 3 3 1 

Korner, cf 5 1 2 2 

Czaikoski, c 4 1 10 1 

Doremus, 3b 4 2 2 2 

Oslislo, rf 4 1110 

Smoot, p 2 110 

Fatzsinger, p 2 110 

Totals - 38 11 12 27 7 1 

Lebanon Valley 000 005 000— 5 

Albright 100 024 31x— 11 



To the Editor of La Vie: 

Will you kindly inform the rather 
muddle headed person whose remarks 
appeared in this column last week in an 
inquiry as to why we have been suffered 
to fill the pages of your paper with our 
scrivenings that if he is unable to see 
.any substance in our writings that just 
possibly the fault lies with his percep- 
tions rather than in any ephermerality 
in our material? 

We make this request because we feel 
certain that a person who is incapable 
of separating our three distinct person- 
alities and styles even when our articles 
are signed is certainly not to be expect- 
ed to grasp whatever nuances within 
the writings of anyone of us. 

So much for your algebraic friend. 
Very truly yours, 
Villian 
Cerberus 



Dallastown to Hear 

L. V!s Louis Strauh 

This Sunday Louis Straub will preach 
at the United Brethren Church in Dal- 
lastown, near York, Pa., in connection 
with one of the periodic journeyings of 
the Life Work Recruits who like to dig- 
nify them by the name of deputation. 

Accompanying Mr. Straub will be 
Dorothy Zeiters, celloist, and Eleanor 
Reeder, South Hall soprano. La Vie is 
unable to vouch for the accuracy of this 
information since it was necessary to 
obtain it from highly indirect sources 
owing to the regrettable dereliction of 
the L. W. R. reports from their journ- 
alistic duties during the present week. 




ISN'T THAT TRUE, PROFESSOR? 
MANY A MAM HAS *?UN ONTO 
REAL SMOKING PLEASURE 
THROUGH BORROWING A 
PIPE- LOAD OF RA. 




Muhlenberg _. 

Lebanon Valley . — 



200 310 0—6 
300 002 0—5 



Philo Elects Officers 

The following men were chosen to 
carry on the work of the organiza- 
tion: Boyd Shaffer, president; Calvin 
Spitler, vice-president; Howard Bai- 
er, secretary; Ernest Weirick, treas- 
urer; Raymond Smith, chairman of 
the executive committee; Paul Horn, 
chaplain; Russel Heller, pianist; John 
Lynch, sergeant-at-arms, and Dennis 
Geesey and Gustav Maury, assistant 
sergeants-at-arms. 



THAT'S HOW I GOT ACQUAINTED 
WITH PRINCE ALBERT, ALL RIGHTS 
AND I'VE BEEN ENJOYING IT 
ALL OF TWENTY YEARS NOW 



TWENTY- FIVE ^| 
YEARS FOR ME, 
PROFESSOR 



—AND IN ALL THAT ^ 
TIME I'VE NEVER HAD 
A x TONGUE -BITE' 
FROM PRINCE ALBERT 



MORI- RA. CERTAINLY 
GIVES A M'lLD BUT 
TASTV SMOKE, 
THANKS TO THAT 
MO- BITE' PROCESS 




pipefuls of fragrant 
tobacco in every 2-oz. 
tin of Prince Albert. 



PAGE FOUR 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, MAY 20, 1937 



archy 
and 
mehitabel 



with apologies to don marquis 



well mehitabel i guess this is 

goodbye i ate some peculiar white 

powder last night and it makes me 

feel i am about done in 

please do not worry however because 

i shall die as becomes a gentleman 

and a cockroach 

and as waiter savage landor 

says i strove with none for none 

was worth my strife 

nature i loved and next to nature 

art 

i warmed both hands before the 

lire of life 

it sinks and i 

am ready to depart 

it was fun to be here giving you 
a cockroach eye view of the 
life collegiate and it amused me 
to report that young men sat on 
the steps of south hall singing 
sweet violets sweeter than all 
the roses 

or that some one has always wanted 
to stop <a movie by letting loose 
a box of moths but was never 
able to carry his scheme into 
execution because of the difficulty 
of obtaining moths in sufficient 
i was interested too in the chap 
who said to me archy this o henry- 
guy is great stuff he changed the 
name of sinbad the sailor into 
sailbad the sinner 

well this is getting a little 
sentimental and beside the point 
but perhaps i can blame it on the 
roachpowder anyhow i never felt 
so nostalgic about this dying 
business before 
i guess its just a little 
different being close up to it 

you must remember to write to all 
my friends and have them establish 
a cockroach lobby in congress for 
the passage of a bill to make the 
sprinkling of bug poison illegal 
when this legislation goes through 
of course archy the cockroach will 
then become a martyr like st paul 
or nathan hale 

that seems a pretty dignified way 
to live being a martyr although 
it must get tiresome after a couple 
of hundred years 

this thought makes me wonder if it 
isnt likely that old nathan 
if they could bring him back instead 
of commenting upon the regrettable 
singularity of lives it is possible 
to give for one s country would 
say boy am i dying for 
a glass of beer 

then too if i become a martyr i 
will go to the cockroach heaven 
where there is no bug powder and 
all the floors have big dusty cracks 
to burrow in 

the walls are lined with bookshelves 
which are laden with cardboard bound 
volumes such as would delight the 
heart of any epicurean cockroach 
worth his weight in salt 
cardboard you know is rich in 
carbohydrates which according to 
B biologist i know are the rarest of 
cockroach delicacies 

well mehitabel i guess this is 
really the end 

i am not going out in a blaze of 
fine poetry like milton and browning 
but then im only 

archy 




Recruits Organization 

Elects New Officers 



METAMORPHOSIS 
I 

"When I Was Young and Twenty" 
I sing no praiseful lays of verdant pas- 
tures, 

Nor chant the beauty of consummate pas- 
sion, 

Nor sorrow o'er some trampled asters. 
I hate these things ! I scorn their fashion 
Of cabalistic, meaningless tinkles. 

I hate all their puny aesthetic imag'ry ; 
Give to me strength and confusion and 
clamor, 

And squalor, and lust, and civilized sav- 
agery, 

And glamour, and ash-cans — execrable 
grammar, 

And faces with tense, anxious wrinkles ! 

Give me the city, a vortex of human de- 
sire, 

The raucous, cacophonic voice of the 
masses, 

The crowds and the smoke and the cruel- 

ness and treacherous mire, 
The glitter and grime and the conflict of 

classes, 

And Holy things mingled with infamy. 

The people and gears, and fears among 
men, 

The skywardy-staggering steel of their 
towers, 

The mad rush of men to their myriad 
ends — 

The reechoing chords of a thunderous 
power 

In a strident and terrible symphony ! 
II 

"// Young Hearts Were Not So Clever" 

Ah love, you ken not how bitter 

A hate I bore against man 

To think myself part of a litter 

Of that rotten, contemptible clan 

I wished — for the greed of them — 

That Hell were the meed of them. 

I hated mankind, love, until 
Your fingers twined about my will ; 
But since that tremor wildly raced 
From soul to soul when we embraced 
The love that shone upon your face 
May now in all my thoughts be traced. 

Ill 

Intensity 

Ah love, you ask, "And will it end?" 
You do not ask me why? but — when 
The arms that now about you twine 
The lips now drunk upon the wine 
Vour lips, sweet flagon's brims do hold 
Will empty, and our sobered hearts grow 
cold. 

Cease to wonder, dear, and let us drink 
Until our stupored souls shall sink 
In slumber whereof all who weep 
Not "How long !" shall sigh, but, "Ah — 
how deep !" 

IV 

Frustration 

i. 

Another, love, may claim your hand, 
So thus suppose he knows your heart 
Not wotting I alone command 
The beating of that tender part. 



Well, I've no heart but your heart 
No life, nor love alone — 
No art to sing but your art 
You gave me for mine own. 
iii. 

You love me, this I know, and I love 
you ! 

And yet his prior claim upon your heart 
Gives him your hand for honor's due. 
Hence, since you will it so, once kiss me : 

then we part, 
iv. 

This morn I woke to a bright, steel dawn 
That shone with a strange hard sheen 
Mangling, cheap mirror, her shape now 
gone — 

Spent is the meteor's mad careen. 



The Life Work Recruit organization 
held its last meeting of the current col- 
lege year last evening in North Hall par- 
lor at 6:45 p. m. 

The main purpose of the assembly was 
the election of officers for the coming 
year. Those who have been selected by 
their fellow-organization members are 
as follows : Lloyd Beamesderfer, presi- 
dent ; Thomas Guinivan, vice-president ; 
Ethel Houtz, secretary-treasurer; Edith 
Metzger, pianist ; and Paul Horn, chair- 
man of the Deputation Committee. Horn 
has already started to lay plans for the 
program of the Committee next year, 
having several ideas for innovations and 
changes in mind. 

An amendment was passed to the con- 
stitution making the office of deputation 
chairman elective instead of appointive, 
as had maintained under the constitu- 
tion as it formerly stood. Doubt con- 
cerning the legality of such a move, in- 
asmuch as the constitution expressly 
states that amendments must be intro- 
duced in the meeting previous to that in 
which the said amendments are voted up- 
on, was calmly waved aside by the chair- 
man of the meeting, President Elwood 
Needy. 

Daniel Shearer, chairman of the De- 
putation Committee for the past year, 
gave his report of the number of deputa- 
tions sent out under the auspices of the 
organization. He reported a total of 52 
delegations to United Brethren churches, 
including 30 to churches in the East 
Pennsylvania Conference, 18 in the Penn- 
sylvania Conference, and four in the Vir 
ginia Conference. However, not all the 
deputations were sent to United Brethren 
churches. The total number of repre- 
sentatives also included visits to the Leb- 
anon County Prison, to several congre- 
gations of other than the United Brethren 
denomination, and to the regional C.C.C 
camp. 

Following the precedent set last year, 
the organization voted to present a sum 
of $10 to the World Fellowship Fund on 
the suggestion of Curvin Thompson, who 
is in charge of the World Fellowship 
project on Lebanon Valley campus. 

A motion was made and passed to 
thank those members of the Conserva- 
tory who have gone on deputations and 
furnished special music. Their efforts 
have gone a long way toward making 
the deputations successful and in carrying 
out their purpose. The Conservatory rep- 
resentatives served willingly and faith- 



We are proud of our line of quality 
merchandise which includes a com- 
plete stock of 

YARDLEY ITEMS 



and 



Parker Fountain Pens and Pencils 

Diehl Drug Store 

103 W. Main St., Annville, Pa. 



PEGGY'S BEAUTY 
SHOP 

Special on Frederick Permanent 
Waves 

$4.00 $6.00 

2 blocks West on Sheridan Avenue 



RENU SHOP 

One Day Service 
Dry Cleaning, Pressing, Repairing 
11 E. Main St. ANNVILLE. PA. 



DI NUNZI0 
SHOE SHOP 

"Our Motto is to Please" 
A Trial Will Convince You 
9 E. Main St., ANNVILLE, PA. 



Kalo Chooses Leaders 

Kalo elected its officers for the first 
semester of the college year of 1987- 
'M at a meeting of the society 011 
Wednesday, May 19. 

The result of the election is as fol- 
lows: John Gongloff, president; John 
Wahner, vice-president ; Robert 
Smith, recording secretary; Clarence 
1 .chnian, corresponding secretary; 
Ralph Hillett, treasurer; and I'aul E. 
Myers, chaplain. 



fully throughout the year and deserve 
the heartiest commendations. 

The meeting was closed with a short 
address by the newly elected president, 
in which he anticipated great things for 
the organization during his term of office 
if he is only supported and helped by the 
individual Recruits. Following the ad- 
dress Beamesderfer dismissed the meet- 
ing with prayer. 



COMING 
FRIDAY, MAY 28 

io pal; 

CASH 

for 

USED 
BOOKS 

at 

College Library 
all day 

• 

Zavelle Book Co. 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



GRADUATION GIFTS 

Nothing finer than a good book 

Esbens hade's Book Store 

38 N. Eighth St., LEBANON, PA. 



Men's New Spring Neckwear 
Polo Shirts 
Men's, Women's and Children' 
White Oxfords 

JOHN HIRSH 

WAGNER and SHAUD, M gr , 



D.L.SAYL0R& 
SONS 

Contractors 
Lumber and Coal 

ANNVILLE, PENNA. 



KREAMER BROS. 

Furniture 
Floor Coverings 
Electric Refrigerators 
Hoover Electric Sweepers 
Electric Washing Machines 

RCA Radios 
FUNERAL DIRECTORS 
Phone 144 ANNVILLE, PA. 



Meals Served Daily 

Best Sundaes in Town with 
Home Made Ice Cream 
Sandwiches, Cigarettes, Candy 

C. D. BRUNNER 

E. Main St. ANNVILLE, PA. 



Students and Teachers — 

Attractive opportunity for profitable 
summer employment, regardless of resid- 
ence. For particulars write Stanley, Inc., 
State Theatre Bldg., Harrisburg, Pa. 



Complete Your Food 
Supply For That Midnight 
Lunch By Stopping At 

FINK'S BAKERY 



We sell all types of baked product! 
at all hours. 



For School Supplies and 
Books of all Kinds Go To: 

BOLLMAN'S 

628 Cumberland Street 
LEBANON, PA. 



CLOTHINGOF QUALITY 

J. S. BASHORE 



Lebanon 





'Start the day 

In the Modern way. 

j 

Breakfast at the Pennway 



THE PENNWAY 



H0TEI